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Institutional Activities in Tajikistan
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 2:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MPs visit AKDN projects in Gorno Badakhshan ahead of president’s visit to the region

DUSHANBE, June 21, 2016, Asia-Plus -- An eight member delegation of Tajikistan’s lower chamber (Majlisi Namoyandagon) of parliament, led by deputy Chairperson, Mrs Khairinisso Yusufi, visited Khorog, the capital of the Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO) on June 18, 2016, according to the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) Office in Tajikistan.

This visit was planned ahead of the President’s visit to GBAO to celebrate National Unity Day from June 25-28, aimed at familiarizing high level government officials on the progress of University of Central Asia’s Khorog campus.

Accompanied by AKDN Diplomatic Representative for Tajikistan Akbar Ali Pesnani, the delegation also visited UCA’s School of Professional and Continuing Education (UCA SPCE), Aga Khan Lyceum, as well as Khorog Diagnostic Unit. Mr. Pesnani welcomed the guests to Khorog campus.

“It is an honor for AKDN that Parliamentarians are visiting UCA - currently one of our most important investments in Tajikistan. The University has come a long way and is now ready to begin its academic programs in 2016. This has been possible due to continuous support of the Tajik government,” said Mr. Pesnani.

“The Tajik government considers AKDN as a valuable and reliable partner. We have received a very positive and memorable impression of UCA, which I believe will become a platform for discussion, analysis, research and exchange of best practices in future,” said Mrs. Yusufi.

Dr. Bohdan Krawchenko, UCA Director General, and Muzaffar Jorubov, UCA Chief Operating Officer, accompanied the delegation briefing them on the admissions process, faculty recruitment and courses offered by UCA.

“UCA was established to offer an internationally recognized standard of higher education in Central Asia and we are pleased this delegation has taken personal interest to review progress and dialogue with us on future cooperation strategies,” said Krawchenko.

This parliamentary visit is an outcome of Pesnani’s meeting with Shukurjon Zuhurov, Chairman of Majlisi Namoyandagon on May 17, 2016. At this meeting Zuhurov expressed gratitude to AKDN for contributing to education, social, health and cultural sectors of Tajikistan. UCA has developed constructive relationships with the Tajik Parliament and regularly conducts English courses for its members.

http://news.tj/en/news/mps-visit-akdn-projects-gorno-badakhshan-ahead-president-s-visit-region
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 6:58 pm    Post subject: Tajik president inaugurates AKF-supported projects - Bartang Reply with quote

http://www.timesca.com/index.php/news/16811-tajik-president-inaugurates-akf-supported-projects-in-bartang-valley


Saturday, 25 June 2016 13:29
Written by TCA

DUSHANBE (TCA) — Tajikistan President Emomali Rakhmon on June 25 inaugurated a drinking water supply project that is expected to benefit 58 households, housing 354 people in disaster affected area of Ghudara village of Bartang valley, Rushan district, in Tajikistan’s Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO). The project that aims at improving access to safe drinking water and sanitation was implemented by Aga Khan Foundation and supported by the government of Finland, the Aga Khan Development Network said.

Bartang valley was struck by a 7.2 magnitude earthquake on December 7, 2015 that destroyed 223 buildings, including houses, schools and medical points, as well as partially destroyed more than 300 buildings, and caused many people to be temporarily evacuated.

Villages of Bartang valley are extremely remote and the distance from them to Rushan District Centre is approximately 180 km, and 250 km to Khorog, the regional capital of GBAO. The impoverished population of the remote village used to walk long distance to collect water.

“It is an honor for Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) that Tajik President, initiator of UN Water for Life Decade, inaugurates our water supply project. We believe that access to clean water and adequate sanitation will lead to improved health conditions and reduced water-borne deceases in the village,” said Akbar Ali Pesnani, AKDN Diplomatic Representative.

The President also inaugurated Pasor’s mini-hydroelectric power station (HPS) in Bartang valley of Rushan district. The 104,000 USD project is expected to deliver renewable energy to 124 households, housing 722 people in three remote villages of Pasor, Bopasor and Ghudara in Bartang valley. This project was implemented by Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) of Aga Khan Development Network.

“Apart from construction of hydroelectric power station and provision of the impoverished and isolated population of Bartang valley with water supply system, the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) in the aftermath of the earthquake also supported construction of houses for the affected community, as well as contributed to capacity in disaster risk reduction and resilience building,” said Yodgor Faizov, Chief Executive Officer, Aga Khan Foundation.
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2016 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tajikistan and Aga Khan Foundation open tourism, sports and culture facilities

http://www.timesca.com/index.php/news/16815-tajikistan-and-aga-khan-foundation-open-tourism-sports-and-culture-facilities

KHOROG, Tajikistan (TCA) — On June 26, the President of Tajikistan Emomali Rakhmon inaugurated the Pamir Mountain Welcome Centre (PMWC) and Youth, Sports and Culture complex in Khorog in Tajikistan’s Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast.

