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Health and Healing
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 17 Most Ignored Cancer Symptoms in Women and Men

Pay attention to these cancer symptoms you are most likely to ignore, and get yourself to a doctor if they persist, according to Caring.com.

Slide show:
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/the-17-most-ignored-cancer-symptoms-in-women-and-men/ss-BBIBxru?li=AAggNb9&ocid=mailsignout#image=1
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's time for a Food Revolution

The statistics are alarming.

If you’re over 50, the groundwork for dementia may already be in your brain.

The idea of losing everything you’ve ever cared about to this degenerative disease and being a burden on your family is almost too terrible to bear.

Half of seniors over 85 will die with some form of dementia.

But it doesn’t have to be your fate!

Research now shows that if you treat your brain right, you can actually prevent dementia or even reverse brain cell damage that may have already started.

Unfortunately, this isn’t information you’re going to hear on cable TV or likely not even from your doctor.

With your special report, you’ll find out what everyone needs to know about how food can help keep your brain healthy.

And in the Food Revolution Summit, you’ll get the most up-to-date research and wisdom about how the food you eat affects your health and the health of the planet.

Take Action Now

https://www.foodrevolutionsummit.org/brain-health/?orid=174434&opid=283

******
BRAIN FOOD

8 Superfoods Your Brain Will Love


https://cdn.foodrevolution.org/special-reports/special-report-brain-superfoods.pdf
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2018 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

11 Signs It's Skin Cancer

Slide show:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/11-signs-its-skin-cancer/ar-AAwLVTV?li=AAggNb9&ocid=mailsignout
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turmeric has a 6,000-year track record in Ayurvedic medicine.

Now, modern science is finding this herb to have a stunning array of beneficial properties.

Get the whole story here.

https://foodrevolution.org/blog/turmeric/?utm_campaign=frs18&utm_medium=email&utm_source=email-automated&utm_content=4353&utm_term=existing-email-list&email=kmaherali%40gmail.com&firstname=Karim&lastname=


Turmeric has been found to have properties that can be helpful in:
•Destroying multi-drug resistant cancer
•Protecting against radiation-induced damage and heavy metal toxicity
•Reducing inflammation
•Preventing Alzheimer’s related pathologies
•And more


Because it’s a natural substance, turmeric will likely never receive the FDA stamp of approval, due to its lack of patentability and therefore profitability


But that doesn’t mean you can’t learn from, and make use of, the tremendous body of research that has found this herb to be useful for preventing and treating hundreds of health conditions.


Learn all about the incredible benefits of turmeric here.

https://foodrevolution.org/blog/turmeric/?utm_campaign=frs18&utm_medium=email&utm_source=email-automated&utm_content=4353&utm_term=existing-email-list&email=kmaherali%40gmail.com&firstname=Karim&lastname=
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are We Being Misled About Precision Medicine?

Doctors and hospitals love to talk about the cancer patients they’ve saved, and reporters love to write about them. But deaths still vastly outnumber the rare successes.

Excerpt:

“There are very few instances in which we can look at a genomic test and pick a drug off the shelf and say, ‘That will work,’” said Dr. Nikhil Wagle, a cancer specialist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston who helped develop precision-medicine tests. “That’s our goal in the long run, but in 2018 we’re not there yet.”

Mr. Primiano said: “You think it’s going to be more precise, like a laser versus a shotgun. But it’s still a shotgun.”

There has been real progress, of course. Testing for genetic mutations has become standard in lung cancer, melanoma and a handful of other tumor types. But the number of people with advanced cancer eligible for these approaches is just 8 percent to 15 percent, experts estimate. And these targeted therapies help about half of patients who try them, said Dr. Vinay Prasad, an associate professor at Oregon Health and Science University.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/opinion/cancer-genetic-testing-precision-medicine.html?emc=edit_th_180912&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090912
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Enact food policies to curb chronic disease and health inequity

Unhealthy dietary patterns are a leading risk factor for death and disability in Canada. Best available evidence supports a diet rich in whole, unprocessed vegetables, fruits, whole grains and protein foods, with an emphasis on protein foods that are plant-based such as nuts, seeds and legumes, and moderate amounts of animal-based protein sources such as fish, poultry, meats and low-fat dairy products. Processed foods high in sodium, sugar and saturated and trans fats should be avoided. Canada’s new Food Guide should provide a foundation for healthy eating. However, it is difficult for many Canadians to eat healthy within the current food environment. There is a need to create food environments through public policies that support Canadians in maintaining healthy diets where they live, learn, work, and play. Such policies must include those that ensure:

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https://www.change.org/p/enact-food-policies-to-curb-chronic-disease-and-health-inequity-for-all-canadians
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kmaherali



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Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We Know How to Conquer Tuberculosis

Why aren’t outbreaks in poor countries treated the same way as those in rich ones?


