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Aga Khan Garden, Alberta (AKGA)

 
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 16833

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 9:59 am    Post subject: Aga Khan Garden, Alberta (AKGA) Reply with quote

Major projects on track for June 29 opening day

Devon— Major construction projects at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden are on track to be completed by the time the Garden opens for the season on June 29, 2018. The Garden has delayed its usual May 1 opening by almost two months, but visitors will be rewarded for their patience once they experience the Garden’s new features.

When the Garden opens on June 29, visitors will be able to experience, for the first time, the much-anticipated Aga Khan Garden, Alberta (AKGA). Unlike any in the province, and the largest of only a handful in North America, the AKGA is a spectacular contemporary garden inspired by traditional Islamic design, with water features, intricate stonework and geometric patterning. This beautiful feature is the result of a $25 million gift from His Highness the Aga Khan.

When visitors arrive at the U of A Botanic Garden, they will also be greeted by a brand new feature entry sign, parking lot, ticketing area and entry plaza, among the many improvements that have been under development for the last few years.

“It’s taken nearly a decade of planning and a few years of disruption during construction,” said Director Lee Foote, “but, finally, everything is coming together into a unique and beautiful Garden that visitors from near and far will enjoy for many decades to come.”

“Planting and finishing touches on landscaping will continue throughout the season,” said Foote, “and some areas will be roped off to allow young plants to establish successfully, but we think visitors will be thrilled when they see what’s new here.”

The delayed season opening will have impact on some annual events that normally occur in May and June. While it has been possible to reschedule some activities for later in the season, others, like the popular Mother’s Day Tea and Kurimoto Japanese Garden Spring Festival are cancelled for 2018.

The late season opening will not affect school field trips, weddings, and adult education classes, which will continue as scheduled during May and June. The Garden’s popular annual plant sale will be a two-day-only event, on May 12 & 13, and be held out of its production greenhouses.

“We’re looking forward to the return of our full event line-up next year, and we’re grateful for the understanding and patience of the public, our volunteer groups and community partners,” said Foote.

Because of the Garden’s early closure in fall of last year and late opening this year, anyone who purchased a Season Pass in 2017 will have their pass extended to Thanksgiving, 2018.

https://botanicgarden.ualberta.ca/2018/05/09/major-projects-on-track-for-june-29-opening-at-uabg/
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan Garden, Alberta

An extraordinary place of beauty and connection opens on June 29, 2018

After nearly a decade of planning and 18 months of construction, the Aga Khan Garden, Alberta will be open to the public starting June 29, 2018. Made possible by a $25-million gift to the University of Alberta from His Highness the Aga Khan, this spectacular garden is unlike anything on the continent – 4.8 hectares of modern architectural beauty inspired by Moghul traditions, designed for the Edmonton region’s climate and topography.

This is a garden for all people, of all ages and backgrounds, to connect with each other and the beauty of nature. It is a living symbol of hope, peace and unity – a place where understanding takes root.

Throughout the 2018 season, our gardeners will complete the planting of over 25,000 new perennials, trees, shrubs and wetland plants, along with finishing touches on landscaping. In 2019, once new plantings have had a chance to become established, we will announce a public grand opening celebration event.

We welcome you to experience this one-of-a-kind new feature at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden.

Plan Your Visit!

https://botanicgarden.ualberta.ca/gardens-collections/aga-khan-garden-alberta/

********
'A place of peace': $25M Aga Khan Garden is set to open

'This is a garden like you get once in a lifetime'



The Aga Khan Garden is like no other space in Alberta.

It's "a place of peace, a place open to all people, a place that welcomes different cultures and a place that gives a ... nod to the placement of humans in nature," says Lee Foote, director of University of Alberta Botanic Garden.

Foote calls the garden his "baby" and can't help but beam as he tours media through the new attraction.



Lee Foote, director of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden, marvels at the new Aga Khan Garden in Parkland County southwest of Edmonton. (Adrienne Lamb/CBC)


"This is a garden like you get once in a lifetime. I'm tremendously proud of the garden and the people that run it," said Foote.