The PMWC will be a hub for leisure and tourism related businesses. Managed by the Pamir Eco-Cultural Tourism Association (PECTA) it will provide office space, meeting space, a souvenir shop, information centre, lost-and-found service, equipment rent service for mountaineering and touring equipment, laundry cafe and other needed services. The PMWC will provide services to over 5000 tourists a year and conduct trainings for over 80 employees of its member tour operators annually.

“We believe that Pamir known for its natural God given beauty and now supported by friendly services provided at Pamir Mountains Welcome Centre will make the visitors feel more comfortable and they will remember their visit to Pamirs and Tajikistan for a long time and also promote the country to other potential tourists of the region,” said Akbar Ali Pesnani, Diplomatic Representative, Aga Khan Development Network.

The multi-purpose Youth, Sports and Culture complex constructed near the Tem cross-border market will serve as an additional facility to foster the cross-border cooperation and cultural dialogue between the Tajik and Afghan communities living on both side of the Panj river and contribute to stability in the border areas. Besides day-to-day sports activities, the centre is constructed and equipped with movable equipment to transform it easily to serve as well for culture events, conferences, fairs, and large meetings.

The Pamir Mountain Welcome Centre and Youth, Sports and Culture complex were built under the "Peace building and livelihood opportunities in conflict affected Afghan/Tajik border communities" project financed by the British Embassy in Dushanbe. The project aims at improving stability along the Tajik-Afghan border by maximising economic opportunities and cultural exchange. The project was implemented by the Aga Khan Foundation Tajikistan together with the Mountain Societies Development Support Programme (MSDSP). The total project budget was GBP 500,000.

*****
Inauguration of a modern sports hall and acquaintance with the work of a crossborder market in Tem area of Khorog city

http://www.president.tj/en/node/12312

On June 26, in the second day of his working visit to the cities and districts of GBAO, the Founder of Peace and National Unity - the Leader of the Nation, the President of the Republic of Tajikistan Emomali Rahmon has inaugurated a modern sports hall, which has been constructed in the community Tem of Khorog city.

A modern sports hall consists of a large hall with 60 seats and support facilities. It was noted that there is a possibility for holding sporting events, including volleyball, basketball, wrestling, table tennis, as well as assemblies, seminars, meetings and cultural events.

The project cost of construction is 2 million 55 thousand somoni. The construction works have been performed by "Sharif" LLC. In the course of construction of the facility 38 people were provided with jobs and good wages.

The building of a sports hall is a part of a cross-border market of Tem village established on the border with the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

****
Photos:

https://www.flickr.com//photos/khadamotimatbuot/sets/72157669657824422/show/
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2016 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.eurocomms.com/industry-news/11786-telia-sells-up-to-aga-khan-in-tajikistan#


Telia sells up to Aga Khan in Tajikistan

Latest News
07 September 2016

Telia has continued its divestment programme in Eurasia by selling its stake in Indigo Tajikistan (Tcell).

The Scandinavian operator has sold its 60 percent holding in Central Asian Telecommunications Development, which controls Tcell, to the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED).

Telia is getting $39 million for its stake, with Tcell valued at $66 million, and said it expects the deal to close before the end of the year.

AKFED, which is part of the Aga Khan Development Network and invests in a range of businesses in Africa, South Asia and Central Asia, owns the remaining 40 percent of Tcell.

It was founded by the Aga Khan, the spiritual leader of Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims.

Telia announced 12 months ago that it was exiting its businesses in Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Nepal, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan to focus on Europe.

It sold its Nepalese opco to Axiata last December.

The operator saw sales fall by two percent in the three months to June, its most recent financial results.

Telia President and CEO Johan Dennelind said: “The divestments of our holding in Tcell is in line with our ambition to reduce our presence in Eurasia and increase focus on our operations in the Nordics and Baltics.

“AKFED has been a significant shareholder in Tcell since inception, and I am convinced that they will be able to further develop the company.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2016 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan fund buys Tcell from Telia

07 September 2016

Telia Company sells 60% stake in Tajikistan operator Tcell for $39m to 40% owner Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development

The Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (Akfed) has added another telecoms operator to its portfolio by buying Telia Company’s 60% stake in Tajikistan operator Tcell. Akfed already owned the other 40% and is paying just $39 million for the rest.

Akfed owns Afghanistan’s Roshan mobile operator, which in turn also owns Smart Telecom, with businesses in east Africa.

Telia – formerly TeliaSonera – has been looking to sell off its interests outside its core European market. Earlier this year it sold its 60% stake in Nepal’s Ncell to Axiata. In January CEO Johan Dennelind announced that the whole Eurasian region would be regarded as "discontinued operations" in its accounts.

Dennelind said of the latest sale: "The divestments of our holding in Tcell is in line with our ambition to reduce our presence in Eurasia and increase focus on our operations in the Nordics and Baltics. Akfed has been a significant shareholder in Tcell since inception, and I am convinced that they will be able to further develop the company."