Excerpt:

Antibiotics could eradicate tuberculosis, but only if they were given to people before they became contagious. In other words, doctors couldn’t just treat the people who were visibly sick. They would have to test all of the people that person came into contact with, and treat the ones who tested positive — even if they didn’t have symptoms yet. That way, the bacteria that caused the disease would be killed before it had a chance to spread.

In richer countries like the United States, Britain and Canada, that strategy has long since become a norm of public health. It’s helped eradicate TB from all but the poorest quarters — and, in some cases, even from there. And it’s kept some serious outbreaks from becoming epidemics. In poor countries, though, the approach has been deemed impractical. Tracking down all of a given patient’s contacts is difficult in the best of circumstances, the thinking goes, and resources are scarce enough that giving drugs to people who are not yet sick sounds extravagant.

More...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/26/opinion/we-know-how-to-conquer-tuberculosis.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ty_20180927&nl=opinion-today&nl_art=13&nlid=45305309emc%3Dedit_ty_20180927&ref=headline&te=1
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kmaherali



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Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over 100 experts from 20 different countries break the silence…

In each episode of A Global Quest, a brand new international panel of doctors, scientists, researchers and cancer survivors – reveal revolutionary cancer preventatives… therapies… and life-saving treatments that can protect you and your loved ones from cancer.

Sign up now for FREE to watch The Truth About Cancer®: A Global Quest – and join our mission to educate, expose and eradicate cancer once and for all!

https://go.thetruthaboutcancer.com/agq-encore/?a_aid=54f9e5cfe6290&a_bid=428c70e1&chan=trailer

We’ve all been told that cancer is a death sentence… but well over 100 of the leading alternative health experts want you to know the truth!

Cancer does not have to be a death sentence!

This is exciting news!

As our knowledge of cancer evolves, we have more cancer survivors and alternative health experts challenging what we used to believe as true. And this is a good thing.

My friends Ty and Charlene Bollinger are on a mission to change the way we think about cancer.

Ty endured the painful loss of both parents and way too many loved ones to cancer. But rather than take it lying down or giving up… Ty and Charlene set out on a life-changing mission to find real answers, to spread hope and to defeat cancer once and for all!

They traveled the world and gathered a “who’s who” of the very brightest minds and caring hearts in the field of alternative healing. Here’s just a taste of the amazing line-up:

Dr. Patrick Quillin - Beating Cancer with Nutrition
Dr. Joseph Mercola - Ketogenic Diet and Cancer
Dr. Robert Scott Bell - Gut Health, the Microbiome, and Cancer
Dr. Rashid Buttar -The Cancer Conflict: Resolving the 5th Toxicity
Dr. Tony Jimenez - Treating Cancer with Sound and Light
Chris Wark - How "Chris Beat Cancer"
Plus so many more
In The Truth About Cancer®: A Global Quest docu-series, these experts share their cutting-edge, and groundbreaking information about healing and preventing cancer and other chronic diseases…

And you can have a free front row seat. That’s right! You can watch The Truth About Cancer®: A Global Quest docu-series from the comfort of your own home… absolutely FREE to see. (The series starts on October 9, so be quick!)

Get your FREE ticket here.

In just a few short days, you’ll know all these experts therapies, treatments, and protocols that can save your life, or the life of a loved one.

Cancer will never be a death sentence again.

To Your Health!
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Whole Person, Integrative Approach to Prevention and Recovery - Cancer

SIGN UP FREE
Get early instant access to 5 life-changing lessons from Christiane Northrup, M.D., Iyanla Vanzant, and Ken Cook.

WATCH EXCLUSIVE VIDEO FROM KRIS CARR NOW

https://www.healingcancersummit.com/?utm_campaign=hhws&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_source=a_4026&utm_content=c_6838
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Mental Health Day: Recognising the importance of sound mind

Mental health is similar to physical health — everybody has it and should take care of it. When we reflect about our health in general, it is important to include the health of our minds as well as the health of our bodies in our thinking, plans, and conversations.

More...

https://the.ismaili/news/world-mental-health-day-recognising-importance-sound-mind
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kmaherali



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Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2018 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Results of Your Genetic Test Are Reassuring. But That Can Change.

Laboratories frequently “reclassify” genetic mutations. But there is no reliable system for telling patients or doctors that the results of their genetic tests are no longer valid.


The results of a genetic test may seem final — after all, a gene mutation is present or it is not. That mutation increases the risk of a disease, or it does not.

In fact, those findings are not as straightforward as they might seem, and the consequences may have grave implications for patients.

