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Imam Sultan Mohammed Shah - Nov. 2nd birth & History
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:49 am    Post subject: Imam Sultan Mohammed Shah - Nov. 2nd birth & History Reply with quote

A great leader and a social reformer
Monday, November 02, 2009
By Dr Jan-e-Alam Khaki

Karachi

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan-III (1877-1957) was a renowned nineteeth and twentieth century leader of international stature. Born in Karachi on November 2, 1877, he became a world statesman, “guide, philosopher and the friend of the world of Islam” (Qayyum, 1969).

Through his intimate knowledge of Eastern as well as Western cultures (K.K Aziz, 1998), he was uniquely placed to play a significant role in the international affairs of his time, and his long public career had many dimensions. He was a member of the Indian Imperial Legislative Council from 1902 to 1904, president of the All-India Muslim League from 1906 to 1913, and founder of the All-India Muslim Conference (1928-29).

He is credited to have successfully campaigned for separate electorates for the Muslims of India, and led a delegation in 1906 to the Viceroy for this purpose. According to K. K Aziz , Sir Aga Khan-III was the “leader of the Muslims,” and the “entire Indian delegation” to the Round Table Conference in London (1930-32), which was to discuss India’s constitutional future. He served as India’s representative at the Conference for the Reduction of Armaments in Geneva in 1932, and as the chief delegate of India at the League of Nations in the 1930s.

In 1937, he was unanimously elected President of the League of Nations (Aziz, Ibid). He was the 48th Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, and the grandfather of the present Prince Karim Aga Khan.

Sir Aga Khan-III was a social reformer whose concerns had many dimensions, including the alleviation of rural poverty and the uplift of women in society. An advocate of modern education, he became an ardent supporter of female and male educational advancement in the subcontinent and East Arica, and played a key role in the development of the Muslim University of Aligarh.

A keen connoisseur of culture, he advocated a truly multicultural and pluralistic education, blending the best and highest of Eastern and Western literary classics.

He was a champion of amity between nations and people. In India, he consistently supported the ideal of Hindu-Muslim unity, reminding both communities that India was their common parent. On the international scene, he strove consistently for world peace.

Though it is difficult to encompass the several dimensions of the role played by Sir Aga Khan-III, this article focuses on his views on education, specifically with regard to women. He advocated education and enlightenment for all, with a special emphasis on women.

He was quite concerned that many communities had apathetic attitudes towards women and did not allow them an enabling environment for their intellectual and social growth.

He became so strong a spokesperson in favour of female education, that he insisted that if parents had two children and if they could educate only one child, they should educate the girl.

Sir Aga Khan-III believed that women must be treated at par with men as they have been created equal. No progressive thinker of today, he argued, will challenge the claim that the social advancement and general wellbeing of communities are greatest where women are least debarred, by artificial barriers and narrow prejudice, from taking their full position as citizens. Progressive modernisation, which depends on co-operation and understanding, will be impossible unless women are permitted to play their legitimate part in the great work of national regeneration on the basis of political equality.

Sir Aga Khan used to say how heartbroken he was to see how little women were contributing to the national development as compared to what they were capable of.

Addressing women once, he said, “I do not think you (women) realise yourselves and I am sorry to say, certainly the men of Pakistan and a few other Muslim countries do not realise the importance of women taking an equal rank with men in the welfare, in the government and in the general activity and prosperity of the country.”

He thought that a country was like a human body, and men and women were like two lungs. If you reduce the power of women, he would argue, it is exactly like a human being who has one lung perforated by tuberculosis and only one lung to work.

Sir Aga Khan-III wanted to have an empowering perspective about the development of women and their role in society. He was worried that Pakistani women are not given enough space to learn and contribute to society. He worried about the future of women’s role in society and warned in early 20th century that if Pakistan “does not rise to the modern idea of the equal position of women, you will find not only Europe but all the other countries of Asia going ahead of you. I am heartbroken when I see how little so many of our men realise what it is, and how little women contribute, compared to what they could contribute to the moral and material happiness and prosperity of the country.”

He emphasised the legitimate role of the women in the development of the society through their education and training so that the country could benefit from both the talent and wisdom of women, along with the men of Pakistan.

There is still the debate going on what role women have to play in the society and this is the time we look toward more progressive thinkers who advocated a role that is befitting to the talented women of our country. Luckily, we see many of the women progressing gradually but surely and achieving new heights of progress, but in comparison to many others societies we are still behind due to some of the prejudices that Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah spoke of around a hundred years back.

— The writer is a professor at a private university in Karachi.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=206375

*****
Special Series on Aga Khan III, 48th Imam of Shia Imami Ismailis

Posted: 01 Nov 2009 08:57 AM PST

npg-aga-khan-portrait-4354

A special series of articles on the 48th Ismaili Imam, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III (1877 – 1957) will be published throughout the month of November 2009 at www.simerg.com. The series will include his biography, excerpts from his speeches and writings, anecdotes as well as rare photographs from photographic and portrait libraries from around the world. These photos are copyright. We begin the first installment with some reflections by his grandson Prince Karim Aga Khan, who succeeded as the 49th Imam, and son (late) Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan.

http://simerg.com/literary-readings/
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Biryani



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MORE THOUGHTS ON HUMAN HAPPINESS

Source: Articles written by or Interviews granted of His Highness Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah - The Aga Khan III
Published by Mr Ismail M. Jaffer.
Ismaili House, Bombay, India.
Interview granted to The Daily Sketch
November 2, 1931

THERE IS HAPPINESS IN RELIGION, NATURE, ART AND SPORT

A LARGE, eager, mobile face. The skin lit up rather than darkened by the glow of the Eastern sun. The eyes like blazing jewels. The body in continual easy movement! The hands active in their eloquence. Every inch of the man, every atom of him, vehemently, joyously alive. A happy man! As the talk turns from point to point of the argument, a flash of the joys he speaks of radiates from his face. A kingly man - so absolute in his kingship that he would talk with the least of his subjects as an equal. Yet for all his ease and charm, you feel that he could be an edged sword when in command.

This is His Highness the Aga Khan Aga Sultan Mahomed Shah, Indian by birth and attachments, Persian and Arab by immemorial descent, the religious chief of one vast section of the Muslim world - the Ismaili Mohammedans - with countless followers in Central Asia, India and East Africa, and great racehorse-owner, who did what no other man could have done in the Great European war - kept it from being the universal Arma-geddon and final twilight of the world. At his ease in a London hotel, the happy philosopher told the Daily Sketch what, to his mind, a man needs to be happy.

First I would place spiritual happiness. A man must be at one with God. This may sound old-fashioned to some people. A few may think that they do not believe in God, and some others that it matters little to the individual in his daily life how he stands with regard to Him.
Ruling out the atheist, with whom a believer can no more argue than he can discuss colour with a blind man, it is surely strange that a believer in an omnipotent and ever-present, Deity should fail to realise that how we stand this instant and every instant toward Him matters to us more than anything else in the universe. That is the fundamental question:-Are you in harmony with God? If you are--you are happy.

Glories of Nature

Next I would place appreciation and enjoyment of the glories of nature. All those sunrises and sunsets-all the intricate miracle of sky colour, from dawn to dusk. All that splendid spendthrift beauty...... As a very rich man treasures the possession of some unique picture, so a man should treasure and exult in the possession-his individual possession-of the sights of this unique world.

Those glories are his from dawn to dusk, and then-and then comes night-" a night of stars-all eyes." The fact that Mr. So-and-So has weighed Orion in a scale and mapped beyond a peradventure the path of the Pleiades does not destroy their magic. I look up at night and I know - I know the glory of the stars. It is then that the stars speak to us - and the sense of that mystery is in our blood.

There are other more homely delights in an English landscape-twist-ing lanes with living leafy walls, villages clustered in a nook of the hills, the soft undulation of down or moorland, no more than emphasised by the occasional bold scarp of a rocky peak. But you have grandeur enough in the tall cliffs that look down so proudly on your encircling seas. All that is yours, and mine - ours for the seeing.

With nature I would link painting. Pictures are very useful. If a man cannot get to the countryside, a picture will remind him of it. And the man who has been blind to the beauty of nature may have his imagina-tion quickened by seeing the visions of great artists. He may come to see that dawn and dusk make glorious even the drab pavement of a town. Then comes literature - above all poetry. Poetry is the voice of God speaking through the lips of man.If great painting puts you in touch with nature, great poetry puts you in direct touch with God. It is not a soft indulgence, you need to be wide awake, with all your wits about you, to share the poet's joys. And, indeed, happiness is never a negative affair; it is to be won by men who are fully alive, full of the joy of living.

Joy of Horse-Riding

Next I would place the joys of rapid movement such as you get from games like golf, tennis, football, and, they tell me, cricket. As with literature the mind, so with games the body feels itself vividly, happily alive. Of all sports of rapid movement the riding of a horse is the best.
The legend of the centaur-half man, half horse-was no idle dream; for you and the splendid creature are one. As its limbs gather and stretch out in perfect rhythm, electricity passes from the animal to you. It is a joy of the spirit as of the body. Through us speak the souls of our ancestors, who have ridden horses from the beginning of time. Yes, we may well believe that the horse was with man from the beginning.

No doubt we who have ridden horses get a touch of that great happi-ness when English thoroughbreds, the exiles of Arabia, fly down the course like winged messengers of speed. Of course you cannot get a comparable feeling from the utmost Horse-Power ( save the mark! ) of a machine. No ! No !

Live Manfully. -

These are the independent means of happiness. Any man may worship God, wonder at the miracle of nature, exult when he hears (in literature) the sons of God shouting for joy, and give praise for the perfection of his body in rapid movement. But there is a dependent means of the first impor-tance.

When I speak of marriage, I need not emphasise the joys of a happy marri-age and fortunate parentage. They are inextricably interwoven-warp and woof of the same pattern, and the pattern is the whole of life in miniature. He who refuses that venture because of the risk is refusing life. No. I have no liking for hermits and other solitaries who refuse all responsibilities. They may live in a town as likely as in a desert, and their avowed purpose may be to lead holy lives; but, in fact, if they have ecstasies, they are the ecstasies of self-indulgence. My concern is not with them.

Those who accept the normal responsibilities of life, with all the chances of minor annoyance and utter catastrophe, may know many small griefs and much great sorrow - that is why I call their joys dependent - but, if they are at one with God and have lived manfully, behind the mask of sorrow, bitter though it may be, their souls will be at peace.

[Daily Sketch, 2-11-31]

Compiled and published by Mr. Ismail M. Jaffer, Ismail House, Nishanpada Road, Bombay, and Printed by M. N. Kulkarnl at the Karnatak Press, Karnatak House, Chirabazar, Bombay 2.
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18977

PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Legends: Our great knight by Sabiha Essa Khan
Sunday, 01 Nov, 2009 | 03:50 PM PST |

“The present condition of mankind offers surely, with all its dangers and all its challenges, a chance too — a chance of establishing not just material peace among nations but that better peace of God on earth. In that endeavour Islam can play its valuable constructive part, and the Islamic world can be a strong and stabilising factor provided it is really understood and its spiritual and moral power recognised and respected.”— (Excerpt from The Memoirs of Aga Khan: World Enough and Time)

In the golden history of Pakistan’s Freedom Movement, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III will always be remembered as one of the most distinguished and well-reputed leaders and diplomats. Throughout the freedom struggle, Sir Aga Khan proved to be a very responsible and productive mediator between the western world and leaders of the subcontinent. With his vast experience and a personality of international stature, he always believed that education was the ultimate tool with which Muslims of the subcontinent could be empowered and taken on the path of prosperity.

Taking forward his firm belief, he helped Muslims to build institutes of educational excellence for their intellectual, social and economic development. In 1902, at the young age of 25, in recognition of his tireless commitment to the cause of the educational development of the Muslims in the subcontinent, he was unanimously nominated as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council by the Viceroy, Lord Curzon.

One of Sir Aga Khan’s great contributions for the Muslims of the subcontinent was his remarkable contribution in the establishment of Aligarh University; he shouldered the responsibility of collecting funds for setting up this important centre of learning and excellence. He had high expectations from Sir Syed Ahmed Khan’s Aligarh Movement and that encouraged Sir Aga Khan not to leave any stone unturned in supporting his dream of establishing the Aligarh University, which played a significant role in the freedom movement of Pakistan.

From his personal wealth, he graciously donated an amount of Rs100,000. With his sincere efforts and fervour, he was able to collect Rs3 million and succeeded in laying the foundation for the future Aligarh University. As chairman of the collection fund, it was inspiring for the leaders of the Pakistan movement to see someone of his standing work selflessly for collecting funds and candidly saying, “As a mendicant, I am now going out to beg from house to house and from street to street for the children of Muslim India.”

Many rightly believe that the creation of the Mohammadan Anglo Oriental (M.A.O) College, Aligarh would have remained just a dream without the efforts and dedication of Sir Aga Khan III.

Under the dynamic leadership of Sir Aga Khan, the Simla Deputation brought success and confidence for the Muslims of the subcontinent and the Muslim leaders felt the need for a separate platform of their own in their struggle for freedom from foreign occupation. To achieve their goals, the first Muslim political organisation, The All India Muslim League, was formed in 1906 and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president — from 1906 to 1913.

After World War I, the first Round Table Conference was organised by the British government in London and was attended by Quaid-i-Azam, Sir Aga Khan, Sir Mohamed Shafi, Maulana Mohamed Ali and Maulana Fazlul Huq; Sir Aga Khan was elected as the leader and spokesman of the Muslim delegation. During this meeting, Allama Iqbal graciously spoke of the services of Sir Aga Khan and said, “We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of Sir Aga Khan whom we all admire and whom the Muslims of India love.”

Aga Khan III also had the privilege of representing India at the Disarmament Conference and in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as Chairman of the League of Nations — now known as the United Nations Organisation (UNO).

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan was the 48th Imam of Ismaili Muslims and the eminent grandfather of the present 49th Imam, Prince Karim Aga Khan. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah breathed his last on July 11, 1957 and was laid to eternal rest in Aswan, Egypt. Besides his remarkable services to the world, he has left behind an autobiography of his life entitled “Memoirs of Aga Khan — World Enough and Time”, which is an in-depth reflection of his 80 fulfilling years of life.