The sale price was based on an enterprise value of $66 million.

Akfed is part of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). The fund says that it "works in partnership with international organisations and governments to stimulate the private sectors of developing economies, with the aim of generating capital for investment in sustainable development initiatives".

The Aga Khan, the founder and chairman of AKDN, is the 49th hereditary imam – or spiritual leader – of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims.

http://www.globaltelecomsbusiness.com/Article/3583679/Regions/25189/Aga-Khan-fund-buys-Tcell-from-Telia.html
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2016 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Travel Section: Tajikistan - Country of Many Wonders

Extract:

Resilient. Inspirational. Proud. That is how I would describe the people of Tajikistan. The people I met embody these characteristics and why I encouraged my friends and family to visit before it becomes a tourist destination. Though the road for development and economic growth is a long one for the country, the bold steps taken by the people of Tajikistan - with assistance from agencies such as the Aga Khan Foundation — are impressive. My wish is now that other powerful countries do not interfere with Tajikistan’s progress and that instead they support the people who have been through so much already. There were several stories I came back with but for me I learned and witnessed the resilience of the people in spite of all the challenges they faced and continue to face. In North America the challenges we face pale in comparison to those living in Tajikistan yet their determination and ability to see beyond these limitation are inspiring and something we all could learn from.

http://www.quartersectioncollective.com/home/2016/12/4/travel-guide-tajikistan-country-of-many-wonders
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pamir Energy decides not to introduce power rationing in Gorno Badakhshan

Pamir Energy Company (Pamir Energy), which supplies electricity to the majority of districts of the Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO), has decided not to introduce power rationing in the region as an extreme cold weather has receded.

“Besides, the current volumes of water in the Ghund River are enough for generation of electricity to meet the basic requirements of customers in electricity,” Amrikhon Rahimov, the head of the Pamir Energy generation department, told Asia-Plus on Friday.

According to him, all the 26 sections are now being provided with electricity and only in the evening and in the night the power supply is cut off for 2 or 2½ hours.

Recall, Pamir Energy was going to introduce power rationing in the area due to extreme cold weather that has hit the region in early January.

Pamir Energy Director General, Daler Jumayev, told reporters in Khorog on January 16 that volumes of water in the Ghund River that powers the Pamir-1 hydroelectric power plant (HPP) and the Khorog HPP have nearly halved because of extreme cold weather.

“Therefore, the power plants now cannot operate in full capacity and we were forced to reduce the supply of daily electricity in five of 26 sections by four hours,” Jumayev noted.

If extreme cold weather continues and volumes of water in the Ghund River continue declining, the company will be forced to introduce power rationing in all sections, the director general said.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and a five-year civil war, Tajikistan’s electrical infrastructure required major investment. Among the most affected areas was the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO), where people and economic development suffered during the cold winter months.

The Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED), in partnership with the International Finance Corporation, formed the Pamir Energy Company in 2002 to address the situation.

Pamir Energy is a joint project of the Government of Tajikistan, AKFED, the World Bank’s private finance division, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). A total cost of the project is some 26.5 million U.S. dollars, including the Tajik government’s contribution of 10 million U.S. dollars.

The company has a 25 year concession on the assets formerly under the management on Barqi Tojik (Tajik electricity supplier) in the Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO). In exchange for this concession (management right), Pamir Energy has invested in completing the Pamir hydropower station, rehabilitating power generation, transmission and distribution assets, and improving the management of the company.

The Pamir Private Power Project has helped to enhance development and improve welfare in GBAO by providing reliable, affordable, and clean electricity.

https://www.asiaplus.tj/en/node/235776


[/b]
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 26, 2017 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBC Earth Report - Where the families and mountains meet

March 2017 - In a 45 minute documentary, narrated by David Attenborough, Earth report (which ran for many years on the BBC), explores Gorno-Badakhshan, Tajikistan, and the dramatic changes that followed in the area after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent civil war. the economic crash was particularly severe in a province that had largely been dependant on Soviet largesse shipped in from elsewhere. Food security was 15 percent. All diesel fuel was heavily subsidized. When food and fuel subsidies ended, the people of Gorno-Badakhshan suffered greatly. But with the help of the agencies of the Aga Khan Development Network, food security rose to over 70 percent in 10 years, a Soviet-era hydroelectric plant was refurbished and expanded. Other social programmes in health and education followed, including the founding of the University of Central Asia campus in Khorog, the capital of the Gorno-Badakhshan.

VIDEO

http://www.akdn.org/ru/video/bbc-earth-report-where-families-and-mountains-meet
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Better Living at the Flip of a Switch

Power lines in Tajikistan were extended across the border into Afghanistan last year, transmitting reliable electricity and raising the quality of life for thousands of Afghans.