While a person’s genome doesn’t change, the research linking particular bits of DNA to disease is very much in flux. Geneticists and testing labs constantly receive new information that leads them to reassess genetic mutations.

As a result, a mutation seen as benign today may be found dangerous tomorrow. And vice versa. But there is no good way to get the new information to doctors and patients.

More...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/16/health/genetic-testing-mutations.html?emc=edit_th_181016&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053091016
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seeing Sounds

Researchers uncover molecular clues for synesthesia.


One in 25 people have synesthesia, perceiving the world in unusual ways. An experience with one sense automatically leads to perception in another sense: for example, seeing colors when listening to music. Now researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the University of Cambridge report clues into biological origins of such variations in human perception. They studied families with synesthesia, and describe genetic changes that might contribute to their differences in sensory experience.

Some people with synaesthesia may see sounds, while others may taste them or feel them as shapes. This kind of sensory cross-talk comes in many forms, and develops during early childhood. It has been known for over a century that synaesthesia runs in families, giving a strong hint that inherited factors are important.

More...

http://maxplanck.nautil.us/article/324/seeing-sounds?utm_source=Nautilus&utm_campaign=25098baa7a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_10_19_08_33&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_dc96ec7a9d-25098baa7a-60760513
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kmaherali



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Posts: 19497

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What’s Life Like After Depression? Surprisingly, Little Is Known

Most research on depression focuses on the afflicted, a new paper argues, overlooking a potentially informative group: people who have recovered.


A generation ago, depression was viewed as an unwanted guest: a gloomy presence that might appear in the wake of a loss or a grave disappointment and was slow to find the door. The people it haunted could acknowledge the poor company — I’ve been a little depressed since my father died — without worrying that they had become chronically ill.

Today, the condition has been recast in the medical literature as a darker, more permanent figure, a monster in the basement poised to overtake the psyche. For decades, researchers have debated the various types of depression, from mild to severe to “endogenous,” a rare, near-paralyzing despair. Hundreds of studies have been conducted, looking for markers that might predict the course of depression and identify the best paths to recovery. But treatment largely remains a process of trial and error. A drug that helps one person can make another worse. The same goes for talk therapies: some patients do very well, others don’t respond at all.

“If you got a depression diagnosis, one of the most basic things you want to know is, what are the chances of my life returning to normal or becoming optimal afterward?” said Jonathan Rottenberg, a professor of psychology at the University of South Florida. “You’d assume we’d have an answer to that question. I think it’s embarrassing that we don’t.”

In a paper in the current issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, Dr. Rottenberg and his colleagues argue that, in effect, the field has been looking for answers in the wrong place. In trying to understand how people with depression might escape their condition, scientists have focused almost entirely on the afflicted, overlooking a potentially informative group: people who once suffered from some form of depression but have more or less recovered.

More...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/22/health/depression-treatment-research.html?emc=edit_th_181023&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053091023
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Innovation can assist in the end of the AIDS epidemic by 2030, here’s how

A United Nations initiative backed by global experts has set its sights on an ambitious programme to bring an end to the AIDS epidemic by 2030.


A United Nations initiative backed by global experts has set its sights on an ambitious programme to bring an end to the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

The 90-90-90 strategy aims to do this by reaching three targets: 90% of all people with HIV must know their status, 90% of those diagnosed with HIV must receive antiretroviral therapy, and 90% of people receiving antiretroviral therapy must be virally suppressed. When a person is virally suppressed it means the virus in their blood is undetectable. The last goal is informed by evidence that people with a suppressed viral load are less likely to transmit HIV to others.

More...
https://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/special-report/2018/10/29/innovation-can-assist-in-the-end-of-the-aids-epidemic-by-2030-heres-how/

*****
Breast Cancer Awareness Month: The importance of early detection

Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer, and can affect up to one in eight women. Like some other forms of cancer, the condition is treatable, and over 90 per cent of cases are successfully treated when detected early. Men can also be diagnosed with breast cancer in rare instances, with approximately one out of every 100 cases affecting men.

Cancer in general accounts for a large proportion of the deaths caused by non-communicable diseases globally. These include cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Today, such conditions are responsible for over 70% of all deaths around the world.

In a speech at the initiation ceremony of the Aga Khan University Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, in December 2015, Mawlana Hazar Imam remarked on the healthcare challenges of the future.

“We are more and more confronted in modern society by non-communicable disease and therefore in the decades ahead we will be concentrating through the Aga Khan Health Network and other medical institutions in dealing with non-communicable diseases. And I refer to diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, mental and neurological illness, cancer and others. These are the areas where we must concentrate properly, to serve future generations of society.”