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/in-paper-magazine/the-review/our-great-knight
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Birthday: Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III: A leader of repute
By Mahreen Naqvi
Sunday, 31 Oct, 2010 | 09:15 AM PST |
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Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III will always be remembered as one of the most distinguished and well-reputed leaders and diplomats during Pakistan’s freedom movement. Sir Aga Khan, with his vast experience and personality of international stature, proved to be a responsible and productive mediator between the western world and the leaders of the subcontinent.

He strongly believed that education was the ultimate tool with which Muslims could be empowered and taken on the path to prosperity. Taking forward his firm belief in education, he helped Muslims build institutes of educational excellence for their intellectual, social and economic development. In recognition of his tireless commitment to the cause of educational development, in 1902 he was, at a young age of 25, unanimously nominated as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council by the viceroy, Lord Curzon.

He was an advocate of female education and said, "If I had two children, and one was a boy and the other a girl, and if I could afford to educate only one, I would have no hesitation in giving higher education to the girl." He emphasised that a woman’s influence in the family circle was enormous and the future of the generations depended upon her ability to lead the young along the right path and instruct them in the rudiments of culture and civilisation.

One of the great contributions of Sir Aga Khan was his remarkable role in the formation of Aligarh University. With high expectations from the Aligarh movement, Sir Aga Khan did not leave any stone unturned in supporting Sir Syed's dream of establishing the university, which played a significant role in the freedom movement of Pakistan. From his personal wealth, Sir Aga Khan III graciously donated an amount of Rs100,000, and was able to collect Rs3,000,000 for the university. As Chairman of the collection fund, it was inspiring for the leaders of the Pakistan movement to see him work selflessly for collecting funds.

Under the leadership of Sir Aga Khan, the Simla Deputation brought success and confidence for the Muslims of the subcontinent and Muslim leaders felt the need to have a separate platform of their own in the struggle to gain freedom from foreign occupation. To achieve their goals, the first Muslim political organisation, The All India Muslim League, was formed in 1906 and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president for six years.

The first Round Table Conference was attended by the Quaid-i-Azam, the Aga Khan, Sir Mohammed Shafi, Maulana Mohammed Ali and Maulana Fazlul Huq, with the Aga Khan as the leader and spokesman of the Muslim delegation. During this meeting, Allama Iqbal graciously spoke on the services of the Aga Khan for Muslims and said, "We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of Aga Khan whom we all admire and whom Muslims of India love."

Aga Khan III also had the privilege to represent India at the Disarmament Conference and in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as Chairman of the League of Nations or the present United Nations Organisation.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan was the 48th Imam of the Ismaili community and the grandfather of the present 49th Imam, Prince Karim Aga Khan IV. He breathed his last on July11, 1957, and was laid to rest at Aswan in Egypt. His autobiography entitled Memoirs of Aga Khan - World Enough and Time is an in-depth reflection of his 80 fulfilling years of life.

His birthday is celebrated on November 2.

http://news.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/in-paper-magazine/the-review/sir-sultan-mahomed-shah-aga-khan-iii-a-leader-of-repute-100
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III – first president of Muslim League

By Khwaja Hussain Bux

His Royal Highness Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III was one of those Muslim stalwarts who believed in Islam as a global religion and who worked ceaselessly for its triumph and glory throughout their lives. He had always been passionately interested in promoting unity and understanding among Muslims all over the world and contributed immensely to the social, cultural, political, economic and educational development of the ummah. In studying his services to Islam and the Muslims in general and that of the Indo-Pak subcontinent in particular, one would find that the most remarkable and distinguished aspect of his work is his untiring efforts to unite the Muslim community, irrespective of their geographical, political, sectarian or denominational differences and affiliations.

HRH Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III (1877-1957) was born in Karachi on November 2, 1877 and became the 48th Imam and spiritual leader of the Ismaili community at the young age of eight years (in 1885), after the sad demise of his father Aga Ali Shah. The title of His Highness had been bestowed upon him at the age of nine years. It was a clear pointer to the fact that he was held in high esteem by both the government and the people of the country.

Under the guidance of his wise mother, His Highness Aga Khan received careful educational training and within a few years he was able to read and write with perfect ease in the languages he was learning. He made remarkable progress in both Eastern and Western literature and in the knowledge of ancient and modern history. The languages specially studied by him included Persian, Arabic, English and French. He also acquired proficiency on philosophy and theology.

In 1898, at the age of 21, Prince Aga Khan made his first trip to the West. He was received in London with great honour by the prime minister, the secretary of state and other elite leaders in the British Kingdom. Queen Victoria invited him to dine with her and stay at the Windsor Castle. During her coronation ceremony, she made Prince Aga Khan to sit to her right, on the seat reserved for the highest religious personality in the British Kingdom.

After the demise of Sir Syed Ahmed and Nawab Mohsinul Mulk, the mantle of leadership of the Muslims of India fell upon the shoulders of Prince Aga Khan and it was his selfless service, which built upon the unorganised Muslim community in the sub-continent into a powerful force in the political life of the country. His great influence and prestige among the British proved a very helpful asset in the cause of Muslim standpoint being understood and appreciated by the foreign rulers.

Prince Aga Khan laid the foundation of separate nationhood of the Indian Muslims as early as 1906. It was mainly due to his efforts that the All-India Muslim League came into existence in 1906. He was voted permanent president of the Muslim League and occupied this post for seven years from 1906 to 1913.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III played a pivotal role in making the Pakistan Movement a success by inculcating political awareness among the Muslims of the sub-continent. He strived hard for cultural renaissance, social regeneration and political rehabilitation of the Muslims. He rendered invaluable services and worked in league with other Muslim leaders to further the cause of Muslim identity by constitutional means.

Aga Khan soon realised that the main cause of the political backwardness of the Muslims was due to lack of education, and to spread education among Muslims became the most important part of his life’s mission. Sir Syed Ahmed Khan had started the great Aligarh Movement, and in it, Aga Khan believed, laid the salvation of the future of Muslims. In 1902, because of devoted services to the cause of Muslim education, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah became a member of the Imperial Legislative Council and he was asked to preside over the Mohammadan Education Conference held in Delhi.

In 1911, the Aga Khan took upon himself the task of collecting funds to start the Aligarh University. A year earlier in reply to an address of welcome by the trustee of the Mohammadan Anglo Oriental College (MAO), he said he would undertake the responsibility to “build a mighty university worthy of Islam in India”. He increased the annual grant that he had been giving to the college for the last many years, and promised to contribute a substantial amount to the university funds. He donated money in cash for scholarships to the most deserving students for foreign studies, which the trustees named “Aga Khan Foreign Scholarship”.

At the Round Table Conference, the Muslim leadership was entrusted to His Highness, the Aga Khan. He performed his duty remarkably well, and with his suavity of manners and tact, and general attitude of helpfulness kept the Muslim team solidly together – which was an invisible contrast to the many and discordant voices, which spoke from the other camp. (Makers of Pakistan: Al Biruni p207)

The congress sent MK Gandhi as their sole representative to the Second Round Table Conference. During all these protracted deliberations, the Aga Khan rose to great heights as a political leader of consummate skill, a patient and skillful negotiator, a gifted and foresighted statesman. Commenting on his works as the leader of the Muslims at the Round Table Conference, Dr Shafat Ahmed Khan wrote in 1932, “The Aga Khan is the greatest Muslim leader in Asia.”

On December 15, 1932, the National League held a meeting in London in Committee Room No 10 of the Parliament building. In this meeting Allama Iqbal, speaking on the Aga Khan at the Round Table Conference, said, “We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of His Highness the Aga Khan, that worthy of statesman whom we all admire and whom the Muslims of India love for the blood that runs through his veins.” (Letters and writings of Iqbal: BA Dar, Iqbal Academy, Karachi 1967, p72)

In short, the Aga Khan had championed the cause of Muslims of the world throughout his life. He was totally dedicated to Islam – in mind, body and soul. This extraordinary personality of the Muslim world passed his last days in his Villa Barkat, at the Varsoix on the lake of Geneva and breathed his last on July 11, 1957 and was laid to eternal rest at Aswan in Egypt. We can pay real tribute to the memory of this great leader of the Muslim world by making Pakistan stronger and prosperous. In one of his messages he had identified Pakistan as “the rising star of Islam” and wished the future of the country as bright. He had invoked the young nation to forge closer unity and eschew internal violence. Let us live up to his ideals and convert Pakistan into a fortress of Islam. This we can ensure only by defending the ideological frontiers of this country and evolving as a truly Islamic welfare state free from hunger, poverty and disease.

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2010\11\02\story_2-11-2010_pg7_17

*****
A great Muslim luminary

A leader who played a pivotal role in international affairs during the early 20th century, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan was a social reformer concerned about poverty alleviation and the uplift of women in the society.

To the Muslims of the Indo-Pakistan subcontinent he was a beacon of light, a source of inspiration and a provider of moral and material support.

This great Muslim leader, one of the greatest advocates of modern and multi-cultural education for men and women in India and East Africa, was born on November 2, 1877, at Karachi.

In 1902, at the young age of 25, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah was appointed by the the Viceroy, Lord Curzon, as the youngest member of the Imperial Legislative Council.

He soon realised that the main cause of political backwardness of the Muslims was due to their neglect of education, and the educational development of Muslims became the most important part of his life’s mission.

During the same year, the Aga Khan III was asked to preside over the Muhammadan Educational Conference held at Delhi.

In his presidential address, he pointed out that the clearest way through which the decay of political power of the Muslims of India could be halted was by laying the foundation of the great central Muslim University at Aligarh. That, he said, would be a fitting tribute to Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, the father of the Muslim educational renaissance.

In 1911, the Aga Khan was nominated as the chairman of the funds collection committee and took upon himself the task of collecting funds to establish the university. His efforts bore fruit, and he was able to collect Rs3 million for the university, including a personal donation of Rs100,000.

The Aga Khan III became the first chancellor of the Aligarh University, which will remain a living monument to the Aga Khan’s educational activities in the interest of Islam.

On October 1, 1906 the Aga Khan led a distinguished delegation of 35 leading Muslims of India to Simla and presented a memorandum on behalf of the Muslims of the sub-continent.

The Simla Delegation was a success and in the Morley-Minto Reforms of 1909, it was conceded that Muslims should henceforth be elected on the basis of separate electorates.

As a result of Simla Deputation, a movement towards establishing a Muslim political organisation developed, and within three months the All-India Muslim League was formed and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president for six years (1906-1913).

The Aga Khan III also had the privilege to be the representative for India at the Disarmament Conference and in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as chairman of the League of Nations, which is now the United Nations.

After World War I, the first Round Table Conference was organised by the British government in London attended by the great Quaid-i-Azam, the Aga Khan, Sir Mohammed Shafi, Maulana Mohammed Ali and Maulana Fazlul Huq. In this conference, the delegation of Muslim leaders elected the Aga Khan as their leader and spokesman.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan, a direct descendant of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH), was the 48th spiritual Imam of the Ismaili Muslims. For many years, Ismailis have had public celebrations to mark the jubilees of their Imams as a symbolic affirmation of the bond between the Imam of the time and his followers. Ismailis celebrated Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah’s Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilees with much enthusiasm during his 72 years of Imamat.

With the proceeds of all the three jubilee celebrations, many social welfare and development institutions were further developed in Asia and Africa.

All these initiatives are now being taken forward by his grandson, His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan IV under the aegis of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN).

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III spent his last days at Villa Barkat in Geneva and breathed his last on July 11, 1957. He was laid to eternal rest at Aswan in Egypt.

In one of his messages he had identified Pakistan as “the rising star of Islam” and wished the future of the country as bright.

Today, on the occasion of his birth anniversary, we pay tribute to the memory of this great Muslim leader and hope to make Pakistan a stronger and prosperous country.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 2nd, 2010.
Shanzeh Zulfiqar November 2, 2010

http://tribune.com.pk/story/71185/a-great-muslim-luminary/

******
The role of Aga Khan III in Pakistan Movement

SHANZEH ZULFIQAR

Business Recorder Logo ARTICLE (November 02, 2010) : Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III (1877-1957) was a great Muslim leader who played a prominent role in Pakistan's Freedom Movement. Through his intimate knowledge of diverse cultural traditions, he was uniquely placed to play a significant role in the international affairs of his time, and his long public career had many dimensions.

He was born in Karachi, Pakistan (then British India) to Aga Khan II and his wife, Nawab A'lia Shamsul-Muluk, who was a granddaughter of Fath Ali Shah of Persia. At a young age of 7 years and 8 months, Sir Aga Khan III became the 48th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. Under the care of his mother, Sir Aga Khan III was not only given the religious and oriental education which his position as the religious leader of the Ismailis made indispensable, but a sound European training, a boon denied to his father and paternal grandfather. This blend of both the worlds of education gave birth to a Muslim leader fit both for the sacerdotal functions which pertained to his spiritual position, and for those social duties required of a great and enlightened leader which he was called upon to discharge by virtue of his position. Sir Aga Khan also attended Eton and Cambridge Universities.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah was a social reformer whose concerns included the alleviation of rural poverty and the upliftment of women in society. An advocate of modern education, he became an ardent supporter of male and female educational advancement in India and East Africa. A keen connoisseur of culture, he advocated a truly multicultural education blending the best and highest of Western and Eastern literary classics. He was a champion of amity between nations and peoples.

He became so strong a spokesperson in favour of female education that he insisted that if parents had two children and if they could afford to educate only one child, they should educate the girl as she would be responsible for the upbringing of future generations.

He was worried about the future of women's role in society and warned in early 20th century that, "if Pakistan does not rise to the modern idea of the equal position of women, you will find not only Europe but all the other countries of Asia going ahead of you. I am heartbroken when I see how little so many of our men realize what it is, and how little the women contribute as compared to what they could contribute to the moral and material happiness and prosperity of the country."

No progressive thinker of today, he argued, will challenge the claim that the social advancement and general well-being of communities are greatest where women are least debarred, by artificial barriers and narrow prejudice, from taking their full position as citizens. The progressive modernisation, which depends on co-operation and understanding, will be impossible unless women are permitted to play their legitimate part in the great work of national regeneration on a basis of political equality.