The 4.8-hectare Mughal-inspired landscape containing 25,000 plants, trees and shrubs, required close to a decade to plan and 18 months to build.

None of it was possible without a $25-million donation from the Aga Khan, spiritual leader of Ismaili Muslims, Foote said.

"To us he's a grand donor and a kind gentleman," said Foote, who is hoping the Aga Khan will return to Alberta for a celebration of the space in 2019.

The garden, southwest of Edmonton on Highway 60, officially opens to visitors Friday.

More and video at:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/university-of-alberta-botanic-garden-cbc-edmonton-adrienne-lamb-1.4724230

******
The Aga Khan Garden: Fun facts

◦Name of garden chosen by the U of A
◦About 665,000 kg of granite used for the project
◦About 876 steel piles — 8.1 km worth — used to support structure of garden
◦Garden designed by award-winning landscape architects out of Virginia, USA
◦Fruit orchards include plum, cherry, apple, pear and apricot trees
◦Rose garden contains fountain inspired by Alberta’s wild rose symbol
◦Garden includes 12 water features and fountains

More and video at:

https://globalnews.ca/news/4300256/aga-khan-garden-university-of-alberta-botanic-garden/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 16833

PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

6 Short Information Videos About Agakhan Gardens

Aga Khan Garden, Alberta Virtual Tour

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHFnabxU2YY

Published on Apr 7, 2017

The spectacular new Aga Khan Garden, Alberta, is a gift to all Albertans from His Highness the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of the Ismaili Muslim community. The Aga Khan Garden, Alberta, will draw people from all backgrounds together in the largest Islamic-inspired garden in North America — an environment where cultural acceptance and understanding take root. Part of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden, located 5 km north of Devon, Alberta, Canada, the Aga Khan Garden, Alberta, opens to the public in June 2018. For more information, go to https://www.uab.ca/akg .

********
Designing the Aga Khan Garden: Overview

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJ7Kur2XOkc

Published on Apr 10, 2017

In this series of videos, learn more from the landscape architect about the details of the garden.

The traditions of the Islamic landscape are remarkably diverse but have common elements. The Aga Khan Garden, Alberta incorporates some of those basic common elements, adapted for the four seasons. The result is a truly unique, beautiful and meaningful space.
uab.ca/akg

*******
Designing the Garden: Importance of Geometry

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAfnjL7EdB4

Published on Apr 10, 2017


In this series of videos, learn more from the landscape architect about the details of the garden.

Geometry is an important element common in Islamic landscapes. The geometric structure of this garden acts as a framework for the local wetlands and honours the ridges of sand dunes that were once an ancient glacial lake.
uab.ca/akg

*********
Designing the Garden: A Garden for All Seasons

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiJe1J26KYA

Published on Apr 10, 2017


In this series of videos, learn more from the landscape architect about the details of the garden.

The landscape architect discusses how local plants featured in the garden respond to the seasonal changes and the paths are highlighted against the woods.

uab.ca/akg

******
Designing the Garden: Natural Performance Space

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ox6wrkySjvU

Published on Apr 10, 2017


In this series of videos, learn more from the landscape architect about the details of the garden.

A natural opening in the woods provides an opportunity for a special learning and entertainment space in the Aga Khan Garden. This additional gathering space will contribute to an expected increase in attendance—from 75,000 to 160,000 visitors each year—when the Aga Khan Garden, Alberta opens 2018.
uab.ca/akg

******
Designing the Garden: Educational Programming

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Cr2-mKX7A0

Published on Apr 10, 2017


In this series of videos, learn more from the landscape architect about the details of the garden.

The landscape architect discusses how this garden will significantly add to the curated collections, educational programming, research and conservation efforts of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden.
uab.ca/akg
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Admin



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Posts: 5366

PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://globalnews.ca/news/4300256/aga-khan-garden-university-of-alberta-botanic-garden/

Aga Khan Garden set to open southwest of Edmonton

By Caley Ramsay
Online Supervisor Global News

WATCH ABOVE: The Aga Khan Garden is set to open Friday at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden in Devon. Take a sneak peek at the facility ahead of opening day.
A A

After nearly a decade of planning, the much-anticipated Aga Khan Garden is set to open at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden in Devon on Friday.