More...
https://the.ismaili/news/breast-cancer-awareness-month-importance-early-detection
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON FROM 83,000 BRAIN SCANS: DANIEL AMEN

Video:
https://tedsummaries.com/2014/04/17/the-most-important-lesson-from-83000-brain-scans-daniel-amen/

Excerpt:

The most important Daniel has learned is that you can literally change people’s brains and when you do, you change their lives. On a study on NFL players, players showing poor brain function were put on a Brain Smart program. After the program 80% of the players improved their memory, mood, and blood flow. It is possible to reverse brain damage. He mentions several other studies including Andrew, a 9 year old boy, who was extremely violent and would draw pictures of himself shooting other kids. He was a tragedy waiting to happen, but instead of blindly medicating him Daniel used brain scans to identify a golf ball sized cyst in his brain. After the cyst was removed, all of his behavioral problems went away. Daniel reveals that Andrew is his own nephew and ends his talk with a picture of Andrew at 18 years.
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

7 Silent Signs of a Heart Attack

Slide show:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/medical/7-silent-signs-of-a-heart-attack/ss-BBPvjCO?li=AAggNb9#image=1
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

World Diabetes Day: Don’t let diabetes remove the sweetness from your life

Diabetes is a lifelong condition, for which there is currently no cure, although scientists are undertaking pioneering research into care, treatment, and prevention. In recent years, the prevalence of diabetes has been rising more rapidly in the developing world.

In a speech at the initiation ceremony of the Aga Khan University Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, in December 2015, Mawlana Hazar Imam remarked on the healthcare challenges of the future.

“We are more and more confronted in modern society by non-communicable disease and therefore in the decades ahead we will be concentrating through the Aga Khan Health Network and other medical institutions in dealing with non-communicable diseases. And I refer to diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, mental and neurological illness, cancer and others. These are the areas where we must concentrate properly, to serve future generations of society.”

There are two main types of the condition; type 1 diabetes, where the body’s immune system attacks insulin producing cells; and type 2 diabetes, in which either the pancreas doesn’t secrete enough insulin or the insulin produced cannot be utilised. As a result of either type, this causes an unhealthy rise in blood sugar levels. If unchecked, diabetes can lead to potentially severe consequences such as blindness, stroke, heart attack, kidney failure, amputation, and even premature death.

Globally, over 422 million adults now live with diabetes, representing an almost four fold increase since 1980. South Asia in particular has seen a sharp rise in recent times. According to Diabetes Foundation India, approximately 50 million people in India suffer from diabetes and by 2025 this figure is likely to go up to 80 million making India the 'Diabetes Capital' of the world.

This brings up the question: What has caused such an alarming rise in the prevalence of diabetes? Numerous risk factors have contributed to individuals developing the condition. Unhealthy eating habits owing to a shift from balanced meals to processed and fast foods, and sweetened beverages. Increasingly sedentary lifestyles due to a lack of physical activity, and the overuse of electronic devices. Family history of diabetes and being overweight or obese are also significant risk factors.

Dr Sulaiman Ladhani, Chairman of the Aga Khan Health Board of India says, “AKHB has taken on the challenge of addressing the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), especially diabetes, in the Jamat by ensuring early detection through screenings and a comprehensive follow up programme where trained Community Case Workers (CCWs) are guiding individuals with diabetes to lead a healthy lifestyle. This initiative is the first of its kind and is being looked at as a model for other countries to replicate.”

“In addition, since habits are formed during the younger impressionable years, we are also focusing on creating healthy eating habits among children by organising programmes like Little Master Chef. Gestational diabetes during pregnancy is being addressed through the Safe Motherhood Programme where pregnant mothers are being sensitised about how it can be managed through regular checkups and lifestyle modification,” continued Dr Ladhani.

Speaking on the impact of the CCW programme, 34-year-old Nizar Bhura from Thane says, “In April this year I did an NCD check up at a screening camp organised by AKHB and the reports revealed that I had high cholesterol values and borderline values for blood sugar. As suggested by the CCW, I modified my lifestyle and made necessary dietary changes. The follow up tests showed that my blood parameters were within the normal range.”

Recognising the symptoms early on and undergoing a screening is half the battle won. Excessive thirst, frequent passing of water, increased hunger, loss of weight, and fatigue as well as delayed healing of wounds are some of the symptoms of diabetes. If you have experienced any of these, it would be wise to undergo a screening test so that corrective action can be taken.

https://the.ismaili/news/world-diabetes-day-dont-let-diabetes-remove-sweetness-your-life
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PROTEOMICS MIGHT HAVE SAVED MY MOTHER’S LIFE. AND IT MAY YET SAVE MINE.