One morning last May, 100 residents of two isolated communities in Afghanistan gathered with a handful of representatives of the governments of the United States, Tajikistan and Afghanistan, and the Aga Khan Development Network. Together they celebrated the end of a journey connecting their villages to the power grid. For the citizens of Deshor and Wiriz, it marked the start of a new era.

For the first time, the new transmission lines crossing the border from Tajikistan brought reliable electricity, with associated social and economic opportunities to these communities high in the Afghan Pamir Mountains. It changed life for over 400 Afghan households—nearly 3,000 people—and, through infrastructure upgrades, improved the availability of reliable electricity for another 20,000 people.

Pamir Energy—a partnership of the Government of Tajikistan, the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development and the International Finance Corporation—worked with USAID and the Aga Khan Foundation USA to extend transmission lines across the Panj River, which serves as much of the Afghan-Tajik border, into Afghanistan’s Shugnan district. Through the partnership, Pamir Energy upgraded facilities and trained Afghan utility workers to maintain the new lines and improve the region’s infrastructure.

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https://www.usaid.gov/news-information/frontlines/march-april-2017/better-living-flip-switch
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.reuters.com/article/telia-earnings-idUSL8N1HY10S

FRB | Wed Apr 26, 2017 | 4:44am EDT

UPDATE 1-Telia sells Tajik operations to Aga Khan's development fund


STOCKHOLM, April 26 Nordic telecom operator Telia Company has agreed to sell its Tajik operations to the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development, taking a step closer to withdrawing from its troubled Central Asian business.

Telia said it had sold its 60 percent stake in Tajik operator Tcell to the development fund founded by the Aga Khan, a businessman and spiritual leader of the Ismaili Muslims, also known for owning the largest horse-racing operation in France.

An earlier deal to sell that stake to the fund fell through as the authorities in Tajikistan did not give their approval in time.

Telia said in 2015 it would gradually abandon its Central Asian markets, hit by years of investigations into alleged corruption linked to local partners and problems accessing cash in distant countries.

The firm still expects to leave the five remaining countries - Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Georgia, Moldova and Uzbekistan - this year, CEO Johan Dennelind told Reuters.

Telia's Tajik operations are reported as discontinued operations and the book value of Telia's interests has been adjusted to zero. The price agreed in the original deal with the Aga Khan Fund in September last year was around $13 million in equity value.

Telia also scaled back its cost estimate for a looming settlement payment related to its entry into Uzbekistan in 2007 to $1.0 billion, down from a previous estimate of $1.45 billion.

The company's earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) in the first quarter were 6.1 billion Swedish crowns ($702 million) excluding non-recurring items, down from 6.2 billion a year ago, and in line with a mean forecast in a Reuters poll.

Telia stuck to its 2017 forecast of a free cash flow above 7 billion crowns and an operating profit (EBITDA) and dividends around the same level as in 2016.

Telia shares were up by 1.1 percent by 0856 GMT.

($1 = 8.7618 Swedish crowns) (Reporting by Helena Soderpalm and Olof Swahnberg, editing by Niklas Pollard and Louise Heavens)
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pamir Energy Company among international finalists for the 2017 Ashden Award

15:31, march 27Author: Asia-Plus

Pamir Energy Company is one of the international finalists for the prestigious Ashden Award.

The 2017 Ashden Award judges have reportedly narrowed down the finalists for this year’s Awards to 22 impressive organizations, covering what they consider to be the best in sustainable energy around the world.

International finalists are truly global, with projects in Tajikistan, Nepal, Lesotho, East Africa, West Africa, India, China and Malaysia that are supporting best practice in sustainable buildings, clean energy for women and girls, innovative finance, clean energy and water, powering business and sustainable travel.

The following are international finalists: Africa Clean Energy, Ampere Vehicles, Angaza Design, Ecolibirium, Empower Generation, Futurepump, GPS Renewables, Haileybury Youth Trust, Hangzhou Bicycles, Mobisol, Pamir Energy, PEG Africa, SunCulture, and T.R Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd.

Winners will be announced at the Awards Ceremony at the Royal Geographical Society in London on June 15, 2017. They will receive a financial award of up to £20,000, along with tailored support and other help to promote their work.

Former Vice-President of the USA, Al Gore will be the keynote speaker of the 2017 Ashden Awards Ceremony.

Funders of the 2017 Ashden Awards include Citi, the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, the Garfield Weston Foundation, Grosvenor, the Ikea Foundation, Impax Asset Management, UK aid, and the Waterloo Foundation.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and a five-year civil war, Tajikistan’s electrical infrastructure required major investment. Among the most affected areas was the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO), where people and economic development suffered during the cold winter months.

The Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED), in partnership with the International Finance Corporation (IFC), formed the Pamir Energy Company in 2002 to address the situation.

Pamir Energy is a joint project of the Government of Tajikistan, AKFED, IFC, and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). A total cost of the project is some 26.5 million U.S. dollars, including the Tajik government’s contribution of 10 million U.S. dollars.