In 1902, at the age of 25, he was appointed a member of the Imperial Legislative Council, thus becoming the youngest member of the council. Aga Khan, like many other great Muslim leaders, realized that the main cause of Muslim backwardness was their negligence towards education. He worked towards increasing Muslim education by not only increasing his grant to the Mohammedan Anglo Oriental College, but also by generating funds for the Aligarh University.

As Chairman of the collection fund, it was quiet inspiring for the leaders of the Pakistan movement to see him work selflessly for collecting funds and candidly saying, "As a mendicant, I am now going out to beg from house-to-house and from street-to-street for the children of Muslim India". By his efforts 3 million rupees were collected, which helped in laying a solid foundation of Aligarh University. Many believed that without his efforts and dedication, establishment of the Aligarh University would have remained a dream.

Sir Aga Khan also greatly contributed towards the political cause of the Muslims of the Indian subcontinent. He led the Muslim delegation to Simla in 1906 where the Muslims, for the first time, put forward their demand for a separate electorate. He was elected the first president of the All India Muslim League in 1906, an office that he held till 1912. Aga Khan was a man of vision and was of the opinion that the reform scheme introduced by the British would be beneficial to the Muslims. He wrote a book on the need of reforms for the Muslims, known as "India in Transition", which was published in 1918.

The main cause for the formation of the Muslim League was to safeguard and advance the rights and the welfare of the Muslim community and to convey their needs and problems to the government. The Muslims had realized that it was important for them to have a platform to voice their demands; their meeting with the Viceroy at Simla had already proved productive and fruitful. Another reason for the formation of the Muslim League was to prevent the rise of any kind of hostility among the Muslims towards other communities. Sir Aga Khan was appointed the first honorary president of the Muslim League.

Sir Aga Khan was also the president of the All Parties Muslim Conference held in 1928-29. In 1930-33, he went as chairman and spokesperson of the Muslim delegation to the round table conferences. He was nominated to represent India at the League of Nations in 1932, where he continued to work until the outbreak of the World War II. He was an excellent statesman and was elected President of the League of Nations (now known as the United Nations Organisation) in July 1937. He was the only Asian to have been appointed to this high office.

Pakistan's creation owes a great deal to the hard work of the Aga Khan. Sir Aga Khan fell ill in 1954 during his visit to Dhaka and from then on struggling with ill health, passed away on 11 July 1957, in Switzerland and is buried in Aswan, Egypt. On the occasion of his birth anniversary on 02 November, we pay tribute to a great Muslim leader by renewing our pledge to make Pakistan a prosperous and advanced country.

Copyright Business Recorder, 2010

http://www.brecorder.com/news/articles-and-letters/articles/1119514:the-role-of-aga-khan-iii-in-pakistan-movement.html

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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In memoriam: Sir Aga Khan III The great visionary
InpaperMagzine | | By Kabeer Ali

October 30, 2011 (3 days ago)

His Royal Highness Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III (1877-1957) was born at Karachi on November 2, 1877 and became the 48th Imam and spiritual leader of the Ismaili community at the young age of eight years (in 1885), after the sad demise of his father Aga Ali Shah. The title of His Highness was bestowed upon him at the age of nine.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III was one of those Muslim stalwarts who believed in Islam as a world religion and worked ceaselessly for its triumph throughout his life.

Under the guidance of his judicious mother, Sir Aga Khan received careful educational training and within a few years was able to read and write with perfect ease in Persian, Arabic, English and French. He made remarkable progress in both Eastern and Western literature and in the knowledge of ancient and modern history. He was proficient in philosophy, theology and the English classics and acquired mastery over the works of Persian poets.

In 1898, Sir Aga Khan made his first trip to the West. He was received in London with great honour by the Prime Minister and elite leaders in the British Kingdom. Queen Victoria invited him to dine with her and stay at the Windsor Castle. During her coronation ceremony, she made Prince Aga Khan sit to her right, on the seat reserved for the highest personality in the British Kingdom.

Prince Aga Khan laid the foundation of a separate nation for the Indian Muslims as early as 1906. He led a deligation of Muslims to the Viceroy and demanded separate electorates for the Muslims. He was voted president of the Muslim League and occupied this post for seven years from 1906 to 1913.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III played a pivotal role in making the Pakistan Movement a success by inculcating political awareness among the Muslims of the sub-continent.

He was elected the leader and spokesman of the special delegation of Muslim leaders, which included Quaid-i-Azam, the Aga Khan, Sir Mohamed Shafi, Maulana Mohamed Ali and Maulana Fazlul Huq, that attended the Round Table Conference in London soon after World War I to introduce new reforms for the Indians. Following the success of the Round Table Conference, Sir Abdullah Haroon complimented the Aga Khan III in a letter dated December 27, 1932, and said that “On behalf of Sind please convey my heartiest thanks to all Round Table Delegates especially the Muslim Delegation whose labours were crowned with success. Sind and Muslims of India will never forget Your Highness services which you are rendering. May Allah reward you.” (Haji Sir Abdoola Haroon by A.M. Ahmad Shafi).

Sir Aga Khan realised that the main cause of the political backwardness of the Muslims was their neglect of education, and to spread education among the Muslims became the most important mission of his life. Sir Syed Ahmed Khan had started the great Aligarh Movement and in it lay the salvation of the future of Muslims. In 1902, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah became a member of the Imperial Legislative Council and was asked to preside over the Mohammadan Education Conference held in Delhi. In his presidential address he said: “We want to create for our people an intellectual capital that shall be a home of elevated ideas and high ideals, a centre from which light and guidance shall be diffused amongst the Muslims of India and out of India too, and shall hold up to the world model standard of justice and virtue and purity of our beloved faith.”

In 1911, the Aga Khan took upon himself the task of collecting funds to start the Aligarh University. He increased the annual grant that he had been giving to the college for the last many years and promised to contribute a substantial amount to the University funds. He donated money in cash for scholarships to the most deserving students for foreign studies, which the trustees named “Aga Khan Foreign Scholarship”. In his speech he said that he wanted to establish an institution capable of dealing with giving the Muslim youths not merely the finest education that can be given in India, but a training equal to that which can be given in any country in the world.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan established social development institutions in the subcontinent of India and Pakistan, “for the relief of humanity”. They include institutions such as the Diamond Jubilee Investment Trust and the Platinum Jubilee Investments Limited which in turn assisted the growth of various types of co-operative societies. Diamond Jubilee Schools for girls were set up throughout the remote Northern Areas of Pakistan. The foundations of the present education system of the Aga Khan Schools in Pakistan were laid by Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah Aga Khan III, who established over 200 schools during the 20th century, the first in 1905 in Zanzibar and in Gwadar, Balochistan, followed by schools in Dar-es-Salaam in 1906 and in Mundra, India, in 1907.

http://www.dawn.com/2011/10/30/in-memoriam-sir-aga-khan-iii-the-great-visionary.html
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 2:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ismaili Muslims across the world will celebrate the 134th birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah Aga Khan III today (Tuesday).

Born in 1877, he was the 48th Imam of the Ismaili Muslims and the grandfather of the present Imam Prince Karim Aga Khan. Acknowledging his commitment to educating the Muslims, during the year 1902, he was nominated as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council.

On October 1, 1906, His Highness Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah Aga Khan III led a distinguished delegation of 35 well-known Muslim leaders to Simla and presented a memorandum on behalf of the Muslims of the subcontinent.

Later the same year, Aga Khan III was made the first president of the All India Muslim League. He remained the president of the party for the following seven years (1906-1913).

In honour of his services for Muslim countries, he was awarded many titles by Iran, Syria and Indonesia.

During the Khilafat Movement, the Aga Khan struggled to control the breakup of the caliphate by taking up the issue at international forums. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in January 1924.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 2nd, 2011.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/286404/commemoration-134th-birth-anniversary-of-aga-khan-iii-today/

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http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=75744&Cat=2

The role of Aga Khan III Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah in development of education in Pakistan


Dr. Haji Karim Khan
Wednesday, November 02, 2011


1


Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III, the forty-eighth hereditary Imam of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims, was born on 2nd November, 1877 in Karachi.

As an Imam of the Ismaili Muslims (1885-1957), he not only provided spiritual guidance to his followers but also played a pivotal role in the intellectual, social, and economic development of Muslims around the world.

Ismaili Muslims across the world celebrated Golden, Diamond, and Platinum Jubilees of his Imamat in the years 1937, 1946, and 1954 respectively. During these Jubilee celebrations, he was weighed in gold and diamonds and these funds were used for establishing various social welfare institutions which have shown proven successes at national and international levels in many respects.

The Ismaili Imamat has a long tradition of leadership in educational development. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah also advocated access to quality education for the Muslims in the Subcontinent.

In his speech at the Muslim Educational Conference in 1904 in Bombay he said, “There are some dangers ahead and I venture to draw your attention to some of them which we can now guard against.

It would be the greatest of all our misfortunes if we now mistook instruction for education and the mere power of passing examinations for learning. It is for this reason that the thoughtful welcome the reform of the Universities which the Government of India now contemplates.

It is for this reason that the far-sighted amongst the Muslims of India desire a University where the standard of learning shall be the highest and where with scientific training there shall be that moral education - that indirect but constant reminder of the eternal difference between right and wrong which is the soul of education.”

One of Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah’s greatest contribution to the Muslims of the subcontinent was his role in the establishment of Aligarh University through provision of funds, leadership, and guidance. He not only advocated the role of Higher Education but also emphasized on the quality of primary education. In the Inaugural Speech at the All India Muhammadan Educational Conference held on December 4, 1911 in Delhi, India, he said. “While advocating the system of higher education, I must also draw your attention to the absolute necessity of a sound system of primary education. No solid superstructure can stand safely on softer soil. In order to raise our people to their legitimate sphere of power, influence and usefulness, we must have a serviceable and extended system of education for the benefit of the masses.”

A critical review of the history of the Muslim world shows that following the Second World War and subsequent decolonization in the Subcontinent and most of East and Central Africa, Muslims were deeply affected and their socio-economic conditions had deteriorated. In that era Sir Aga Khan’s educational initiatives led to the long term development of the Muslims in these regions. He established schools in various parts of the Subcontinent – the first Aga Khan Schools were set up more than a century ago in 1905 in Mundra, India and in Gwadar, Pakistan.

In the culturally sensitive region of Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) where female education was not common, he set up Diamond Jubilee Schools through the Diamond Jubilee Funds and these schools have retained the unique identity of DJ schools till today. Today, there are 179 Aga Khan Schools all across Pakistan including Aga Khan Higher Secondary Schools, which are icons of academic and architectural excellence in the areas that they serve.

Many health institutions were also set up by Sir Aga Khan. All these development initiatives are now being taken forward under the aegis of the Aga Khan Development Network founded by Sir Aga Khan’s grandson and successor, Prince Karim Aga Khan IV.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III played a leading role in the Pakistan Movement and helped create political awareness among the Muslims of the sub-continent. He was appointed president of the Muslim League and remained on this post from 1906 to 1913. He was elected as the leaders and spokesperson for the Muslim delegation at the Round Table Conference organized to introduce new reforms for the Indians.

In 1902, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah became a member of the Imperial Legislative Council and he was asked to preside over the Mohammadan Education Conference held in Delhi. In 1911, the Aga Khan took upon himself the task of collecting funds to establish the Aligarh University.

He not only assisted in generating funds but also donated money in cash for scholarships to the most deserving students for foreign studies. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah passed away on July 11, 1957 and was laid to eternal rest in Aswan, Egypt. In his entire life, he always shouldered the Muslim world to ensure peace, tranquility, justice, and compassion in the society so that people should be able to lead their lives with greater social, moral, ethical, spiritual, and intellectual values of Islam and the humanity.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 3:24 am    Post subject: Does all Jamat aware about this anniversary? answer is 'No'. Reply with quote

Thanks for the posting two articles on 134th birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah Aga Khan III, indeed very interesting articles but in my opinion this celebration is only noted by "Media", newspapers and may be T.V. only, but most jamats around the world are not aware about this anniversary, some of us including myself even don't remember the birthday of our great 48 Imam, honestly, I was totally unaware until I read your post.
Ismailis are more interested in celebrating their current Imam's birthday rather than past imams, (except yome Ali) and if they do then they have to celebrate all their 49 Imam's birthdays.
But your post are welcome.
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Remembering Aga Khan III

Today is the birthday of Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III, one of the architects of Pakistan. He was born in Karachi on November 2, 1877. Post independent generations of Pakistanis either have no knowledge or very little knowledge of his role in the Muslim awakening and the creation of Pakistan. K.K. Aziz, a well known historian has edited the Aga Khan�s speeches in two large volumes with a 198 pages introduction of his own. Professor Aziz in his preface to the volume captures incisively the lack of acknowledgement of the late Aga Khan�s achievements. He says:

�It is a sad reflection on modern Muslim historiography that the professional chronicler as much as the general educated reader needs a reminder about the contribution of such a man to his own modern history. Even in Pakistan, in whose nationalist movement he played a leading role, his achievements have received little acknowledgement: a cursory and fragmentary mention in history books, the naming of one or two roads after him (old roads which people continue to call by their old names), and the issuing of a postage stamp bearing his picture.�

More...

http://www.chitralnews.com/Aga%20Khanl-02--Nov-2011.htm
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

135th birth anniversary of Aga Khan III today

Karachi—The 135th birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mohammad Shah Aga Khan III is being observed on Friday. The 48th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, known as Aga Khan III played a pivotal role in making the Pakistan Movement a success by inculcating political awareness among the Muslims of the sub-continent. To safeguard the interests of the Indian Muslims, the Aga Khan led a long and successful campaign for separate Muslim representation in the Indian legislature.

Under the leadership of Sir Aga Khan, the Simla Deputation brought success and confidence for the Muslims of the subcontinent. He was also chosen as the spokesman for the muslim delegation to the Round Table Conference where Allama Iqbal graciously spoke on the services of the Aga Khan for Muslims.

Dr. Mohammad Iqbal on the occasion had said, “We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of Aga Khan whom we all admire and whom the Muslims of India love.”

The first Muslim political organisation, The All India Muslim League, was formed in 1906 and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president for six years. Sir Sultan Mohammad (Aga Khan III) had rendered valuable services for the Muslim community in the fields of health, education, social development and economic rehabilitation, which are now being carried forward by Prince Karim Aga Khan under the aegis of the Aga Khan Development Network. He also had the privilege to represent India at the Disarmament Conference and in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as Chairman of the League of Nations or the present United Nations Organisation.