THE 20,000 OR SO KNOWN PROTEINS IN EACH HUMAN BODY MIGHT SOON BE USED AS AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR DISEASE.


Excerpt:

Proteomics, or the study of proteins, has long offered the ability to identify many biological processes. But until recently, the sheer number of proteins and the complexity of their interactions made screenings impractical, if not impossible. Now, with the advent of more powerful computers and a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning, medical experts are imagining a future where proteomics will realize its power to tell us, to an incredible degree, what’s transpiring inside our bodies. As Omid Farokhzad, a professor and physician recently at Harvard Medical School, puts it: “We’ll be able to diagnose diseases such as cancers and Alzheimer’s years before symptoms.”

More....
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/11/15/magazine/tech-design-proteomics.html?emc=edit_th_181118&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053091118
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

9 Ways Multitasking is Killing Your Brain and Productivity, According to Neuroscientists.

We’d like to think that we can multitask—respond to emails, text messages, toggle between multiple tabs on a browser, and scroll through social media feeds, whilst working on important tasks—but, our brains would say otherwise.

According to neuroscientists, our brains aren’t built to do more than one thing at a time. And when we try to multitask, we damage our brains in ways that negatively affect our well-being, mental performance and productivity.

Here are 9 ways multitasking is killing your brain and productivity.

More...
https://mayooshin.com/multitasking-killing-your-brain-and-productivity/

******
Multitasking, or Marijuana?

Excerpt:

In his book The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload NYT bestselling author and neuroscientist Daniel Levitin argues that multitasking is even worse for us (cognitively… I don’t know about socially) than smoking pot:

“…[Marijuana’s] chief ingredient, cannabinol, activates dedicated cannabinol receptors in the brain and interferes profoundly with memory and with our ability to concentrate on several things at once. [Some guy named] Wilson showed that the cognitive losses from multitasking are even greater than the cognitive losses from pot smoking.”

More...
https://thepolymathproject.com/multitasking-or-marijuana/
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Richmond Family Health Fair: Expanding our knowledge of non-communicable diseases, mental health, and self-care

Our quality of life depends on the decisions we make for our health. These decisions are based on the knowledge we possess about preventive measures for non-communicable diseases and cancer, awareness of mental health conditions, and the importance of nutrition and exercise. Without this knowledge, it is difficult for us to make well-informed decisions about our health.

The Aga Khan Health Board for the Northeastern US has made great efforts to provide patient education throughout the region, with specialized sessions led by experts from our Jamat to discuss important issues, including cancer awareness and diabetes management.

The first annual Family Health Fair was held at Richmond Jamatkhana on October 28, 2018. Healthcare providers from across the region gathered together for a day dedicated to providing patient education and counseling to the growing Jamat in Richmond, Virginia. Over 300 Jamati members of all age groups, with a large portion being new immigrants from the Central Asian Jamat attended the event.

Upon entry, families were provided with a directory of free or low-cost health services in the region, as well as a bag with personal care items for men, women, and children. In the main hall, there were informational booths attended by our health care providers to educate members about non-communicable diseases, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, mental health, physical hygiene, family planning, immunizations, child developmental milestones, nutrition, dental care and oral health, and guidance about health insurance, as well as state and federal benefits that are available.

Representatives from external organizations, including Planned Parenthood, Aetna and the Social Security Administration, were available to provide further information and resources to the Jamat. In this setting, participants were free to discuss their concerns and have their questions answered. They were able to build connections between the nutrition recommendations they received and their effects on oral health, child development, and the development of chronic disease, to their impact on mental health and quality of life. Jamati members were educated on the importance of regular follow-ups with a physician and the benefits of leading a healthy lifestyle.

A Jamati member commented on the impact of the Family Health Fair, saying: “I have been struggling with my weight for a very long time and I have been following a very strict diet and extreme workouts—but no luck. When I saw the heart surgeon at the health fair, he suggested a couple of things and I am following them 100%. And I am so thankful and grateful to report that I have lost weight…Thank you so much for giving our Jamat opportunities to be healthier!”

Throughout the day, there were also talks led by experts from our region to discuss specific issues including Cancer Awareness, by Dr. Anees Chagpar from Yale University, and Family Planning by Certified Nurse Midwife, Salma Mody, from Planned Parenthood. Nutrition recommendations were also provided by Nasreen Rehmani, a local dietician. Jamati members also participated in physical activity sessions including Zumba classes, Yoga for kids, and Yoga & Mindfulness. These sessions were designed to teach the Jamat about the importance of recommended cancer screening guidelines, the impact of family planning on socio-economic status, and the importance of diet and exercise on your overall health and well-being.