The project was designed as a public-private partnership between the Government of Tajikistan, the World Bank Group, and the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development.

The company has a 25 year concession on the assets formerly under the management on Barqi Tojik (Tajik electricity supplier) in GBAO. In exchange for this concession (management right), Pamir Energy has invested in completing the Pamir hydropower station, rehabilitating power generation, transmission and distribution assets, and improving the management of the company.

The Pamir Private Power Project has helped to enhance development and improve welfare in GBAO by providing reliable, affordable, and clean electricity.

http://www.news.tj/en/news/tajikistan/economic/20170327/237943
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pamir Energy wins prestigious Ashden Award for bringing clean energy to East Tajikistan and North Afghanistan

London, United Kingdom, 12 June 2017 - Pamir Energy has won the 2017 International Ashden Award for Increasing Energy Access for its work bringing hydro power to 220,000 people in East Tajikistan and 35,000 people in North Afghanistan, as well as to many businesses, schools, and health centres.

The Ashden Awards are a globally recognised measure of excellence in the field of sustainable energy. International winners receive £20,000 in prize money as well as a tailored package of business support to scale up their work.

The area of Viloyati Mukhtori Kuhistoni Badakhshan (VMKB), where Pamir Energy operates, is not connected to the main Tajik national grid and lost most of its electricity infrastructure as a result of the collapse of the Soviet Union. Fifteen years ago only 13% of households in the region had reliable energy.

To address these crippling energy issues, in 2002, the Government of Tajikistan, the International Finance Corporation and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) established Pamir Energy, Tajikistan’s first public private partnership. Pamir Energy (an AKDN project company) has an agreement with the Government of Tajikistan to supply power to the whole of VMKB until 2027.

More...
http://www.akdn.org/press-release/pamir-energy-wins-prestigious-ashden-award-bringing-clean-energy-east-tajikistan-and


********
Ashden winners

Pamir Energy / Bringing power to the people of Tajikistan and Afghanistan


The first public-private partnership in Tajikistan, Pamir Energy has so far restored 11 small hydro power plants and upgraded 4300km of old transmission and distribution facilities in East Tajikistan.


As a result, 96% of households there, some 200,000 people, now have access to clean, reliable and affordable electricity. More recently, communities across the border in northern Afghanistan have been connected and are able to access electricity too, some for the very first time.

The availability electricity means that students can study in the evenings; doctors can perform life-saving surgery; families can warm their homes without producing harmful smoke or using wood for fuel (70% of local forest lost); women can free up their time to start new enterprises; and the mountainous communities of the Pamirs can connect to the rest of the world.

More...
https://www.ashden.org/winners/pamir-energy
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.news.tj/en/news/tajikistan/economic/20170630/pamir-energy-to-spend-ashden-award-prize-money-for-construction-of-small-hydropower-plant-in-bartang

05 july 2017 22:32 TJT Dushanbe

Pamir Energy to spend Ashden Award prize money for construction of small hydropower plant in Bartang
18:04, june 30Author: Asia-Plus


Pamir Energy intends to spend the Ashden Award prize money for construction of a small hydropower plant in the Bartang Valley, Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO).

Under agreement with the Board of Directors, the company has decided to spend the Ashden Award prize money (£20,000) for construction of a small hydropower plant with capacity of 100 kW in the Roshorv village, Bartang Valley, according to press release issued by Pamir Energy.

A total cost of the project is 324,000 U.S. dollars and the company plans to attract the remaining 274,000 U.S. dollars in close cooperation with potential donors. The power plant will provide with electricity 164 households (nearly 1,200 people) in the Roshorv village.

Recall, Pamir Energy has won the 2017 International Ashden Award for Increasing Energy Access for its work bringing hydro power to 220,000 people in southeastern Tajikistan and 35,000 people in northern Afghanistan, as well as to many businesses, schools, and health centers.

The Ashden Awards are a globally recognized measure of excellence in the field of sustainable energy. International winners receive £20,000 in prize money as well as a tailored package of business support to scale up their work.

According to the Ashden judges: “Pamir Energy’s approach to providing hydro power to a whole population in a remote mountainous area is highly replicable and could apply to other hard to reach mountainous parts of the world. By tackling the full range of energy needs and effective distribution the company is bringing about a massive step change in the lives of local residents.”

Pamir Energy received its Ashden Award on June 15, 2017 at a prestigious ceremony at the Royal Geographical Society in London.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and a five-year civil war, Tajikistan’s electrical infrastructure required major investment. Among the most affected areas was the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (GBAO), where people and economic development suffered during the cold winter months.

The Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED), in partnership with the International Finance Corporation (IFC), formed the Pamir Energy Company in 2002 to address the situation. Fifteen years ago only 13% of households in the region had reliable energy.

Pamir Energy is a joint project of the Government of Tajikistan, AKFED, IFC, and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). A total cost of the project is some 26.5 million U.S. dollars, including the Tajik government’s contribution of 10 million U.S. dollars.