Aga Khan III, born in Karachi in 1877 had dedicated his entire life to the cause of Islam. He will always be remembered as one of the most distinguished and well-reputed leaders and diplomats during Pakistan‘s freedom movement.—APP

http://pakobserver.net/detailnews.asp?id=180438

http://www.radio.gov.pk/newsdetail-31172

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Sir Aga Khan III and the road to educational development
Markin­g the birth annive­rsary of the 48th Imam of Shia Ismail­i Muslim­s.
By Our CorrespondentPublished: November 2, 2012 Marking the birth anniversary of the 48th Imam of Shia Ismaili Muslims.
KARACHI:
November 2 marks the birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III (1877 to 1957) — grandfather of the present spiritual leader of Ismaili Muslims His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan IV.

Sir Aga Khan III, the 48th Imam of Ismaili Muslims, whose birth anniversary is being commemorated today (Friday), was a staunch advocate of education, particularly for women. His contributions in the sectors of political rehabilitation, health, education and social development of Muslims around the world are unprecedented.

Acknowledging his commitment to the educational development of Muslims, Sir Aga Khan III was nominated as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council by Viceroy Lord Curzon in 1902 when he was 25 years old.

The foundation of the current education and health system being run under the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) was laid by him and is being currently administered by His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan IV.

Sir Aga Khan III established over 200 schools all over the world — the first in 1905 in Zanzibar and Pakistan. The era also gave birth to the Diamond Jubilee schools for girls, now commonly known as DJ schools.

At a time when school conditions and teaching methods in northern Pakistan used to be harsh and educating females was an alien phenomenon, the establishment of the DJ schools during the 1940s was a major social breakthrough.

“While advocating the system of higher education, I must also draw your attention to the absolute necessity of a sound system of primary education. No solid superstructure can stand safely on softer soil,” he had said during his inaugural speech at the All-India Muhammadan Educational Conference held on December 4, 1911 in Delhi, India.

“In order to raise our people to their legitimate sphere of power, influence and usefulness, we must have a serviceable and extended system of education for the benefit of the masses.”

Today, the Aga Khan Education Service, Pakistan (AKESP) operates 182 schools, reaching out to over 38,000 students and employs over 1,600 teachers all across Pakistan.

Many health initiatives, undertaken almost a century ago, have gained impetus in the last few decades with the establishment of health centres run by the Aga Khan Health Services and the renowned Aga Khan University Hospital.

Sir Aga Khan III realised that the main cause of the “political backwardness” of Muslims was due to their neglect of education — and spreading education among Muslims became the most important mission of his life.

In 1911, he started collecting funds to realise Sir Syed Ahmed Khan’s dream of the Aligarh University. Apart from substantial funding, he made significant donations for scholarships.

He also played a pivotal role in making the Pakistan Movement a success, leading a deputation of Muslims to the viceroy and demanding separate electorates for Muslims. He presided over the Muslim League from 1906 to 1913 and was unanimously elected as the chairman of the League of Nations in 1937.

He passed away on July 11, 1957 and was laid to eternal rest in Aswan, Egypt.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 2nd, 2012.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/459603/sir-aga-khan-iii-and-the-road-to-educational-development/

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Nov 2: Birth anniversary of sir Aga Khan III
Posted by pamiradmin The birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III is being observed todaym November 2, 2012. Sir Aga Khan III was the 48th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, He was born in Karachi in 1877 and dedicated his entire life to the cause of Islam. He will always be remembered as one of the most distinguished and well-reputed leaders and diplomats during Pakistan`s freedom movement. Sir Aga Khan, with his vast experience and personality of an international stature, proved to be a responsible and productive mediator between the western world and the leaders of the subcontinent.

From every platform, he advocated free, universal, practically oriented primary education; improved secondary schools for Muslims, and a generous provision of government and private scholarships to enable talented Muslim students to study abroad. During the 20thcentury, he established more than 200 schools in Asia and Africa. The first Aga Khan School was established by Sir Aga Khan in 1905 in Gwadar. Today, there are over 182 Aga Khan Schools all across Pakistan catering to more than 38,000 students.

It was in pursuit of his educational vision that the Aga Khan successfully dedicated himself to the project of transforming the Muhammadan Anglo-


Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III in Karachi
Oriental College at Aligarh into a leading Asian University. He envisaged Aligarh University as “an intellectual and moral capital” for Muslims, a university which would “preach the gospel of free inquiry, of large-hearted toleration and of pure morality”. In recognition of his tireless commitment to the cause of educational development, in 1902 he was, at a young age of 25, unanimously nominated as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council by the viceroy, Lord Curzon.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III played a pivotal role in making the Pakistan Movement a success by inculcating political awareness among the Muslims of the sub-continent. To safeguard the interests of the Indian Muslims, the Aga Khan led a long and successful campaign for separate Muslim representation in the Indian legislature.

Under the leadership of Sir Aga Khan, the Simla Deputation brought success and confidence for the Muslims of the subcontinent. Sir Aga Khan was also chosen as the spokesman for the Muslim delegation to the Round Table Conference where Allama Iqbal graciously spoke on the services of the Aga Khan for Muslims and said, “We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of Aga Khan whom we all admire and whom the Muslims of India love.” The first Muslim political organisation, The All India Muslim League, was formed in 1906 and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president for six years.

Aga Khan III also had the privilege to represent Indiaat the Disarmament Conference and in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as Chairman of the League of Nations or the present United Nations Organisation. He rendered valuable services for the Muslim community in the fields of health, education, social development and economic rehabilitation, which are now being carried forward by Prince Karim Aga Khan under the aegis of the Aga Khan Development Network.

Sir Aga Khan breathed his last on 11 July 1957, and was laid to rest at Aswan in Egypt. His autobiography entitled Memoirs of Aga Khan – World Enough and Time is an in-depth reflection of his 80 fulfilling years of life. [PR]

http://pamirtimes.net/2012/11/02/nov-2-birth-anniversary-of-sir-aga-khan-iii/
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2015 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

138th birth anniversary: Sir Aga Khan III: a visionary Muslim leader

November 2 marks the birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III, one of the Muslim world’s most visionary and influential leaders.

A tireless advocate for Muslims on the world stage, Aga Khan III was also a champion of women’s rights, education, healthcare and social development. With a modernist view that was nevertheless deeply rooted in the concepts of Islam, he strove to help Muslims build social capital to enable both political rehabilitation and a better quality of life.

“Our social customs, our daily work, our constant efforts must be turned up, must be brought into line with the highest form of possible civilisation. At its greatest period, Islam was at the head of science, was at the head of knowledge, and was in the advanced line of political, philosophical and literary thought.” HRH Sir Aga Khan III had said. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah himself was highly educated, with sound grounding in both Oriental and European languages and an in-depth knowledge of both Islamic and secular disciplines, including Qu’ranic studies, poetry, mathematics, astronomy and metaphysics. His views on education, elucidated at the Muslim Educational Conference in 1904 in Bombay, still resonate today:

“It would be the greatest of all our misfortunes if we now mistook instruction for education and the mere power of passing examinations for learning.”

This passion for intellectual development, particularly for Muslims in the sub-continent, translated into the campaign to build Aligarh University. After the completion of this university at Aligarh, the Aga Khan III became its first chancellor.

Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah was tireless in his fundraising efforts for the project, which he felt was pivotal for the cultural renaissance and social development of Indian Muslims, a largely disenfranchised segment of the population at large.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah was the hereditary leader of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims, of who he was the 48th Imam. However, his career as a statesman focused on Muslims as a whole. He, like his contemporary Mumtaz Ali, a Muslim leader, believed that a combination of religious and secular education was essential for the revival of Muslims in India. With the advantage of western education and a familiarisation with key social tools, Muslims would be able to function and compete in the post-colonial environment.

This was not an aggressively western and secular viewpoint – it was deeply influenced by the language and directives of Islam. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah’s programs for social reform were always grounded, articulated and legitimised within the context of Islam.

His focus on education echoed his own experience; his intellect and education enabled him to become an international diplomat of some renown. His Highness the Aga Khan III was the representative for India in the Disarmament Conference as well as in the League of Nations and in 1937 he was unanimously elected as the Chairman of League of Nations (now United Nations). It was due to his special efforts that the membership of the League of Nations was accorded to Turkey, Iraq, Afghanistan and Egypt. His example shows how a Muslim leader can work within the establishment and exercise the role of statesman.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah was also the head of the All India Muslim League and instrumental in the founding of Pakistan.

“At the Round Table Conference, the Muslim leadership was entrusted to His Highness the Aga Khan. He performed his duty remarkably well, and with his suavity of manners and tact, and general attitude of helpfulness kept the Muslim team solidly together-which was an invisible contrast to the many and discordant voices, which spoke from the other camp.” (Makers of Pakistan: Al Biruni, page 207)

A consummate negotiator on the world stage, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah demonstrated both political nous and a sound grasp of international relations. Moreover, he remained committed to bettering the situation of Muslims across the globe, focusing on education and social development as a means to the alleviation of poverty and marginalisation.

A deeply intellectual man, his writings remain a source of inspiration in a world that seems far removed from that he knew. Education and social capital are as vital for Muslims today as they were 100 years ago.

Published in The Express Tribune, November 2nd, 2015.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/983467/138th-birth-anniversary-sir-aga-khan-iii-a-visionary-muslim-leader/
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AGA KHAN III

Sultan Mahommed Shah, Aga Khan III, was the 48th Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. He was one of the founders and the first president of the All-India Muslim League, and served as President of the League of Nations from 1937-38.

After his father's death, the Aga Khan III ascended the throne of Imamate at the age of 7 years, 9 months and 16 days on 6th Zilkada, 1302/August 17, 1885. The British empire awarded him the title of His Highness in 1886 in the time of Lord Reay, the then governor of Bombay. On that occasion, the Iranian king had sent him a sword and an ivory stick as presents.

In 1897, a terrible famine had badly shaken the Bombay Presidency, therefore, the Aga Khan III supplied food and seed, cattle and agricultural tools to the needy people, and in order to provide job opportunities, he started the construction of his Yarroda Palace at Poona. In Bombay, a large camp was pitched at Hasanabad, where thousands of people were daily fed at his expense; and to those who were ashamed openly to participate in this hospitality, the grain was provided to them privately for about six months. The famine was followed by the epidemic of bubonic plague and the superstitious people of India refused to be vaccinated against the disease. The Aga Khan III obtained the service of an eminent bacteriologist, Dr. Waldemar Mordecai Wolff Haffkine, the Director-in-Chief of the Government Plague Research Laboratory, Bombay. The Aga Khan was a crusader against meaningless supersitions and traditions, when soon after famine came plague, the people were in a panic and there was a hue and cry against inoculation with anti-plague serum. He therefore collected the people at his Khusaro Lodge, where the doctor was staying and addressed meetings explaining the benefits of inoculation. In front of this gathering he got himself inoculated, so as to dispel their superstitious fears, and strengthen their confidence in scientific methods of cure. This prompted others to follow and many lives were saved as a result. In the meantime, it had been proposed to give a public dinner to the Aga Khan III in Bombay in view of his outstanding services. When he had been informed of it, he wrote to the Secretary of the Reception Committee a letter, which showed his innermost feeling evoked by the distress of the poor people. He wrote: "I cannot accept any entertainment when thousands of people are dying of starvation. It is almost wicked to waste money on rich food when thousands of people are starving. I would urge that every rupee that could be spared should be given for the relief of sufferers by famine instead of wasting it on the entertainments."

In 1316/1898, the Aga Khan III set out from Bombay on his first journey to Europe, and visited France and Britain, where he had an audience with Queen Victoria at Windsor Palace. In the state banquet at Windsor Palace, he was sitting next to the Queen on her right side. No ruling prince from India who held great temporal power would have been treated with greater honour and respect like the Aga Khan. He was invested the honourable title of Knight Commander of the Indian Empire (K.C.I.E.). He also met the future king Edward VII. The "Saint Gazette" (London, dated July 22, 1898) published the following report to this effect:-

"Her Majesty Queen Victoria had held a Levy, which was attended by Consuls of all countries, and His Highness the Aga Khan was also invited at the occasion. When the Aga Khan went there, the Queen herself went to receive him at the door and welcomed him with great respects and made him sit on the Throne of their Pope. As soon as the Aga Khan sat on the Throne, the Queen said to all the Consuls, "What is the reason of your surprise, and what you all are thinking of?" The Consuls replied, "Upto now, many Indian Kings have come to Europe, but you have given more honours to Aga Khan, and even made him sit on the Throne of our Pope; what is the reason of this?" The Queen in reply said, "You are all wise, prudent and learned, and you know better than I the reason of this. In short, I must tell you that we have never seen our religious leader Jesus Christ, and without doubt, the Aga Khan is our same leader, and considering this, I have made him sit on our Pope's Throne." On hearing this, all Consuls were greatly surprised, and wired to their respective countries about the above fact. Consequently, the Rulers of France, Germany, Italy, Belgium etc. sent telegrams to Aga Khan from all over, requesting him to give them honour of visiting their countries, which the Aga Khan accepted."

The Aga Khan III paid his first visit to East African countries in 1317/1899, where the Sultan of Zanzibar granted him the title of Brilliant Star of Zanzibar. On his second visit to Europe in 1900, the Aga Khan III held a meeting with Muzaffaruddin Shah Qajar (1313-1324/1896-1907) of Iran in Paris, who awarded him the title of Shamsul Hamayun or Star of Persia. He had also a meeting with Turkish Sultan Abdul Hamid II in Istanbul, who granted him the title of Star of Turkey. The German emperor Kaiser William II also awarded the title of First Class Prussian Order of the Royal Crown at Potsdam.
On January 22, 1901, the Queen Victoria expired, therefore, the Aga Khan III attended the funeral at London on February 2, 1901. He was the personal guest of emperor Edward VII at his coronation in August 2, 1902, who promoted the Aga Khan from the rank of Knight (K.C.I.E.) to that of Grand Commander of the Order of Indian Empire (G.C.I.E.). He returned to India in November, 1902. The viceroy of India, Lord Curzon appointed him to a seat of his Legislative Council of India.
He played important role in construction of Aligarh Muslim University. To make a concerted drive for the collection of funds,, he went on a collecting tour through India's main Muslim areas: `As a mendicant', he announced, `I am now going out to beg from house to house and from street to street for the children of Indian Muslims.' It was a triumphal tour. Wherever he went, people unharnessed the horses of his carriage and pulled it themselves for miles."