Construction on the 4.8-hectare garden began at the beginning of 2017. The garden features secluded forest paths, fruit orchards and more than 25,000 trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and wetland plants.
Related

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“We’re so thrilled to finally be able to share with the public this time of transformation at the garden,” garden director Lee Foote said.

“From the moment people drive through our new entry gate, to their first glimpse of the extraordinary Aga Khan Garden, I’m confident visitors are going to be amazed at all that’s new and beautiful here.”

The new garden was made possible thanks to a $25-million gift from the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of about 15 million Ismaili Muslims around the world. The University of Alberta bestowed an honourary doctorate to the Aga Khan in 2009.

The Mughal-inspired garden was created using historic Islamic landscape architecture and will be the northernmost Islamic garden in the world.

READ MORE: Devonian Botanic Gardens wins national award from peers

The feature is expected to more than double the number of annual visitors to the botanic garden. Parking improvements and a new entry plaza were also constructed in order to accommodate the spike in visitors.

“The Aga Khan Garden has been designed and constructed to provide enjoyment for hundreds of years and many generations to come,” Foote said.

“Everyone is welcome to enjoy this beautiful new space created for reflection, inspiration education and intercultural dialogue.”

Finishing touches on landscaping and planting will continue throughout the year and into 2019.

The garden opens on Friday and will remain open until Oct. 8.

Watch below: After almost a decade of planning and months of construction, the highly anticipated Aga Khan Garden is set to open at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden in Devon on Friday.
The Aga Khan Garden: Fun facts

Name of garden chosen by the U of A
About 665,000 kg of granite used for the project
About 876 steel piles — 8.1 km worth — used to support structure of garden
Garden designed by award-winning landscape architects out of Virginia, USA
Fruit orchards include plum, cherry, apple, pear and apricot trees
Rose garden contains fountain inspired by Alberta’s wild rose symbol
Garden includes 12 water features and fountains
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Posts: 5366

PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://montrealgazette.com/entertainment/local-arts/paula-simons-no-person-leaves-unchanged-new-aga-khan-garden-a-gift-of-paradise/wcm/0f701880-8e6b-47a0-ad21-b7c4b3742dfd?video_autoplay=true

Montreal Gazette

Paula Simons: 'No person leaves unchanged.' New Aga Khan Garden a gift of paradise.

This is a timeless, multi-multi-multi-generational garden. Our great-great-great-grandchildren will be enjoying this garden."


Paula Simons
Updated: June 27, 2018



Beauty surrounds us, but usually we need to be walking in a garden to know it. Rumi, 13th century Persian poet.

On a sunny Wednesday morning, Lee Foote, director of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden, is leading a tour of the Aga Khan Garden.

We walk along a raised path, winding through the spruce and jackpine and aspen wilderness to a long black granite reflecting pool which mirrors the sky and the trees above. Once, Foote jokes, this was a bog. Now, it’s been transformed into a woodland bagh — the Persian word for garden.

The reflecting pool in the Woodland Bagh of the Aga Khan Garden. Larry Wong / POSTMEDIA NETWORK

Coming out of the shady forest, we’re met by a skyline of rosy-white Portuguese limestone towers, atop an imposing podium of granite and limestone. This is the Talar — the Persian word for “throne.”

From this imposing throne room, we look down on a tapestry of waterfalls, fountains, reflecting pools, and a series of formal gardens, all laid out along traditional Islamic geometric, rectilinear lines. There’s also a 250-seat outdoor Greco-Roman amphitheatre.

But this isn’t just an imported form imposed on the boreal forest. It’s not a kitschy faux-Muslim theme park. The garden embraces its northern Alberta topography and botany, redefining an ancient art form in a new setting.

My heart rushes into the garden, joyfully tasting all the delights. But reason frowns, disapproving of the heart’s bad manners. Rumi

“We’re at the heart of the lettuce,” Foote says. “This is the centre of the bull’s-eye.”