The project was designed as a public-private partnership between the Government of Tajikistan, the World Bank Group, and the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development.

The company has a 25 year concession on the assets formerly under the management on Barqi Tojik (Tajik electricity supplier) in GBAO. In exchange for this concession (management right), Pamir Energy has invested in completing the Pamir hydropower station, rehabilitating power generation, transmission and distribution assets, and improving the management of the company.

The Pamir Private Power Project has helped to enhance development and improve welfare in GBAO by providing reliable, affordable, and clean electricity.

Since 2002, Pamir Energy has restored 11 micro hydro power plants and upgraded 4,300km of transmission lines, as well as distribution facilities. During critical phases of the project, the Swiss government, through the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO), provided vital support through an innovative customer support scheme and the provision of technology that ensured affordable access for the poorest households in GBAO.

Today, 96% of households in GBAO, some 220,000 people, have access to clean, reliable and affordable energy. In 2008, the company began exporting energy across the Panj River to communities in northern Afghanistan – some receiving electricity for the first time in their history. Currently, 35,000 Afghans are connected. The company plans to reach thousands more customers in Afghanistan in the coming years and to expand its operations to Northern Pakistan by 2025.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EU funds project to build a bridge at Tajikistan-Afghanistan border

https://www.timesca.com/index.php/news/18338-eu-funds-project-to-build-a-bridge-at-tajikistan-afghanistan-border

DUSHANBE (TCA) — A High-Level EU mission has paid an official visit to Tajikistan. The mission consisted of Mr. Stefano Manservisi, Director-General of the European Commission's Directorate-General for International Cooperation, and Mr. Peter Burian, EU Special Representative for Central Asia. They arrived to look into the current EU–Tajikistan relations, in particular in the process of implementation of the country`s New Development Strategy 2016–2030, the Delegation of the European Union to Tajikistan reported.

The EU mission on July 12 visited the Shamsiddin-Shohin district, at the Tajik-Afghan border, where the EU launched a new project, in agreement with the Tajik and Afghan governments, for building of a bridge in Farkhor district, the rehabilitation of a road and river bank stabilization. The project will foster local private sector and markets development contributing to peace, resilience and trade facilitation in the region. The project will be implemented by Aga Khan Foundation and PATRIP Foundation . The project has a budget of EUR 16 million and is funded by the European Union.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My travels in Tajikistan

STEPHANIE ORTYNSKY Feb 16, 2017


Working in Tajikistan with the Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS), as part of the Aga Khan Foundation Canada’s Youth Fellowship Program has been quite the experience thus far.

I am a PhD student in the School of Public Health Vaccinology and Immunotherapeutics program, and this experience has significantly complemented my PhD studies. I have learned a lot about data collection, qualitative research methods and knowledge dissemination while working in a completely different environment and health care system to Canada’s.

Tajikistan’s health care system is largely based on the previous Soviet model. After the break-up of the Soviet Union and a substantial decrease in funding, the system became non-functional. The civil war of 1992 to1997 exasperated the situation and the country shifted from a state-run to market-based system. The government of Tajikistan relies heavily on donor funding and the capacity of local non-governmental organizations to provide basic, quality health services to much of the rural population.

I am based in Khorog, a town in the Pamir mountains of about 30,000 people near the Tajik-Afghan border. My job title is Monitoring and Evaluation (M and E) Fellow, and a team of two colleagues and I are tasked with carrying out activities that help to improve the performance and achieve results for AKHS’ projects.

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https://www.usask.ca/sph/articles/2017/steph-ortynsky-tajikistan.php
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AKDN IN
Tajikistan


AKDN works towards the vision of an economically dynamic, politically stable, intellectually vibrant and culturally tolerant Tajikistan.  Operating in Tajikistan since 1992, AKDN draws on a strong base of experience in working with mountain societies. It works in all regions of the country and employs over 3,500 people through its operations and investments. AKDN supports the establishment of programmes and institutions that allow the Government, private sector and civil society to play complementary roles in increasing prosperity and creativity within a pluralistic society

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http://www.akdn.org/where-we-work/central-asia/tajikistan
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan Foundation announces inauguration of a new Cross Boarder Energy Line – Rushan I

Earlier this month the Aga Khan Foundation announced the inauguration of a new cross boarder energy line in Rushan, Eastern Tajikistan which it has supported. Installed by Pamir Energy, an Aga Khan Development Network project company, it was supported by the German and Tajikistan Governments.

This new energy line will provide long-term sustainable energy to five villages in the Rushan district, bringing light and warmth to 7,800 people in Tajikistan and in Northern Afghanistan. For many this will be the first time they will be receiving energy.

Access to this energy will allow development of the regions, encouraging businesses to grow, resulting in more employment opportunities. There will also be improved health conditions for individuals, as well as a significant environmental impact due to more limited reliance on wood and diesel, which led to deforestation and carbon emissions.