Qayyum A. Malick writes in "Prince Aga Khan" (Karachi, 1954, p. 64) that once the Aga Khan on his way to Bombay to collect funds for the university, the Aga Khan stopped his car at the office of a person, who was known to be his bitterest critic. The man stood up bewildered and asked, "Whom do you want Sir?" "I have come for your contribution to the Muslim university fund," said the Aga Khan. The man drew up a cheque for Rs. 5000/-. After pocketing the cheque, the Aga Khan took off his hat and said, "Now as a beggar, I beg from you something for the children of Islam. Put something in the bowl of this mendicant." The man wrote another cheque for Rs. 15000/- with moist eyes, and said, "Your Highness, now it is my turn to beg. I beg of you in the name of the most merciful God to forgive me for anything that I may have said against you. I never knew you were so great." The Aga Khan said, "Dont worry! It is my nature to forgive and forget in the cause of Islam and the Muslims."

At the end of the First World War in 1918, a Paris Peace Conference had been formulated by the Allies in 1919, being composed of four leading statesmen, viz. Loyed George representing Great Britain, M. Clemencean France, Signor Orlando Italy and President Wilson, the United States; and finally The League of Nations was founded in Geneva in January, 1920 and M.P. Hymans of Belgium was appointed the first President. The Aga Khan led the Indian delegates in Geneva, and attended the Disarmament Conference, where he delivered a stirring speech on February 19, 1932. He also attended the Third Disarmament Conference and made a speech on February 2, 1933. During the 15th session of the League of Nations, the Aga Khan also gave his speech to the assembly on September 27, 1934. He also addressed the League of Nations in Geneva during its 17th session on September 29, 1936. In sum, the Aga Khan's interest in international affairs in Geneva culminated in his election in the session of July, 1937 as the President of League of Nations in place of the former President, M.P. Van Zeeland of Belgium, and all the 49 member countries voted in a secret ballot were found to be in his favor.

The Aga Khan made his first presidential speech in the League of Nations on September 13, 1937 during its 18th session. Thus, Sir Samuel Hoare, the ex-Secretary of State of India was compelled to remark that, "The Aga Khan does not belong to one community or one country. He is a citizen of the world par excellence."

In 1949, the Aga Khan III was declared an Iranian citizen and was awarded the distinguished title of Hazratwala, i.e. His Royal Highness by His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah of Iran. He also visited Pakistan for the first time after independence on February 2, 1950 and was awarded an honorary degree of LL.D. from the Dacca University in 1951. On March 3, 1951, the Syrian government invested him the title of Order of Ommayad. In 1951, the Aga Khan III paid his first visit to Iran to attend the marriage of the Iranian king with queen Sorayya. Arriving in Tehran, he looked up at the sky and the land-scape and exclaimed: "What a lovely and beautiful country I have. I had been cherishing for years the desire to visit my beloved native land." On February 11, 1951, one day before the wedding ceremony, His Majesty the King had awarded the Order of the Crown First Class to the Aga Khan. During his visit to Iran, he also went to see Mahallat. Thousands of people lined the roads for a glimpse of one whose ancestors had been the revered and benevolent rulers of the area.

The Aga Khan used to raise his voice in the defence of Islam, whenever it was under inroad. In October, 1951, the "London Times" made some unfair allegations against Islam and the Prophet Muhammad. In a spirited reply to the "London Times" on October 22, 1951, he said that, "Islam was not only tolerant of other faiths but most respectful and indeed fully accepted the divine inspiration of all theistic faiths that came before Islam." He further said: "If there has been violent reaction against the West in some Muslim countries, the reason is to be found in the attitude and behaviour of the westerners, their ignorance and want of respect for the faith and culture of Islam, of which the reference to that faith in your leading article is a typical and usual example."

During his long Imamate period, the Aga Khan III devoted much of his time and resources in consolidating and organizing the Ismaili community, especially in India and East Africa. He was notably concerned with introducing the socio-economic reforms, transforming his followers into a modern, self-sufficient community with high standard of education and welfare. The development of a new communal organization thus, became one of the Aga Khan's major tasks.

In 1956, Queen Elizabeth of Britain conferred upon the Aga Khan the title of Grand Cross of the Saint Michael and Saint George (G.C.M.G.).

Sultan Muhammad Shah, the Aga Khan III, the 48th Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims died at his villa in Versoix, near Geneva on 12th Zilhaja, 1376/ July 11, 1957. His son Prince Aly Khan recalling the last days of his father, said: "Often he would ask me to play the gramophone records containing recitation of the Holy Koran. With the recitation of the Koran, I could see his lips move in silence, repeating the verse of the Koran." He was buried in a permanent mausoleum at Aswan, overlooking the Nile in Egypt. Labib Habachi writes in "Aswan" (Cairo, 1959, p. 76) that in 1947, the Aga Khan III visited Aswan, and decided to live some time each year in Aswan, choosing it as his last resting-place. The Begum Aga Khan, in her interview to "Al- Ahram" (Cairo, April 23, 1992) had however said that, "We had been coming in Aswan since 1935 when the place was not a touristic location. He (the Aga Khan III) used to say that Egypt was the flag of Islam, and he wanted to be buried there."

In accordance with his last will, his grandson, Karim was succeeded to the Imamate as the 49th Imam. A fitting tribute was paid to him by daily English "Dawn" of Pakistan on July 12, 1957 that, "With the passing away of the Aga Khan, we witness the end of an era." According to "New York Times" (July 12, 1957), "The Aga Khan III's death leaves our contemporary world just a little less colorful than it was."
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2016 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan III - Mowlana Sultan Muhammad Shah Diamond Jubilee 1945 Memorabilia

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http://tribune.com.pk/story/1218367/sir-aga-khan-iii-man-turned-wheel-fortune/


The Express Tribune > Pakistan
Sir Aga Khan III -- the man who turned the wheel of fortune
By Nizar Diamond Ali
Published: November 2, 2016


Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III was undoubtedly one of the most prominent figureheads in the international community during the Pakistan Movement years, and was equally venerated by Muslims and the Western world, particularly Great Britain.

Apart from being the 48th Imam of the Ismaili community, he was known for his monumental contributions towards the independence of Pakistan from the British. In his simultaneous roles as the leader of a Muslim sect as well as the voice of Muslims in the subcontinent in their struggle towards achieving their dream of Pakistan, Sir Aga Khan III left his mark on history with his achievements on both fronts. In terms of achieving the goal of independence for the Muslims, he focused his energies towards two specific goals: Political struggle and educational uplift.

138th birth anniversary: Sir Aga Khan III: a visionary Muslim leader

Seeking to secure the civil rights of Muslims of the Indian subcontinent, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah laid the foundation of All-India Muslim League (AIML). He led the party from its inception in December 1906 as he was unanimously elected as the first president of the AIML.

Sir Aga Khan III had continued to play this leading role as he headed a delegation representing Muslims of India who met Indian Viceroy Lord Minto in Simla in the same year, 1906. He presented the address also known as ‘A Bill of Muslim Rights’ seeking security of civil rights of Muslims, in particular, the right to form a separate electorate, and have a reserved number of seats in the parliament for Muslims. At that point in history, it was clear to both the British Raj and the Muslims of India that this young leader, only in his late 20s at the time, heading a delegation of representatives from respective Muslim areas comprising the likes of Nawab Mohsin-ul-Mulk and Nawab Waqar-ul-Mulk amongst others, was to become the cornerstone of struggle towards achieving a separate homeland. The importance of this single event is significant as for the first time Muslims rejected the idea of a homogeneous Indian nation, or the Western simple majority based democracy in which Muslims were to always remain and be treated as a subjugated minority.

By embedding the separate electorate through all subsequent legislative reforms by the British Raj, such as the Indian Councils Act of 1909, it was well established that Muslims were to be considered a nation, a vision that was further cemented later as the Two-Nation Theory.

138th birth anniversary: Sir Aga Khan III: a visionary Muslim leader

In addition to overseeing the developments of AIML, Aga Khan III was equally passionate about educational reform of the subcontinent. He considered educational decay as the main reason why Muslims were socially and politically downtrodden, while the British and Hindus were controlling the stakes of the government through bureaucracy. After the death of Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, 1898, his vision to elevate the Mohammedan Anglo-Oriental College was kept alive and fulfilled by Aga Khan III through a nationwide fundraising and awareness campaign stretching almost a decade from 1910 to 1920, eventually culminating into the formation of Aligarh Muslim University. Aga Khan III was appointed as the first pro-chancellor and continued to support the university through his generous grants. Through this university, he not only envisioned education but character building of Muslims, and deemed it a necessary platform for promoting intellectual development.

Aga Khan III had a multifaceted personality; he authored books, served as the first Muslim president of a predecessor of the United Nations type body, the League of Nations, and helped build schools such as Diamond Jubilee schools which still operate in Gilgit-Baltistan.

To sir with love: Aga Khan III – a tireless advocate for female education

It was his political and educational vision for Muslims and practical efforts to institutionalise these two aspects through a party and university respectively proved to be the two pillars upon which the entire Pakistan Movement was built and launched. His efforts were rewarded when Pakistan ultimately came into being. His Independence Day message for Pakistan is as fresh and relevant as it was back then, and is a beacon of light even today for the entire nation:

Pakistan is now an accomplished fact but our work now begins. If the Muslims were depressed by the misfortunes of the last 200 years throughout the world, now, at last, the wheel of fortune has turned and we are no longer justified in being either half-hearted or pessimistic.

We must, with an our energy, heart and soul with faith in Islam and trust in God, work for the present and future glory of Pakistan and give help to the unfortunate Muslims who still suffer under foreign dominion. We must work for a better world, and be no more hypnotised by the dead glories of the distant past, or by the misfortunes of the near past.
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 5:26 am    Post subject: Diamond Jubilee of Mowlana Sultan Muhammad Shah Reply with quote

AS RECEIVED

Memories of Diamond Jubilee of Imam Sultan Mohamed Shah



10th August 1946 – 10th August 2016

Remember the date and place? – An Incomparable Occasion in the world.

A community of about 100,000 Ismailis in Africa at that time weighed their Imam in Diamonds. 70,000 Ismailis from all parts of Africa – and 30,000 from other places gathered in Dar es Salaam for this unique occasion. Dar es Salaam was not a big city – limited accommodation – hotels – transport facilities etc. But for Ismailis it was not a problem. It was our beloved Imam's Diamond Jubilee.

Here are some of my personal memories: -

We were young but really excited and enthusiastic to share in this historic occasion. All the students of Aga Khan Schools – both Boys and Girls donated money from their pocket expenses and enough money was collected and a Gold casket was presented to our beloved Imam from the students of Aga Khan Schools both Boys and Girls. We were in Standard 9th at that time and our class decided to issue a magazine for this unique occasion. There were talented students in our class and with their cooperation and the support of our Ismaili Business people we managed to publish a magazine called AZAD – and it contained articles of our school activities- Ismaili history – etc. And it was for all of us at that young age a very big achievement. The whole city of Dar es Salaam specially all the Ismaili houses were lit with decorative electric lights and the night time view of the city looked as if heaven was on the earth. There were Archs – what we used to call Taak- on every corner of downtown Dar.

An amusement park was constructed in the Jubilee grounds where all sorts of activities took place.
A temporary mini train was brought from South Africa and people both young and old enjoyed taking ride.

A temporary theater was built with a proper stage and lighting and every night there were Geet and Garba performance for the entertainment of the Jamat. Some Indian films were also shown in the theater. To accommodate all those who could find accommodation – a huge camp with proper temporary facilities was built. To cook for thousands of people was a big problem but for Ismailis - with their staunch faith and the blessings of our beloved Imam everything worked out well.

Now read the detailed write up of this glorious occasion with historical photos. Make sure that your children know this part of our history.

We have observed the Golden Jubilee of our present Imam and inshallah next year we will observe the Diamond Jubilee but the times are different and the joy, excitement and feelings are the same but the way the occasion is celebrated may be different.

THE DIAMOND JUBILEE – SIXTY YEARS OF IMAMAT
(1885-1945)


Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah in a message to the Aga Khan Legion Central Committee: -

"Sixty years have passed to the enthronement of the Imamat, which is a unique occasion. It is an incomparable occasion in the world. No occasion ever occurred in the world history like it."

Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah in a message to the Diamond Jubilee Souvenir: -

The Ismaili history has passed through several stages of development. My Diamond Jubilee marks such a stage in the present times. With it a phase of consolidation and co-operation has been achieved among my spiritual children in various countries, and now lies ahead a period of goodwill and expansion. With the Diamond Jubilee dawns a new era, full of hopes and opportunities for economics, educational, social and religious uplift of my beloved spiritual children all over the world. It is a time to go ahead and leave a mark on the world history like the glorious Ismailis of the past. Let the Diamond Jubilee message for my spiritual children be that of doing their best and devoting their best in the best cause of their beloved faith….

The Aga Khan speaking at the Diamond Jubilee Celebrations in Dar-es-Salaam. From Madagascar to Central Asia, Ismaili pilgrims converged on the city for the weighing ceremony on August 10, 1946 in Dar-es-Salaam. Five months earlier many saw a similar weighing in Bombay. Both ceremonies raised over 640,000 British pounds each in the Aga Khan’s weight against diamonds.

Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah, Aga Khan III, writing in his Memoirs of Aga Khan: -

The sixtieth anniversary of my inheriting my Imamat and ascending the “Gadi” fell in 1945. But in the troubled conditions at the end of the Second World War it was neither possible nor suitable to arrange any elaborate celebrations of my Diamond Jubilee. We decided to have two ceremonies: one, including the weighing against Diamonds, in Bombay in March 1946, and another five months later, in Dar-es-Salaam, using the same diamonds.