It’s a vista of soft grey limestone and granite, cascading water, green lawns and colourful blossoms. The edge of the very manicured and formal gardens blurs and blends into a natural pond. Yes, it’s an authentic Alberta slough, tidied up a bit for company. Surrounded by a young orchard of 120 fruit trees — cherry and apple and pear and plum — the pond is home to ducks and geese and coots. The native wetland contrasts sharply with imported Persian refinement. But the juxtaposition is magical.

“We have an unstated mandate here, that no person leaves unchanged,” says Foote.

“Like good poetry, the best images of the garden evoke different things for different people. There’s not a set script.”

Lee Foote, director of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden, at the heart of the lettuce. Larry Wong / POSTMEDIA NETWORK

The $25-million garden was a gift to the U of A, and to Alberta, from His Royal Highness the Aga Khan, the hereditary Imam of the world’s Shia Ismaili Muslims.

It’s part of a network of 11 traditional Islamic gardens the Aga Khan has built or restored around the globe. This is the most northerly Islamic garden in the world, and the largest in North America.

“There is no such thing as a typical Islamic garden,” says Foote. “They each conform to their own environs.”

The Aga Khan commissioned American landscape architect Thomas Woltz of Nelson Byrd Woltz to design the 4.8 hectare space, inspired by the great Mughal gardens of India and the Middle East. Such gardens, built in desert or other very hot climates, celebrated water. Here too, fountains and pools create humid microclimates, nurturing the plants around them.

Beauty is the garden scent of roses, murmuring water flowing gently … Can words describe the indescribable? Rumi

The perennials and annuals, the rose bushes and saplings, have just been put in place. It won’t be until late July that everything is in full bloom. And it will take years before the garden grows into its full self. Foote acknowledges the garden looks a bit austere. Once the flower beds come into their own, he says, they’ll soften the sharp edges, like curvilinear Arabic calligraphy, like traditional Persian paisley-shapes.

The Rose Bagh features a fountain in the shape of a five-petalled Alberta wild rose. Larry Wong / POSTMEDIA NETWORK

“As it matures, it will take on a totally different aura. This garden is still in its larval stage and it’s going to take a lot of time to mature.”

He’s willing to wait.

“It’s built to last 600 years. This is a timeless, multi-multi-multi-generational garden. Our great-great-great-grandchildren will be enjoying this garden.”

And don’tthink the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It’s quiet, but the roots are down there riotous. Rumi

A view from the Talar, or Throne, of the Aga Khan Garden. Larry Wong / POSTMEDIA NETWORK

The Aga Khan garden is just part of the site’s total makeover. Formerly the Devonian Botanic Garden, the park, located on Highway 60 between Enoch and Devon, will welcome visitors when it opens this Friday with $13 million in other renovations. There’s a new entry plaza. New parking lots. A new sewage treatment system. Wi-Fi. A new shuttle service for people with mobility issues.

That’s handy. Thanks to the grace and grandeur of the Aga Khan’s gift, I suspect attendance at University of Alberta Botanic Garden is about to blossom. We can’t all be invited to the Aga Khan’s island. We can, though, visit the little piece of paradise he’s given us.
Related

Aga Khan drops $25 million gift on U of A Botanic Garden
Construction of new $25 million Aga Khan garden reaches halfway point
Paula Simons: The fascinating past and uncertain future of Devonian Garden’s Dyde House

psimons@postmedia.com

twitter.com/Paulatics

www.facebook.com/EJPaulaSimons

Subscribe to our provincial affairs podcast, The Press Gallery, on iTunes or on Google Play

SIDEBAR — BY THE NUMBERS

What does it take to build a $25 million garden?

More than 25,000 trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and wetland plants
665,000 kg of granite
200,000 kg of Ontario limestone
875 underground steel piles
12 water features and fountains
4.8 hectares of land
18 months of construction work by Clark Builders
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 16833

PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paula Simons: 'No person leaves unchanged.' New Aga Khan Garden a gift of paradise.

This is a timeless, multi-multi-multi-generational garden. Our great-great-great-grandchildren will be enjoying this garden."