Uninsured members of the Jamat also had the opportunity to meet with physicians from different specialties including, Dr. Iraj Mirshahi (Internal Medicine), Dr. Nadim Geloo (Cardiology), Dr. Malik Meghjani (Geriatrics) and Dr. Farah Alani (Podiatry), to better understand their medical conditions and how to manage them. Over 150 individuals were assessed by a physician, including over 80 individuals who underwent vision screenings by optometrists and ophthalmologists, with support from the Powhatan Lions Club.

Overall, the event was well-received by the Richmond Jamat. Our providers, some of whom traveled for as much as 8 hours from Connecticut to provide their services at this event, truly enjoyed the day and look forward to returning next year. The Jamat has shown a great enthusiasm and thirst for expanding its knowledge about leading a healthy life, with requests for more specialized programming from the Health Board.

https://the.ismaili/richmond-family-health-fair-expanding-our-knowledge-non-communicable-diseases-mental-health-and-self
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dr. Google Is a Liar

Fake news threatens our democracy. Fake medical news threatens our lives.


It started during yoga class. She felt a strange pull on her neck, a sensation completely foreign to her. Her friend suggested she rush to the emergency room. It turned out that she was having a heart attack.

She didn’t fit the stereotype of someone likely to have a heart attack. She exercised, did not smoke, watched her plate. But on reviewing her medical history, I found that her cholesterol level was sky high. She had been prescribed a cholesterol-lowering statin medication, but she never picked up the prescription because of the scary things she had read about statins on the internet. She was the victim of a malady fast gearing up to be a modern pandemic — fake medical news.

While misinformation has been the object of great attention in politics, medical misinformation might have an even greater body count. As is true with fake news in general, medical lies tend to spread further than truths on the internet — and they have very real repercussions.

Numerous studies have shown that the benefits of statins far outweigh the risks, especially for people at high risk of heart disease. But they have been targeted online by a disparate group that includes paranoid zealots, people selling alternative therapies and those who just want clicks. Innumerable web pages and social media posts exaggerate rare risks and drum up unfounded claims, from asserting that statins cause cancer to suggesting that low cholesterol is actually bad for health. Even stories simply weighing the risks versus benefits of statins, a 2016 study found, were associated with patients’ stopping the cholesterol-lowering drugs — which is associated with a spike in heart attacks.

More...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/16/opinion/statin-side-effects-cancer.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ty_20181217&nl=opinion-today&nl_art=3&nlid=45305309emc%3Dedit_ty_20181217&ref=headline&te=1
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 8:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even laypersons can save lives if trained in CPR.

Excerpt:

Studies have shown that when laypersons were trained to provide CPR, it increased the chances of survival of a cardiac arrest patient by two to three times.

In our study, we observed that most of the patients suffered cardiac arrest at home (77 out of 100). In such scenarios, it would be difficult to find a trained healthcare professional in time and would be easier to save someone’s life if a CPR-trained individual were present at the scene.

Considering the imp­­ortance of conducting CPR trainings for local community members, one of our research groups is teaching hands-only CPR (excluding mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) to non-medical professionals in different settings such as sch­ools, hospitals etc, and several other interest groups are also working towards this.

Since the burden of sudden cardiac arrests is higher and survival rate is poor in our country, there is a dire need of such training programmes. Combining efforts in a systematic way in order to target a wider population is something that we need at this point.

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https://www.dawn.com/news/1453263
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recognising World Disability Day in Kenya

Within the Jamat, there is a significant number of people that live with some form of disability, including physical impairment, sensory impairment, cognitive impairment, intellectual impairment, and mental illness. Like everyone, this group of individuals have their own uniqueness, which needs to be understood and embraced. It can be done in an environment that promotes equality, inclusiveness, and mutual respect, free from prejudice.

“Diversity is not a reason to put up walls, but rather to open windows. It is not a burden, it is a blessing.”

Mawlana Hazar Imam, Adrienne Clarkson Prize for Global Citizenship, 21 September 2016, Global Centre for Pluralism, Toronto, Canada.

In commemoration of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, annually observed on 3 December, the Jamati Special Needs Committee in Kenya organised a unique panel of local experts to engage with the Jamat about various forms of special needs, particularly focusing on mental health, development disorders, learning and visual difficulties, as well as community counselling services available. The speakers provided information on identification of special needs, what support is available, and examples of successful individuals living with disabilities.

This knowledgeable and experienced panel, representing diverse backgrounds and perspectives, included Ms. Tasreen Keshavjee, a psychotherapist; Ms. Tasneem Tayeb, a professional counsellor; Dr. Alliyah Mohamed, a consultant pediatrician with a subspecialty in developmental pediatrics; Ms. Zahra Rashid, an optometrist specialising in pediatrics and low vision; and Ms. Donica Merhazion a learning support teacher.