When the time came, world conditions were only just beginning to improve…my followers gathered for a wonderful, and to me at least, quite an unforgettable occasion. There were Ismailis present from all over the Near and Middle East, from Central Asia and China; from Syria and Egypt; and from Burma and Malaya, as well as thousands of my Indian followers. Telegrams and letters of congratulation showered in on me from all over the Islamic world, from the heads of all the independent Muslim nations, and from the viceroy; I was proud and happy man to be thus reunited with those for whom across the years my affection and my responsibility have been so deep and so constant….

Sixty years of the benevolent reign of Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah, Aga Khan III, gave his followers a chance to celebrate his Diamond Jubilee. On December 31, 1945, while speaking to his community’s Legion Central Committee, the Aga Khan said: -

“Sixty years have passed to the enthronement of the Imamat, which is a unique occasion. It is an incomparable occasion in the world. No occasion ever occurred in the world history like it.”

Ten years earlier the Ismailis had marked the Golden Jubilee by weighing their Imam in gold - the sum of which was presented to the Imam only to be returned to them for their economic growth.

The Ismailis saw an opportunity to celebrate the jubilee like they had done before, and this time weighing their Imam in diamonds. Two weighing ceremonies were set for 1946 – the first one in Bombay, on March 10th and the second exactly five months later, on August 10th, in Dar-es-Salaam.

At his residence in Bombay, Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah examines some of the diamonds before the day of the Diamond Jubilee Ceremony at Bombay’s Brabourne Stadium.

THE DIAMOND JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS IN BOMBAY AND DAR-ES-SALAAM; A DIAMOND JUBILEE SPEECH IN DAR-ES-SALAAM; SOME DIAMOND JUBILEE PROJECTS

1.Bombay, Braboune Stadium, 10th March 1946

At a quarter past five on the afternoon of Sunday, March 10, 1946, a deep hush fell upon the Brabourne Stadium in Bombay. Here over 100,000 people, from various parts of the world had come to witness one of those magnificent ceremonies which arouse wonder and amazement in the minds of men. It was on this day, and at this hour, that His Highness the Aga Khan was to be weighed in diamonds to celebrate the sixtieth year of his Imamat. Seldom before can Bombay, even in its pageantry and glory, have looked upon such pompous ceremonies, such splendour and colour. Vast congregations of people lined the routes and filled the great stands surrounding the central platform and figure. The huge multitude present in the ceremony included fourteen ruling princes, among them the Maharajas of Kashmir and Baroda and the Jam Saheb of Nawanagar.

Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah with Begum Om Habiba, Mata Salalmat, and Prince Sadruddin at a Mulaqat with the Karimabad Jamat during his Diamond Jubilee visit to Bombay.

The flags waved and the colours of His Highness – green and red – draped the buildings. For hours before the event the procession passed through the streets of Bombay to the Stadium to await the arrival, first of all, of the high notabilities and personalities who had come to pay homage and to look upon the magnificent spectacle, and then at 5.15 the Aga Khan with his retinue preceded by Her Highness the Begum Om Habiba Mata Salamat, wearing diamond studded sari, gems glittering in the gorgeous sunlight, strode into the arena, mounted the platform and took his place.

The value of diamonds was 640,000 British pounds at the Bombay weighing ceremony attended by 100,000 people. Photo: Jehangir Merchant collection

One by one the caskets of diamonds were raised on high and shown to the public, then placed on the scales. The scales tipped when 243k lbs. weight of diamonds were so placed. These diamonds were worth 640,000 British Pounds – a gift to His Highness from his many followers in India. His Highness received the gift and in his turn returned it, adding his blessing and his advice that the large sum of money should be used for the betterment of his followers.

Later that night, a magnificent display of fireworks was given at the sea-front.

Intriguing Poster designed by Major Lakhpaty as a personal initiative for the Diamond Jubilee. Photo: Abdulmalik Thawer Collection . Please also see feature article related to the poster.

In a message to Diamond Jubilee Souvenir Year Book, Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah said: -

“The Ismailia history has passed through several stages of development. My Diamond Jubilee marks such a stage in the present times. With it a phase of consolidation and co-operation has been achieved among my spiritual children in various countries, and now lies ahead a period of goodwill and expansion. With the Diamond Jubilee dawns a new era, full of hopes and opportunities for economics, educational, social and religious uplift of my beloved spiritual children all over the world. It is a time to go ahead and leave a mark on the world history like the glorious Ismailis of the past. Let the Diamond Jubilee message for my spiritual children be that of doing their best and devoting their best in the best cause of their beloved faith.”

2. Dar-es-Salaam: 10 August 1946

From The Khojas:


The flash of diamonds – thousands of diamonds – in small hermetically sealed glass containers, tantalized the huge gathering seated around the high platform erected in the middle of grounds that had been converted into “Diamondabad” in the city of Dar-es-Salaam…. The crowd watched spellbound as container after container put on the scale shook the hand and forced it upwards…

Fezzed Tanganyika Police Keep Order and Guard a Fabulous Diamond Treasure. Photo: Motani Collection, Ottawa. Photo, not as clear, also appeared in the National Geographic, March 1947.

The Diamond Jubilee celebrations in Dar-es-Salaam followed in August, 1946. Thousands of people came from all parts of the world, especially India, Europe and the Middle East. Hundreds made the journey by air, thousands by train, by car and by lorry, from all parts of Africa, many enduring hardships as they travelled from Belgian Congo and Uganda. Convoys of cars came from South Africa.The specially chartered mail boat, S.S. Vasna, flying the Ismaili flag, brought many thousands of Ismailis to Dar-es-Salaam. The celebrations lasted 10 days, opening with a ceremony in which Her Highness the Begum, accompanied by Lady Battershill, cut the tape at the official opening of the Jubilee Exhibition Park. Here there were pavilions showing fine needlework and other forms of local craftsmanship, including paintings, woodwork and toy-making. Other pavilions were on health, hygiene, child welfare and domestic science, and others catered to Scout and Girl Guide displays.The lighter side of the Exhibition took on the features of a grand country fair. Merry-go-rounds and miniature railways delighted the young and kept the old entertained. A day was also dedicated to a large procession, which included decorated floats, and a portrayal of the history and activities of the Ismailis.

Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah speaks into a “Mike” at the Diamond Jubilee celebrations in Dar-es-Salaam. His weight in diamonds was the equivalent of over 640,000 Britsh pounds Photo: David Carnegie for the National Geographic, March 1947.

However the highlight of the celebrations had to be the morning of August 10, 1946 when 70 000 pairs of eyes, mesmerised by the hand on the large round dial of an enormous weighing scale, watched as it inched its way up and up. The flash of diamonds – thousands of diamonds – in small hermetically sealed glass containers, tantalised the huge gathering seated around the high platform erected in the middle of grounds that had been converted into Diamondabad in the city of Dar-es-Salaam.

The first boxes of diamonds were placed on the scales by those who had contributed the highest amounts…Following this there were presentations by school children, bearing banners from all the African territories.

The crowd watched spellbound as container after container put on the scale shook the hand and forced it upwards. Some craned their necks, others squinted, and all focused on the dial, willing more and more diamonds onto the scale as the hand moved clockwise, very slowly towards its target – the weight of the regal person seated at the end of the platform, serenely awaiting the outcome. The Imam’s weight in diamonds would represent a fortune and the weighing-in was a sumptuous display of wealth, power and charity in one spectacular event.

Ismailis from all parts of the world sat tense with suppressed excitement. Finally the weight on the scale matched the weight of the Imam and a tremendous cheer broke from their lips in praise of their leader on the platform, His Highness, Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan. He had succeeded to the Imamat at the age of eight in 1885 and they were celebrating his sixtieth anniversary as Imam.

Bulletproof caskets of transparent plastic rest on the scale. These contain industrial diamonds on loan from London for the weighing. The setting was Dar es Salaam, Tanganyika, East Africa, a stronghold of the Ismailis. Scarlet-robed members of the Aga Khan Legion surround the Imam. Photo: National Geographic, March 1947

The Aga Khan, moved by this presentation, explained how the gift would be used.

“As everyone is well aware, the value of these diamonds has been unconditionally presented to me on this occasion. I do not wish to take this money for myself but to use it for any object that I think is best for my spiritual children. After long reflection, I have come to the conclusion that the very best use that I can make of it is that after expenses of these celebrations, in the wider sense of the word, have been paid for, then the whole of the residue must be given as an absolute gift to the Diamond Jubilee Investment Trust.”

March 10 1946: “A dark eyed beauty” was how the National Geographic described this lady in a caption, adding that “her tolerant leader champions women’s education; opposes their segregation in purdah.” Photo: David Carnegie, National Geographic, March 1947

He told them that the Diamond Jubilee Investment Trust had been created to build up “a totally new financial outlook among the Ismailis. Co-operative Societies, Corporations, and, I hope and believe very soon, Building Societies, too, will draw from the Investment Trust sums equal to their capital but at a level of three per cent. And they are not allowed to charge more than six per cent under any conditions from their borrowers.”

With this internal banking system, the Aga Khan was setting up the means to ensure financial security for all his people. Stirred by his wisdom and his concern for them, his followers felt reaffirmed in their faith and in their leader. It was an occasion each individual would cherish forever.

After the weighing-in, the Aga Khan joined his family on the dais where the ceremony continued with speeches and special acknowledgment of the outstanding work of individual Ismailis in the fields of health, education and economic development in various communities throughout the world.

Obverse of a medal commemorating the Diamond Jubilee of Aga Khan III. Photo: Nizar Noorali Collection, Pakistan.

Reverse of a medal commemorating the Diamond Jubilee of Aga Khan III. Photo: Nizar Noorali Collection, Pakistan.

3. Speech, The Folly of Hate and Fear, Dar-es-Salaam, on August 10, 1946, at the Exhibition Theatre

Now one word, if I may be allowed to say it, of general advice to inhabitants here, whatever their race, colour or creed.

I have had some experience of the causes of strife and I was a very active member of the League of Nations and of the Disarmament Conference for some seven years. Why did it fail? Ultimately because of hate. And yet why did people hate each other? Fear. Where there is fear there is no love, but hate easily enters through the windows even if the door is shut.

I appeal to all of you, Africans, Europeans and Indians — do not fear each other. Work together. The country is big enough. There is virgin soil which has hardly been scratched. Unlike China, India and Europe, the population is still very small. We have no need to struggle for existence here for a century at least, so why foresee trouble for your great-grandchildren. There may be none. Thanks to the atom bomb and the progress of knowledge and science. And if things take a turn for good instead of evil, then the new forces of nature, we are certain, will make human relations easier and give each and all security.

To-day, strife here on racial lines is imaginary. The onlooker sees most of the game, and I have been here an onlooker. There is no getting away from it — if you will throw fear out of your minds and you will soon realise that white, black and brown are complementary members of a common body politic.

4. Diamond Jubilee Projects.

His Highness the Aga Khan speaking at the Aga Khan Academy Foundation Ceremony, Karimabad, Hunza, May 13, 1983: -

My Silver Jubilee is a celebration of years which have passed, but it is fitting that it should be commemorated by laying foundations for the future. As Ahmedali Merchant has reminded us, it was here that My Grandfather, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan, initiated our education network for the Northern Areas. He did this with faith in the future. It therefore gives Me great pleasure that today we are inaugurating a completely new development in the system he originated…

Wrote Pakistan’s Dawn Newspaper:

…The single-most important factor that transformed the educational scene in Hunza was the contribution of Aga Khan III, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah. It was in 1946 that some 16 schools were established. They were called the Diamond Jubilee schools and they set the right momentum for bringing changes to education in Hunza….

(a) What is now known as the Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya was incorporated in 1946 as the Diamond Jubilee Investment Trust (DJIT) to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of the ascension to the Imamat by the late Aga Khan III. DJIT’s shares were subscribed by the Ismaili Community as well as the Aga Khan.

Diamond Jubilee Plaque from Dar-es-Salaam celebrations…one of the memorabilia at Upanga Jamatkhana in the city. As the plaque states, the Imam wished the amount to be dedicated to Jamati projects including the Diamond Jubilee Investment Trust. Photo Al-Karim Pirani Collection, Ottawa

(b) In 1947, following India’s Independence from the British, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah, Aga Khan III, established the Diamond Jubilee High School for Boys. Over the years, the School has established itself as an institution offering quality education to children of varied backgrounds and cultures.

(c) The Diamond Jubilee High School in Hyderabad, a co-educational English medium school, currently educates 1040 students from pre-primary through grade 10. The Primary School is situated at Nampally Station Road while the main school building is located at Chirag Ali Lane, beside the Collectorate office. The School was established in 1949 by the Youngmen Ismailia Education Board.

(d) Those who are familiar with the difficult terrain and relatively scarce resources in Hunza would be pleasantly surprised to know that the literacy rate in Hunza is around 77 per cent. This must have been unthinkable when the first primary school was established there in 1913 by the British in India. The single-most important factor that transformed the educational scene in Hunza was the contribution of Aga Khan III, Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah, who convinced the then Mirs of Hunza state to place greater emphasis on education.

It was in 1946 that some 16 schools were established. They were called the Diamond Jubilee schools and they set the right momentum for bringing changes to education in Hunza. Diamond Jubilee Schools for girls were also set up throughout the remote Northern Areas of Pakistan. In addition, scholarship programmes established at the time of the Golden Jubilee to give assistance to needy students were progressively expanded.

A portion of the vast crowds of over 70,000 who saw the Diamond Jubilee weighing ceremony.
Lady Battershill and Her Highness the begum Aga Khan cutting the ribbon during the opening ceremony at the Exhibition.

Her Highness the Begum Aga Khan wearing the sari studded with 1,500 diamonds, worth over 45,000 pounds, with Prince Sadruddin, the second son of His Highness the Aga Khan.

Just after His Highness the Aga Khan's weight was matched against the diamonds in the foreground, a deafening cheer went up from the crowd of over 70,000 present.

The specially chartered mailboat, S.S. "Vasna", which brought many thousands of Ismailis to Dar-es-Salaam on its many trips.