You can read more about this life changing project here.

http://www.efc.be/news/aga-khan-foundation-introduces-a-new-cross-boarder-energy-line-rushan-i/
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Promoting Clinical Breast Evaluations in a Lower Middle–Income Country Setting: An Approach Toward Achieving a Sustainable Breast Health Program

ABSTRACT

Purpose
To promote a systems-based approach for the early detection and downstaging of breast cancer at presentation in the remote mountainous region of Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast (GBAO), Tajikistan, by introducing breast cancer awareness into the community and training health care professionals in clinical breast evaluation (CBE).

Methods
Through a public-private partnership between the Ministry of Health, the Aga Khan Health Services, Tajikistan, and the Aga Khan Health Board, we organized breast cancer screening in the community and trained family medicine doctors (FMDs) and family medicine nurses (FMNs) in CBE. We identified and trained CBE master trainers, who, in turn, systematically trained FMNs to conduct CBEs in each of the remote regional clinics.

Results
Between 2014 and 2017, 47 FMDs (85% of all FMDs in GBAO), 166 FMNs (55% of all FMNs in GBAO), and six master trainers were trained. Of 3,556 women who were screened, abnormal CBEs were noted in 696 of them (20%). Of the last 1,101 CBEs that were performed by trainee FMNs, with secondary CBEs by master trainers, the rate of abnormal CBEs plateaued at 9%. A total of 18 women were diagnosed with breast cancer—2.6% of abnormal CBEs and 0.5% of all screened women.

Conclusion
A dual-pronged approach of community awareness and CBE training of health care professionals, supported by CBE master trainers, offers a sustainable approach for the early detection of breast pathology. We observed anecdotal evidence of clinical early-stage detection over time with improved CBE proficiency and community acceptance. Sustaining this program will require advocacy by health care providers and a responsive public policy to support the early detection and treatment of breast cancer across the region.

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http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JGO.17.00103
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Pamir Energy Story

Wednesday 10th May 2017: Daler Jumaev, General Director of Pamir Energy, spoke about how the company transformed a dilapidated Soviet utility to provide reliable, affordable and clean energy to this region, and how it is helping to build brighter futures and promote cross-border cooperation in one of the world’s most remote areas.

Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsy_aScjj-k
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more bridge across the Panj River will connect Tajikistan and Afghanistan

01 ,may 2019

The Government of Tajikistan has approved a draft agreement between the Ministry of Transport of Tajikistan and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) Tajikistan on cooperation on construction of a new Tajik-Afghan bridge across the Panj River.

The agreement provides for construction of the bridge across the Panj River that will consolidate permanent overland links between Tajikistan and Afghanistan in the Tajik southern Khatlon province.

The 180-meter bridge will connect the Kokul area in Khatlon’s Farkhor district and the Ai-Khanoum village in Takhar province, northern Afghanistan.

The project also provides construction of a 50 kilometer road from Vose district to Farkhor district.

The AKDN will implement the project with attraction of investments from partners. The European Union will finance the project through Germany’s KFW Development Bank and the Pakistan Afghanistan Tajikistan Regional Integration Program (PATRIP) Foundation

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https://www.asiaplus.tj/en/news/tajikistan/economic/20190412/one-more-bridge-across-the-panj-river-will-connect-tajikistan-and-afghanistan?mc_cid=09b2d065bc&mc_eid=25c8c5fc8d
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PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2019 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.novastan.org/fr/tadjikistan/comment-la-fondation-aga-khan-tente-de-se-maintenir-au-tadjikistan/

Comment la Fondation Aga Khan tente de se maintenir au Tadjikistan

2019, May 21:



L’Aga Khan (à droite) est l’un des principaux bailleurs de fonds pour le développement du Tadjikistan. Sur cette photo prise en octobre 2011, il est en présence du président tadjik Emomalii Rahmon. Fondation Aga Khan

Reconnue comme l’un des principaux acteurs du développement au Tadjikistan, la Fondation Aga Khan compte pour la première fois un citoyen tadjik comme représentant permanent dans le pays. En tant que médiateur dans l’ultrasensible région du Haut-Badakchan, la Fondation Aga Khan est aujourd’hui dans une posture délicate.

Novastan reprend et traduit ici un article initialement publié par l’agence Fergana News

Tout un symbole. Le 17 avril dernier, la Fondation Aga Khan pour le Développement (AKDN) a nommé son nouveau responsable au Tadjikistan. Pour la première fois depuis 26 ans d’activités dans la République tadjike, un citoyen du pays devient le représentant permanent de l’organisation. Kozidavlat Koïmdodov, ancien fonctionnaire du Parti et diplomate de 69 ans, succède ainsi au Pakistanais Ali Akbar Pesnani.