The session commenced with a delightful poem titled, “I’m Glad To Be Me” presented by a group of Ismaili youth. This was followed by captivating presentations by each expert and a Q&A session. This interactive session provided a great opportunity to learn together and from one another. It re-emphasised that those with mental or physical challenges can prosper in an enabling environment fostered by compassion, understanding, acceptance, and support.

It was an enlightening experience for those that attended and the first of many events that the committee will be organizing to create awareness and enhance the acceptance and engagement of people with disabilities within and beyond the Jamat.

Some of the comments received from participants at the event included:

“A very meaningful event. Also happy to observe young professionals deliver so well. The choice of cross-subjects was very well done as it gave a complementary awareness.”

“It was very informative and your speakers were excellent. Wonderful session- I learnt so many new things.”

For more information contact the committee on spn@akji-kenya.org (link sends e-mail).

Photos at:

https://the.ismaili/kenya/recognising-world-disability-day-kenya?utm_source=Direct
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

25 diseases that remain incurable

Thanks to scientific advances in recent decades, numerous diseases that were once fatal are now curable. Unfortunately, much work remains to be done to find remedies for many other illnesses, including the 25 described below.

In many cases, science has been able to develop various treatments to improve the quality of life and prolong life expectancy for those afflicted with incurable illnesses. However, as of today, no reliable, effective treatments for eliminating them yet exist.

Slide show:

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/health/wellness/25-diseases-that-remain-incurable/ss-BBTlTSg?li=AAggNb9&ocid=mailsignout#image=1
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Case Against Cough Medicine

Evidence is sorely lacking for the value of any over-the-counter remedy to treat most coughs.


Excerpt:

Coughs are one of the leading reasons for visits to the doctor and trips to the drugstore, where shelf-long displays of nonprescription cough medicines can overwhelm even the most discerning consumer. And Americans spend some $8 billion a year on over-the-counter cough and cold products.

Yet evidence is sorely lacking for the value of any over-the-counter remedy to treat most coughs, be they wet or dry. More likely, any significant benefit people get from cough medicine is probably due primarily to the placebo effect: You think — you hope — it will help, so it does, at least temporarily. But even when cough medicines help a little, they do not cure or shorten the duration of a cough.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/18/well/live/the-case-against-cough-medicine.html?em_pos=medium&emc=edit_sc_20190219&nl=science-times&nl_art=3&nlid=45305309emc%3Dedit_sc_20190219&ref=headline&te=1
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2019 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you ‘connected’? The Internet and its potential impact on health

It is estimated that at the end of 2018, 51.2 per cent of the global population, or 3.9 billion people, were using the Internet. While the Internet has brought about many positive changes, there have also been some undesirable effects of its growth and increased usage.

The advent and exponential growth of the Internet has brought about much change in the world including digital tools and services aimed at boosting productivity or convenience, instant access to information, and the proliferation of social networks. This has resulted in the creation of industries, paradigm shifts, and new ways for companies to promote themselves and reach potential consumers globally. The last seven years have also seen Internet usage double in developing countries, showing that all are eager to benefit from the opportunities it brings.

In a speech made by Mawlana Hazar Imam at the opening of a new printing press at the Nation Media Group in Nairobi, Kenya, in March 2016, he remarked, “In such a world, it is absolutely critical – more than ever – that the public should have somewhere to turn for reliable, balanced, objective and accurate information, as best as it can be discovered. No one, including the Nation Media Group, will ever be able to do that perfectly. But it is critically important that all of us should try.”

Trust is a critical theme as we consider the rapid global expansion of Internet usage and access to ‘information’ that is available at the touch of a button or in the palm of our hand. In the so-called Post-Truth era, can we always believe what we find? As far as possible, it is important that we should strive to rely on sources of information that are trustworthy and verifiable.

In relation to the Ismaili community specifically, The.Ismaili was set up as the official site for the global Jamat before the Golden Jubilee and the Jamat has come to rely on this as a trustworthy source of information. Similarly, various Imamat institutions have established official websites - AKDN.org, IIS.ac.uk and the website for the Ismaili Imamat – Ismaili.Imamat – to provide credible information to the Jamat and others. Over the last few years, a host of Jamati social media pages – many carrying the same The.Ismaili brand - have grown, in response to the need to provide members of the Jamat of all ages with timely, relevant, vibrant and authorised content related to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family, Imamat institutions, and Jamats worldwide.

In this age of constant connectivity, there is both an expectation and perhaps a desire to always be contactable, in a plethora of ways.