Celebrating the Life of Hazrat Mowlana Sultan Muhammad Shah (Alayhis salaam)

“The Ismaili history has passed through several stages of development. My Diamond Jubilee marks such a stage in the present times. With it a phase of consolidation and co co- operation has been achieved among my spiritual children in various countries, and now lies ahead a period of goodwill and expansion. With the Diamond Jubilee dawns a new era, full of hopes and opportunities for economics, educational, social and religious uplift of my beloved spiritual children all over the world. It is a time to go ahead and leave a mark on the world history like the glorious Ismailis of the past. Let the Diamond Jubilee message for my spiritual children be that of doing their best and devoting their best in the best cause of their beloved faith
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:29 am    Post subject: The Tolerance of Islam 6 November 1951 Aga Khan III Reply with quote

When The Times of London made unfair allegations against Islam and the Muslims in a leading article on 22 October 1951, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III sent a spirited reply which was published in The Times 6 November 1951 issue.

‘The Tolerance of Islam’, Reply to The Times of London (London, United Kingdom)

6 November 1951

In your leading article of October 22 [1951] under the heading “The Middle East” you have stated that “in the Muslim countries the second tendency (a violent reaction against the West) is exaggerated by an intolerant religion which teaches the duty as shunning foreign influences.” This sweeping generalization, not only against Muslims but against their faith and Islam itself, is both untrue and unfair, and, indeed, shows a lamentable dearth of knowledge regarding Islam and its legal and religious principles, even among leading writers of the leading journals of the West.

Even a little knowledge of Islam will show that its religion is not only tolerant of other faiths, but most respectful, and, indeed, fully accepts the divine inspiration of all theistic faiths that came before Islam. It does not only teach tolerance to its followers, but goes a step further and enjoins on them all to create the godly quality of Hilm, that is, tolerance, forbearance, patience, calmness, and forgiveness. It is due to the spirit of tolerance of Islam that even the smallest Christian and Jewish minorities survived and kept all their doctrines during the thousand years of Muslim rule. Nothing like what happened to Muslims in Spain after the Christian conquest has ever happened to a non-Muslim faith in any Islamic dominion.

How can Europeans be so ignorant as to have forgotten that in the first century of Islam the Khalifas ordered that all that was best in Greek and Roman cultures should be assimilated; that not only the philosophy, medicine, and science of Greece but its poetry and drama were carefully translated into Arabic and were generally sought not only by the learned but also by the pious?

The Muslim attitude towards the absorption of ideas was based on the principle of Islam which enjoins to acquire knowledge wherever available, and there is a well-known and authentic saying of the Prophet that “his followers should seek learning even if they have to go to China.” Islam, by its geographical position, suffered the terrible Mongol invasions one after the other, just at the time when it was weakened by the long and immense efforts with which it had mastered the many successive crusades. It should not be forgotten that the Tartar invasions came one generation after the other. In fact, in the interest of the universal unification of mankind the Qur’an ignores the minor differences and says: “Come, let us unite to what is common to us all”, which obviously encourages Muslims to assimilate ideas and even customs from others.

It is, of course, true that Muslim countries, like modern European races, have acquired in this century a strong sense of nationalism which has no connection with their religion. As such, if there has been violent reaction against the West in some of the Muslim countries, the reason is to be found in the attitude and behavior of the Westerners, their ignorance and want of respect for the faith and culture of Islam, of which the reference to that faith in your leading article is a typical and usual example. Only recently I was in all the Muslim States where there is a so-called anti-Western agitation, and I have no hesitation in saying that if the Atlantic nations and the West generally wants better relationship with the Muslims, the solution lies in their own hands, and this can be done only if they change their mental attitude and cultivate better understanding of the Muslims’ material needs and loyal recognition of the high quality of their national culture and the purity of their faith.

His Highness the Aga Khan III
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Remembering heroes

AS we are celebrating 70 years of Independence, it is but natural that coherent efforts should be made to disseminate information and knowledge to our young generation about heroes of Pakistan Movement. Focus on founder of the country Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah and great philosopher Allama Dr Muhammad Iqbal is understandable but a comprehensive programme needs to be chalked out to highlight the role of other heroes as well.

In this background, Archaeological and Historical Association of Pakistan and Preston University deserve credit for arranging a function to celebration birth anniversary of Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan-III, a veteran of Pakistan Movement and founder President of All India Muslim League. He was visionary leader who not only worked for political rights of Muslims of South Asia but also championed the cause of education, health, social development and women’s rights. Historians say his views on education, elucidated at the Muslim Educational Conference in 1904 in Bombay, still resonate today. While appreciating efforts to highlight his life and achievements, we would urge both the Government and the civil society to take concrete measures to project life and contribution of other heroes of Pakistan Movement for the benefit of our young generation. This is because Pakistan is an ideological state and it would be as strong as its foundations, which rest in our ideology, values, norms and culture. We appreciate that Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Maryam Aurangzeb has galvanized different departments of the ministry because of her commitment and vision. Similarly, Advisor to the Prime Minister Ifran Siddiqui has done more for literature, heritage and culture during a short span of time than others did collectively in the past. However, much needs to be done and all those engaged in the noble mission of transferring the knowledge and heritage to next generations must be appreciated and supported.

https://pakobserver.net/remembering-heroes/
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://worldtribunepakistan.com/2017/10/31/sir-aga-khans-contribution-in-pakistan-movement-1906-1947/

Friday , November 3, 2017

Sir Aga Khan’s contribution in Pakistan Movement 1906-1947

10 hours ago

By Prof. Dr. Riaz Ahmad

High Highness Sir Sultan Muhammed Shah, Aga Khan III GCSI GCMG GCIE GCVO PC was the 48th Imam of the Ismaili community. He was the first President of the All-India Muslim League. He was born in Karachi on 2 November 1877, but died in Versoix, Switzerland on 11 July 1957. After Sir Syed Khan, he played a leading role not only in strengthening the political role of the Muslims of the Indo-Pak subcontinent, the cause of Aligarh Muslim University but the Pakistan Movement also. He was in close liaison with the Quaid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah, the Founder of Pakistan in all the critical moments of the Movement.

Aga Khan leads Simla Deputation to Lord Minto, 1 Oct. 1906
For starting the political role of the Muslims of British India, the Simla Deputation to Lord Minto, the Viceroy, on 1 October 1906 headed by Sir Aga Khan III did play a pivotal role. This Deputation consisted of 35 leading Muslim leaders from all parts of British India. This was considered as the first all-India Muslim gathering under the leadership of Sir Aga Khan which was representative of all the provinces, regions and parts of British India. In his memorandum Sir Aga Khan presented the Muslim demands of grant of separate electorates to the Muslims under the new reforms and pleaded permission from the British Government to allow the Muslims of India to form their own political party. Lord Minto, in his address, responded positively and promised to redress the Muslim demands under the new reforms. It was in consequence of this that the All India Muslim League was formed at Dhakka on 30 December 1906, at a meeting of the All India Mohammedan Educational Conference presided over by NawabViqar-ul-Mulk on a motion of NawabSalimullah for the purpose of protecting the political and other interests of Muslims of British India.

First President of All India Muslim League 1908-1913
First meeting of the All India Muslim League was held at Aligarh on 18-19 March 1908. In this meeting it was announced that HH Sir Aga Khan III has donated Rs.500/- for the Muslim League fund out which Rs. 50/- were credited to the account of the League as the admission and membership fees. It was at this session that Sir Aga Khan III was unanimously elected as first President of the All India Muslim League. Second session of the AIML was held at Amritsar in December 1908. At this session also it was announced that the HH Aga Khan, permanent President of the party, donated Rs. 1500/- for the Muslim League fund. Actually, Presidents of the Party were of two kinds. First there was the permanent President who was elected for three years. The other pattern was that some prominent Muslim leaders of the country was asked to preside over the session, but his position was temporary and honorary.

HH Sir Aga Khan, the permanent President, presided over the 3rd session of AIML held at Delhi on 29-30 January 1910. He delivered a long presidential address in which he surveyed the current political situation and guided the Muslims how to move forward in advancing their demands. In a resolution passed by this session the Muslim League unanimously adopted the following resolution in which Sir Agan’s services to the cause of the Muslims were thus appreciated: “The All India Muslim League palces on records its appreciation of the great services rendered to the Mohammedan cause by His Highness the Aga Khan, GCIE, and assues him of its continued confidence and trust in his statesmanship and in his leadership of the Musalmans of India”. Sir Aga Khan was also present at the 4th session of AIML held at Nagpur, 28 and 30 December 1910 and presided over the deliberations. The honorary President Syed Nabiullah delivered the presidential address. The 5th session of AIML was held at Calcutta, on 3-4 March 1912. Honorary president of this session was Bawab Sir Salimullah of Dhakkawho delivered his presidential address. At this session also the services of HH Aga Khan for the “cause of Mohammedans” were highly appreciated. It was at this session that HH Aga Khan was elected for the second tenure as President, AIML.

Since 1912, Quaid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah had started his efforts for the Hindu-Muslim unity. Though he was not member of the AIML before 1913, he was invited to attend the meeting of the AIML Council on instructions from the Aga Khan by the Secretary of the AIML Syed Wazir Hasan. It was at this meeting under the presidentship HH Sir Aga Khan that
the AIML adopted its new policy of “self-government suitable to India” on a motion by Quaid-i-Azam. It was ratified by the next session held in March 1913. HH the Aga Khan also attended the next 7th session of AIML held at Agra on 30-31 December 1013 where the Hon. President was Sir Ibrahim Rahimtullah, a Bombay business magnate, who delivered is presidential address. HH the Aga Khan, as President of the Party, himself moved a resolution for the creation of “Muslim National Fund” whose aimwas the “the political progress and advancement of Musalmans” at every provincial level. This resolution was passed with great “acclamation”. Seconding this resolution the Raja of Mahmudabad appreciated the vision of HH the Aga Khan. In matters of discussion on other resolutions also, the presence of HH Aga Khan had sobering effect on the proceedings of the Muslim League. Thereafter, HH the Aga Khan resigned from the presidentship of the AIML. Despite his resignation from the AIML, HH the Aga Khan had close contact with Jinnah especially during his efforts for the Hindu-Muslim unity during 1914-1916.

His Contribution in the Pakistan Movement: Sir Aga Khan was also the president of the All Parties Muslim Conference held in 1928-29. During 1930-33, he also attended the Round Table Conferences held in London for settling the future of the Muslims as delegate. Quaid-i-Azam was also attended the first two conferences in London. Both jointly pleaded the cause of the Muslims. They were very close to each other and were in regulation private and confidential correspondence, apart from the participation in the committees of the RTCs in London. They share a lot of private consulationregaring the future of the Muslims. Sir Aga Khan’s letters of 20 January 1931, 29 March 1931, 20 June 1931and many others indicate the kind of consulation both had regarding the future of the Muslims before going to different sessions of the RTC. This showed that both the leaders were highly confiding with each other and jointly making strategy regarding the future of the Muslims in British India.

He was nominated to represent India at the League of Nations in 1932, where he continued to work until the outbreak of the World War II. He was an excellent statesman and was elected President of the League of Nations (now known as the United Nations Organization) in July 1937. He was the only Asian to have been appointed to this high office.

During the Pakistan Sir Aga khan signally contributed towards the Pakistan Movement. Quaid-i-Azam and Sir Aga Khan were regularly in contact with each other for the furthering of the Pakistan Movement. Even when the AIML became united about the time when the Pakistan Movement was to be started and 24th session of AIML held in Bombay on 11-12 1936 exhibiting the unity of the Muslim Conference and the All India Muslim League the contribution of Sir Aga Khan was thus recorded: “There was no person in India except His Highness the Aga Khan who could make all the parties unite on one platform”.

During 1940 – 1947 at all the critical times, Quaid-i-Azam and Sir Aga Khan had close contact with each other and had a lot of consultation with each other on the issues such as Gandhi-Jinnah Talks, Cabinet Mission Plan and the Partition issues during May-August 1947. Thus Sir Aga Khan signally contributed towards the Pakistan Movement.

Sir Aga Khan fell ill in 1954 during his visit to Dhaka and from then on struggling with ill health, passed away on 11 July 1957, in Switzerland and is buried in Aswan, Egypt. On the occasion of his birth anniversary on 02 November, we pay tribute to a great Muslim leader by renewing our pledge to make Pakistan a prosperous and advanced country.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sir Aga Khan III: Remembering a great Muslim leader | Express Tribune

https://epaper.tribune.com.pk/DisplayDetails.aspx?ENI_ID=11201711030119&EN_ID=11201711030074&EMID=11201711030018

Aga Khan III remembered on birth anniversary



By SABIHA NIZAR

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah—one of the leading figures in the independence movement of Pakistan and was the 48th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims—was born in Karachi on November 2 in 1877.

As a statesman, he held various positions of influence and importance which included him being the founding president of All India Muslim League (AIML), the founding chancellor of Aligarh Muslim University, president of the General Assembly of the League of Nations – the forerunner of present-day United Nations, representative of Indian Muslims in the Imperial Legislative Council, member of the Privy Council and as delegate to the first Round Table Conference amongst other forums, building a case of Muslim cause and that of independence.

He also played a significant role in the Simla Delegation which demanded separate electorates for the Muslims of British India in 1906. The demands were successfully accepted through Morley-Minto Reforms, a key milestone around which Muslims organised themselves under the banner of AIML, which Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah presided over for its first six years of inception.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah’s voice was well received among the power corridors of the world in general, and in Britain in particular where he was honoured with the title of Knight Commander of the Indian Empire (prefixed to Sir).

The life of Agha Khan III is a true epitome of the word sultan (which literally means a king or a ruler), a name his father Hasan Ali Shah gave to him at the time of his birth, predicting that his son will attain a distinguished position in the world and play his role in the international affairs.

All major countries of the world recognised and bestowed him with highest honours because of his immense work in the fields raising human capital, social inclusion and socio-economic development.

From his early childhood, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah was brought up with an excellent education, including languages and religion.

Starting with oriental languages of Arabic, Persian, Urdu and Hindi he had complete command over English, French and German. In terms of fields of study, he learned the Quran and Hadith, and his European tutors taught him science, mathematics and philosophy. Apart from being politically active throughout his life, he worked for the welfare of societies and communities, particularly in India and Africa.

Education and health were his priorities, and he considered lack of modern education as the reason, the Muslims were lagging behind the rest of the world – the idea shared equally by Sir Syed Ahmed Khan as well. He took a keen interest in architecture and worked towards repairs and constructions of mosques throughout the world.