Beauty surrounds us, but usually we need to be walking in a garden to know it. Rumi, 13th century Persian poet.

On a sunny Wednesday morning, Lee Foote, director of the University of Alberta Botanic Garden, is leading a tour of the Aga Khan Garden.

We walk along a raised path, winding through the spruce and jackpine and aspen wilderness to a long black granite reflecting pool which mirrors the sky and the trees above. Once, Foote jokes, this was a bog. Now, it’s been transformed into a woodland bagh — the Persian word for garden

More and photos/video at:

http://edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/local-arts/paula-simons-no-person-leaves-unchanged-new-aga-khan-garden-a-gift-of-paradise

********
New Aga Khan Garden opens Friday at U of A Botanic Garden
Designed for the region’s climate and topography, spectacular one-of-a-kind garden offers a place for connection, contemplation and education.


By KERRY MULHOLLAND

A unique and spectacular new addition to the University of Alberta Botanic Garden will be unveiled to the public this Friday as it opens for the season.

The Aga Khan Garden, a new 4.8-hectare garden made possible by a $25-million gift from the spiritual leader of the Shia Ismaili community, was designed for the Edmonton region’s climate and topography.

The geometrically designed garden, which is a modern interpretation of traditional Mughal architecture, features secluded forest paths, wide stepped terraces, granite and limestone walls and paving stones, 12 water features—including some that stream into wetlands—and an outdoor amphitheatre.

A fruit orchard containing plum, cherry, apple and pear trees, along with one apricot tree, extends around the large Calla Pond at one extremity of the garden while more than 25,000 trees, shrubs and perennials, annuals and wetland plants from different species around the world, all selected for fragrance, beauty and the ability to survive Alberta’s harsh climate, have been planted in the garden.

“This is a garden you get once in a lifetime,” said Lee Foote, director of the U of A Botanic Garden. “It engages all the senses, from the sound of the water to the taste of the fruit, the smell of the roses, the feel of the limestone and granite, and the sheer beauty of it all.”

More and photos:

https://www.folio.ca/new-aga-khan-garden-opens-friday-at-u-of-a-botanic-garden/
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kmaherali



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Posts: 16833

PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan Garden in Edmonton opens to public


4.8 hectare Mughal-inspired space is northernmost Islamic garden in world
Made possible by a $25-million gift from His Highness the Aga Khan
Expected to more than double annual visitors from 75,000 to 160,000
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 29 June 2018 – After nearly a decade of planning and 18 months of construction, the much-anticipated new Aga Khan Garden in Edmonton, Alberta, was opened to the public.

The 4.8 hectare Mughal-inspired garden, made possible by a CAD 25-million gift from His Highness the Aga Khan, features secluded forest paths, granite and limestone terraces, still pools that reflect the prairie sky and a waterfall that tumbles over textured stone. Fruit orchards extend around the large Calla Pond, and the garden contains more than 25,000 trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and wetland plants, selected for fragrance, beauty and the ability to survive Alberta’s harsh climate.

“Everyone is welcome to enjoy this beautiful new space created for reflection, inspiration education and intercultural dialogue,” said garden director Lee Foote. “Finishing touches on landscaping and planting around the garden will be going on throughout the 2018 season, and in 2019, once new plantings have had a chance to become established, a public opening celebration of the Aga Khan Garden will be held.”

More....
http://www.akdn.org/press-release/aga-khan-garden-edmonton-opens-public
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.sprucegroveexaminer.com/2018/07/05/university-of-albertas-aga-khan-botanic-gardens-opens


University of Alberta's Aga Khan Botanic Gardens opens


By Patrick Davies, Spruce Grove Examiner/Stony Plain Reporter

Thursday, July 5, 2018 10:01:39 MDT AM

On June 29 the University of Alberta Botanic Gardens opened with its newest addition, the Aga Khan Garden, premiering to the public. The result of almost a decade of planning and 18 months of construction, it stands as the northernmost Islamic-themed garden in the world.

Professor Lee Foote, the director of the University of Alberta Botanical Gardens, has overseen the Aga Khan project since its inception.