From a work perspective, this could mean that the ‘9-5’ work day no longer exists. Emails are sent and responded to at all hours, on weekends, or even while on vacation, often without compensation. Depending on the organisational culture, there can be an expectation to respond, and those who do not may be seen in a different light. This can impact personal, family, and social time, and may also result in people being distracted or not being ‘present’ with those they care for the most.

To prevent this culture from impacting health, you can consider setting boundaries with colleagues such as not checking emails or messages in the evening. Similarly, it is important to have boundaries within your families and social groups where, for example, you can suggest placing phones out of sight during family or friend time.

More...

https://the.ismaili/our-stories/are-you-%E2%80%98connected%E2%80%99-internet-and-its-potential-impact-health
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tens of Thousands of Heart Patients May Not Need Open-Heart Surgery

Replacement of the aortic valve with a minimally invasive procedure called TAVR proved effective in younger, healthier patients.


The operation is a daring one: To replace a failing heart valve, cardiologists insert a replacement through a patient’s groin and thread it all the way to the heart, maneuvering it into the site of the old valve.

The procedure, called transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), has been reserved mostly for patients so old and sick they might not survive open-heart surgery. Now, two large clinical trials show that TAVR is just as useful in younger, healthier patients.

It might even be better, offering lower risks of disabling strokes and death, compared to open-heart surgery. Cardiologists say it will likely change the standard of care for most patients with failing aortic valves.

“Is it important? Heck, yes,” said Dr. Robert Lederman, who directs the interventional cardiology research program at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The findings “were remarkable,” he added.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/16/health/aortic-valve-replacement-heart.html?emc=edit_th_190317&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090317
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reports of Breast Implant Illnesses Prompt Federal Review

The Food and Drug Administration is taking another look at breast implants because of renewed safety concerns.


Reports from thousands of women that breast implants are causing problems like debilitating joint pain and fatigue, claims long dismissed by the medical profession, are receiving new attention from the Food and Drug Administration and researchers.

This may be a long-awaited moment of validation for tens of thousands of women who have been brushed off as neurotic, looking to cash in on lawsuits or just victims of chance who coincidentally became ill while having implants.

The F.D.A. has begun to re-examine questions about implant safety that have long been disputed by doctors and implant manufacturers, and that most consumers thought had been resolved a decade or so ago.

Millions of women have implants, which are silicone sacs filled with either salt water or silicone gel, used to enlarge the breasts cosmetically or to rebuild them after a mastectomy for breast cancer.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/19/health/breast-implants-fda-illness.html?emc=edit_th_190320&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090320
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seeing Really Is Believing

How cataract surgery changed my life.


Excerpt:

One night, I took the lampshade off the light by my bed. My wife looked at me curiously. “It’s just so dark in here,” I told her. “Isn’t it?”

She wasn’t sure what to tell me. She never had any problem with shadows.

Then, during a routine checkup with my optometrist, my doctor asked me if my cataracts were bothering me.

Cataracts? I said. The what’s all this now?

Indeed, I had an early onset case of cataracts, a buildup of protein in my eyes that was keeping the light from getting in. I remember a sense of shock when I was diagnosed. I’m not crazy! I thought. The world really was getting darker.

Fortunately, cataracts can be treated, and not only that, but the surgery often means implanting new lenses which correct your vision. People who’d had it told me that it had changed their lives.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/20/opinion/seeing-really-is-believing.html?emc=edit_th_190321&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090321
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At 71, She’s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why.

Jo Cameron, 71, has a rare genetic mutation that keeps her from feeling pain or anxiety, according to a new scientific report. Researchers hope the finding can help develop more effective treatments for pain.

She’d been told that childbirth was going to be painful. But as the hours wore on, nothing bothered her — even without an epidural.

“I could feel that my body was changing, but it didn’t hurt me,” recalled the woman, Jo Cameron, who is now 71. She likened it to “a tickle.” Later, she would tell prospective mothers, “Don’t worry, it’s not as bad as people say it is.”

It was only recently — more than four decades later — that she learned her friends were not exaggerating.

Rather, there was something different about the way her body experienced pain: For the most part, it didn’t.

Scientists believe they now understand why. In a paper published Thursday in The British Journal of Anaesthesia, researchers attributed Ms. Cameron’s virtually pain-free life to a mutation in a previously unidentified gene. The hope, they say, is that the finding could eventually contribute to the development of a novel pain treatment. They believe this mutation may also be connected to why Ms. Cameron has felt little anxiety or fear throughout her life and why her body heals quickly.

“We’ve never come across a patient like this,” said John Wood, the head of the Molecular Nociception Group at University College London.

More...
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/28/health/woman-pain-anxiety.html?emc=edit_th_190329&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090329
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