He also authored two books, India in Transition and an autobiography Memoirs of Aga Khan. These books provide a glimpse into his life, his various intense ventures and travels, political upheavals in the midst of and post-World War I and II era, his interactions with the royal family of Britain and his insights into life, happiness, purpose of education, religion and its values, social services and civil institutions.

During his Jubilee celebrations, marking 50, 60 and 70 years of his reign as the Imam, his followers showered him with gold and diamond.

The funds raised through the celebrations were used for social development spanning South Asia and Africa. In terms of education alone, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah built over 200 schools in the twentieth century, and the legacy is carried forward by the present day institution of AKDN (Aga Khan Development Network) and the AKES (Aga Khan Education Services).

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah spent last days of his illustrious life at Barkat Villa, Geneva and died on July 11, 1957, passing the beacon to Prince Shah Karim Al-Hussaini, the present day Aga Khan IV. His resting place is in Aswan area of Egypt in the mausoleum of Aga Khan overlooking the Nile. The New York Times reported his departure these words, “The Aga Khan III’s death leaves our contemporary world just a little less colourful it was.”

As Sir Samuel Hoare aptly puts it, “The Aga Khan does not belong to one community or one country. He is a citizen of the world par excellence.”

https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2017/11/02/aga-khan-iii-remembered-on-birth-anniversary/

*****
Speakers eulogize services of Aga Khan, his family for establishment, development of Pakistan

Zubair Qureshi

Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III, known as the Aga Khan III, was the undisputed leader of the Muslims of the united India, and it was he who back in early 1900s realized that Muslims were being exploited by the Hindu majority in India and in order to achieve their rights, they would have to part ways with All India National Congress sooner or later and make their own political party.

Thus he along with 35 prominent leaders of the Muslims of the subcontinent after a number of meetings founded All India Muslim League. Sir Aga Khan III was also the founder President of the party.

Governor Punjab Malik Rafique Rajwana shared the above-mentioned facts related to Pakistan’s history with the audience at a ceremony organized jointly by the Archeological & Historical Association of Pakistan and the Preston University here on Thursday to celebrate the 140th Birth Anniversary of the great leader of the Muslims of India. Rajwana was addressing the ceremony as Chief Guest.

Governor Punjab also referred to the first address of Aga Khan after assuming as President of the party. The address reflects the poor state of the Muslims of India and Sir Aga Khan vowed to lift them out of poverty and backwardness. The ceremony at Preston University auditorium was also addressed by Founder Chairman of the Hashoo Group Sadruddin Hashwani, Chancellor of the Preston University Dr Abdul Basit, Chairman Archeological & Historical Association of Pakistan Dr Ghazanfar Mehdi, eminent scholar Dr Ahmed, Mr Murtaza Hashwani, Naeem Akram Qureshi, and Air Commodore (R) Naunehal Shah.

Addressing the ceremony Sadruddin Hashwani said correspondence among Quaid-e-Azam, Allama Iqbal and Sir Aga Khan are the rare manuscripts of historic value and they should be sorted out and preserved by the government.

He also announced Rs10 million for the poor and the needy students of the Preston University.

Chancellor of the Preston University Dr Basit said highlighting achievements of our national heroes was a part of the university’s manifesto and the university would continue to contribute in that direction.
He briefed the audience about the research work so far done on the Movement for Pakistan and the leaders of the Movement.

https://pakobserver.net/speakers-eulogize-services-aga-khan-family-establishment-development-pakistan/

****
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is so sad that our leadership and ITREB toataly forgot to celebrate the birth day of MSMS. How come our youth will be able to know about the achievements of this historical and dynamic figure of 19/20th century. There was a time when in Jks lectures were arranged on 2nd November his birth date, not any more!!
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan 3 speech

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[Oct 6]Today in history: Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III delivered the adjournment session of the League of Nations

“Indeed, all the problems that fall to the League may ultimately be reduced to one – that of man, and the dignity of man. It is in that sense that the work of the League assumes its true significance and acquires its permanent value. The tribulations of one people are the tribulations of all. That which weakens one weakens all. That which is a gain to one is surely a gain to all. This is no empty ideal. It is a veritable compass to guide aright the efforts of statesmen in every country and of all men of goodwill who, desiring the good of their own people, desire the good of the whole world.”

“The Task Before the League of Nations”
Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III, Geneva, Switzerland
October 6, 1937

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/nimirasblog.wordpress.com/2018/10/06/oct-6today-in-history-sir-sultan-muhammad-shah-aga-khan-iii-delivered-the-adjournment-session-of-the-league-of-nations/
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today in History: 1937, October 6 - Mowlana Sultan Mohamed Shah made a Presidential Review at the Adjournment of the 18th session of the League of Nations at Geneva. He said, "The tribulations of one people are the tribulations of all. That which weakens one weakens all. That which is a gain to one is surely a gain to all. This is no empty ideal..."

[Full speech] http://ismaili.net/sultan/sms03/league4.html

https://www.facebook.com/IsmailiHeritage/photos/a.1535104660095302/2160653894207039/?type=3&theater
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah remembered on 61st death anniversary

Born on November 2, 1877 in Karachi, Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah the 48th hereditary Imam of the Shia Imami Ismailis is one of the most prominent figures who worked towards the independence of Pakistan besides bringing educational reforms in the sub-continent.

Throughout his lifetime, his remarkable work for the betterment of not only the Ismaili community, but also the Muslim Ummah and all of humanity has been widely recognised.

He was bestowed as the Imam of the Shia Imami Ismailis while being educated by European trainers as well as gaining expertise in the Quran and Hadith in his early years. When he turned 19, he paid his first visit to the Mohammedan Anglo-Oriental (MAO) College in Aligarh where he was welcomed wholeheartedly.

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https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2018/11/02/sir-sultan-mohammed-shah-remembered-on-61st-death-anniversary/
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Bridge Between
Two Epochs


This awe inspiring extraordinary book, celebrates the glorious life of His Highness Aga Khan III, 48th Imam Hazrat Mawlana Sultan Muhammad Shah al-Husayni, A.S.

This unique special limited edition book bridges the gap between many dimensions of life. From the physical to spiritual advancement, the dignity of life for all to women’s equality and self discovery.

It is a unique resource for anyone interested in knowing about divine manifestations in the physical world and within oneself.

The unique illuminating words of His Highness Aga Khan III, tireless dynamic champion of Islam give universal hope and point towards a brighter future for all.

Get your special limited edition book now!

Book Price CAD $65 Please add shipping
​North America CAD $24
International CAD $60

https://epochscycle.wixsite.com/epochs
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AGA KHAN PLATINUM JUBILEE FILM - SOUND

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9g0wy7IzUM&amp=&list=PLS4N8YYLEMZY1ifSu4qT5tSNzaFtj_Ep1&amp=&index=3&utm_source=Direct
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/388518-a-tribute-to-sir-sultan-mahomed-shah-aga-khan-iii

November 2, 2018

A tribute to Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III

KARACHI: A leader who played a pivotal role in international affairs during the early 20th century, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan was a social reformer concerned about poverty alleviation and the uplift of women in the society.

To the Muslims of the Indo-Pakistan subcontinent he was a beacon of light, a source of inspiration and a provider of moral and material support. This great Muslim leader was born on November 02, 1877 at Karachi and dedicated his life worked for the development and advancement of the Muslims. He strongly advocated modern and multi-cultural education for both men and women in India and east Africa.

Through his intimate knowledge of eastern as well as the western cultures, he was uniquely placed to play a significant role in the international affairs of his time.

In 1902, at the age of 25, Lord Curzon appointed Sir Aga Khan as a youngest member of the Imperial Legislative Council in recognition of his services for the education of the Muslims.

His speeches at the Imperial Legislative Council clearly defined him as the political leader with a great promise, and he emerged as the leader of educational and political causes advocated by the Indian Muslims.

He soon realised that the main cause of the political backwardness of the Muslims was their neglect of education. From that point the educational development of Muslims became the most important mission of his life.

The Aga Khan III presided over the Muhammadan Educational Conference at Delhi. In his presidential address, he pointed out that the way to stop the decay of the political power of the Muslims of India was by laying the foundation of Muslim university at Aligarh. “We want to create for our people an intellectual capital a city that shall be a home of elevated ideals, a centre from which light and guidance shall be diffused among the Muslims of India and the wider world, and shall live up to the world as a standard of justice, virtue and purity of our beloved faith.”

Addressing the annual session of the Muslims Educational Conference in 1904 in Bombay, he said: “The far-sighted among the Muslims of India desire a university where the standard of learning should be the highest and where alongside scientific training there shall be moral education, that serves as the constant reminder of the eternal difference between right and wrong, which is the soul of education. I earnestly beg of you that the cause of University should not be forgotten in the shouts of the market place that daily rise among us.”

In 1911, the Aga Khan was nominated as the Chairman of the Funds Collection Committee and he took upon himself the task of collecting funds to establish the University. He announced a personal donation of Rs 100,000, and the committee headed by him visited many cities of India, collecting funds for the University. Wherever they went, they received spontaneous and tumultuous welcome from the Muslims. His efforts bore fruit, and he was able to collect Rs three million for the University and thus, the foundation stone for the future Aligarh University was laid. The Aga Khan III became the first Chancellor of the Aligarh University, which will remain a living monument to the Aga Khan’s educational activities in the interest of Islam. When the Aga Khan visited Aligarh in 1936, Dr. Ziauddin, the then vice-chancellor, in his welcome address said: “It must be a matter of real satisfaction to your Highness that most of the expansion and development of the University are in a large measure due to your Highness’ patronage and active support. The great founder of this institution, Sir Syed Ahmed Khan had expressed the hope that this institution would develop into a University, but the realization of the founder’s dream is precisely due to your Highness, who worked for it with the real zeal of a missionary.”

The Aga Khan III was a great advocate of female education and advancement. He stressed on the need to educate the girl child stating that “personally if I had two children, and one was a boy and other was a girl, and I could afford to educate only one, I would have no hesitation in giving the higher education to the girl.” He realized that the future of every generation was determined by the woman’s ability to lead the young along the right path and teach them the rudiments of culture.

On October 1, 1906 the Aga Khan led a distinguished delegation of 35 leading Muslims of India to Simla and presented a memorandum on behalf of the Muslims of the sub-continent. His address to the Viceroy stated that:“Muslims of India should not be regarded as a mere minority but a separate nation, whose rights and obligations should be guaranteed by the statute, and this was sought to be achieved through adequate and separate representation for Muslims both on the Local Bodies and in Legislative Councils”. (The Memoirs of Aga Khan).

The Simla Delegation was a success and, in the Morley-Minto Reforms of 1909, it was conceded that Muslims should henceforth be elected on the basis of separate electorates. The principle of separate electorates having been accepted, the demand for a separate homeland for Muslims as a separate nation was to become the inevitable in the course of time. As a result of the Simla Deputation, a movement towards establishing a Muslim political organization developed, and within three months the All-India Muslim League was formed and Sir Aga Khan was chosen as its first president for six years, i.e. from 1906 to 1913.

The Aga Khan III also had the privilege to be the representative for India at the Disarmament Conference in the League of Nations. Later on, he was unanimously elected as Chairman of the League of Nations, which is now the United Nations Organisation. After the World War I, the first Round Table Conference was organised by the British government in London attended by the great Quaid-e-Azam, Sir Aga Khan, Sir Mohammed Shafi, Maulana Mohammed Ali and Maulana Fazlul Huq.

In this conference, the delegation of Muslim leaders elected the Aga Khan as their leader and spokesman. During this meeting, Dr Allama Iqbal graciously spoke of the services of the Aga Khan for the Muslims and the Round Table Conference and said: “We have placed these demands before the conference under the guidance of His Highness the Aga Khan, that worthy of statesman whom we all admire and whom the Muslims of India love for the blood that runs through his veins”. (Letters and writings of Iqbal: B.A Dar, Iqbal Academy, Karachi 1967, p. 72)

The Aga Khan championed the cause of Muslims of the world throughout his life. Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan, a direct descendant of the Holy Prophet Mahomed, ( PBUH) was the 48th spiritual Imam of the Ismaili Muslims. The Ismailis celebrated Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah’s Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilees with enthusiasm during his 72 years of Imamat. With the proceeds of the three Jubilee celebrations, many social welfare and developmental institutions were developed in Asia and Africa. In India and Pakistan, these educational and health institutions were established for the humanitarian relief and uplift of the Muslim community.

The era also gave birth to the Diamond Jubilee schools in 1946. The Diamond Jubilee Schools for Girls, now commonly known as DJ schools, were established throughout the remote Northern Areas of what is now Pakistan. In addition, the scholarship programmes were established to give assistance to the needy students. All these initiatives are now being taken forward by his grandson, His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan IV under the aegis of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). The AKDN is a group of development agencies that look after the environment, health, education, architecture, culture, microfinance, rural development, disaster reduction, the promotion of private-sector enterprise and the revitalisation of the historic cities. The AKDN agencies are dedicated to improving the living conditions and opportunities for the poor, without regard to faith, origin or gender.

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III spent his last days at Villa Barkat in Geneva and breathed his last on July 11, 1957. He was laid to eternal rest at Aswan in Egypt. Today, on the occasion of his birth anniversary, we pay tribute to the memory of this great Muslim leader and hope to make Pakistan a stronger and prosperous country. In one of his messages, the Shah Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan identified “Pakistan as “the rising star of Islam” and wished the future of the country as bright.
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2019 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan III (Mohammed Shah) ('Men of the Day. No. 938. "The Aga Khan"')
12 of 15 portraits of Aga Khan III (Mohammed Shah)


https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw259694/Aga-Khan-III-Mohammed-Shah-Men-of-the-Day-No-938-The-Aga-Khan?LinkID=mp18477&role=sit&rNo=11

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Aga Khan III (Mohammed Shah)
14 of 15 portraits of Aga Khan III (Mohammed Shah)


https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw135419/Aga-Khan-III-Mohammed-Shah?LinkID=mp18477&role=sit&rNo=13
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2019 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Pioneer - Sir Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III Official Trailer

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=XgjE62rU4bA
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Mourns Aga Khan (1957)

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_w8BcT0fPU&utm_source=Direct

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AGA KHAN PLATINUM JUBILEE FILM - SOUND

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9g0wy7IzUM
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