“It’s a remarkable structure that draws influence from many of the great gardens of the world such as the Taj Mahal, the Alhambra and many others,” Foote said.

Inspired by Mughal architecture, the 4.8 hectares garden was made possible by a $25-million gift from his Highness the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of the Ismali Muslim people. It features over 25,000 trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and wetland plants all chosen for their hardiness and fragrance.

Foote said that certain warm weather plants, which are usually featured in similar gardens, will instead be represented in stone bas reliefs (murals) including pomegranates, dates, oranges and fig trees.

As fauna goes, the garden is host to many songbirds, 400 species of pollinators and waterfowl with a moose proof fence now surrounding the garden to keep large mammals out.

The garden is constructed primarily from Canadian granite and limestone. It is specially designed to last for hundreds of years, with a textured waterfall at its centre.

“There are 830 tonnes of detailed stonework done by Scorpio Masonry, it follows fairly traditional lines using a lot of precision cut stone welded together in geometric patterns that give a nod to the complex mathematics of Mesopotamia,” Foote said.

The architect of the project was Nelson Byrd Woltz, an American architectural firm which traveled to sites across the world for inspiration. After designing the building it was approved by the Aga Khan, an architect enthusiast, before the 65-man construction crew began their work through summer and winter.

Foote said the garden’s primary purposes are to be a place of connection, enjoyment, contemplation and education.

One point Foote wanted to stress was that this garden is not a religious garden, but rather one of cultural Islam. He said it is an important distinction to make as people can come to the gardens to learn about the culture or simply enjoy the inspiring space.

“I always say it, everyone that comes here will be affected slightly differently. Visitors will find their favourite place, they will find their own meaning whether its horticultural, architectural or spiritual,” Foote said. “Nobody should leave unchanged, we want to touch people’s souls with this garden.”

While the bulk of construction on the Aga Khan Garden may be completed there is still more to be added. The planned pavilion, which Foote has petitioned Parkland County to help fund, is to be a companion space adjacent to the Aga Khan Garden.

It will take $5.2-million to build, of which they have a little over $2.5-million in promised or in hand according to Foote. Once the funds are in place they will break ground on the projected nine-month build. This will greatly enhance the winter programming for the garden, give events like weddings a place to be held and provide an alternative concert venue in bad weather.

“We expect attendance here in Eastern Parkland to jump from 70,000 in a average year to approaching 160,000,” Foote said. “We fully expect to be the largest tourist attraction in Parkland County.”

Everything in the garden from fountains, the amphitheatre and the flower beds are all mobility accessible by wheelchairs and strollers.

“We put an emphasis on everybody-rural-urban-no racial, no creed, no religious restrictions, this is a garden for everybody,” Foote said.

Foote believes the Botanic Gardens will become for Parkland County what the Telus Science Center is to Edmonton, with one being hard pressed to find a student who hasn’t visited them.

“The sense of completion is just dawning on me, it’s like you’ve seen this wave offshore approaching for eight years and as it approaches it grows bigger and bigger then you ever expected,” Foote said, “Now its curling and crashing and you get the chance to hop on your boogie board and surf it all the way to the beach.”

The Aga Khan will occupy the rest of Foote’s career, as he adds the final touches, develops programming and hosts international delegations.

“The Botanic Garden had been a rather sleepy place for two decades, we were a gorgeous set, rural garden and it was like a mushroom building up its reserves and finally popping up and blossoming,” Foote said.

Foote advises attendees to come at different times of the day and in different weather conditions. Photographers especially will find the garden has multiple unique looks as the day and weather progresses.

For those interested in finding one of the many hidden nooks and alcoves the garden boasts Foote encourages people to come, enjoy the high speed internet, and work in a natural setting.

“We talk about working from home a lot, so how about working from the garden?” Foote asked.

Admission to the Botanic Gardens this year is $15.85 a person.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paradise in the Prairies: University of Alberta Botanic Garden and the new Aga Khan garden. 30+ Image tour

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https://steemit.com/travel/@ladybug146/paradise-in-the-prairies-university-of-alberta-botanic-garden-and-the-new-aga-khan-garden-30-image-tour
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