La Fondation Aga Khan tient sa puissance et son nom de Shah Karim Al Hussaini, qui porte le titre d’Aga Khan depuis 1957. Ce titre implique que l’Aga Khan est le leader spirituel des Ismaéliens, une branche de l’islam chiite. Les dons faits par les Ismaéliens vont directement alimenter la fortune de l’Aga Khan, estimée à 3 milliards de dollars. Le prince Shah Karim Al Hussaini est également appelé Aga Khan IV.

Lire aussi sur Novastan : Le Tadjikistan, berceau des Ismaéliens

Au Tadjikistan, où seuls 3% des musulmans sont d’obédience ismaélienne, l’AKDN joue un rôle important dans le développement. Au milieu des années 1990, la fondation s’est engagée au Tadjikistan de manière active en promouvant des projets humanitaires. Son activité s’est d’abord traduite par l’apport d’une aide alimentaire aux habitants de la province autonome du Haut-Badakchan, dans l’est du pays, qui étaient confrontés à une catastrophe humanitaire à l’époque de la guerre civile (1992-1997). Le Haut-Badakchan est également peuplé en majorité d’Ismaéliens.

Un bailleur indispensable au Haut-Badakchan

La fondation s’est progressivement orientée vers la promotion de projets socioéconomiques, culturels et humanitaires. C’est grâce au fonds de la Fondation Aga Khan sur le territoire du Haut-Badakhchan que la centrale hydroélectrique du Pamir (aujourd’hui connue sous le nom de Pamir Energy) s’est modernisée. Elle assure aujourd’hui sans interruption l’électricité de la région. Cinq ponts ont été construits et relient le Badakhchan tadjik au Badakhchan afghan, l’ensemble scolaire Aga Khan et l’université internationale d’Asie centrale ont été construits dans la ville de Khorog, ainsi qu’une clinique moderne et d’autres infrastructures de moyenne et petite tailles.

Novastan est le seul média en français et en allemand spécialisé sur l'Asie centrale. Entièrement associatif, il fonctionne grâce à votre participation. Nous sommes indépendants et pour le rester, nous avons besoin de vous ! Vous pouvez nous soutenir à partir de 2 euros par mois, ou en devenant membre par ici.

Lire aussi sur Novastan : Tadjikistan : le Pamir oriental au bord du gouffre

La Fondation Aga Khan a également investi dans un certain nombre d’affaires. C’est la première banque de microfinance depuis de nombreuses années, dont les crédits soutiennent l’entreprenariat local. Elle a également investi dans l’hôtel Serena et la société de télécommunications Tcell (anciennement Indigo Tadjikistan). Les projets commerciaux incluent également la compagnie d’énergie Pamir Energy. Le montant total des dépenses de la fondation au Tadjikistan n’est pas connu, mais comme le souligne dans l’une de ses interviews Yodgor Faïzov, ancien directeur exécutif de l’AKDN et désormais chef de la fondation au Haut-Badakhchan, le montant annuel des investissements au Tadjikistan s’élèvent à 70 millions de dollars.

Une image quasi-sacrée…

Au cours des dernières années, les activités de la Fondation Aga Khan ont pratiquement permis d’assumer les fonctions socio-économiques de l’Etat du Haut-Badakhchan, construisant ainsi une image positive de la Fondation. Cette image était d’ailleurs perçue comme sacrée par les habitants du Pamir, puisque l’Aga Khan est le chef spirituel des Ismaéliens.

Lire aussi sur Novastan : Bienvenue sur Mars : le district de Mourghab au Tadjikistan

C’est dans ce contexte qu’intervient la nomination de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov au poste de chef de l’AKDN. Cette ascension montre avant tout la rotation habituelle des cadres et le passage d’un fonctionnaire au sein de la fondation après son départ en retraite. Néanmoins, cette nomination mérite une attention particulière et donne à réfléchir sur l’activité de la structure et ses relations officielles avec la capitale Douchanbé, qui n’ont pas été très lisses au cours des dernières années.

… qui pourrait être entachée par un diplomate à la réputation ambiguë

A cet égard, la nomination de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov à la tête de l’AKDN pourrait continuer à alimenter la polémique. De fait, son ascension a suscité des réactions mitigées dans la société et donné lieu à des discussions parmi les principaux bénéficiaires de l’organisation, en l’occurrence les habitants de la région autonome du Haut-Badakhchan. Dans des discussions sur les réseaux sociaux, quelques-uns ont soutenu cette nomination, tandis que d’autres ont exprimé une opposition catégorique, l’accusant de ne pas participer à la résolution des problèmes des autochtones.
Pamir Tadjikistan
Le massif du Pamir près de la ville de Khorog, en Haut-Badakchan.
S Nazari

La controverse à l’égard de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov a plusieurs sources. En 2013, son fils Koïmdod Koïmdodov s’est trouvé impliqué dans le trafic de drogue avec sa femme Mouchtar Mouborakchoïev. Ils ont été placés en détention alors qu’ils attendaient l’embarquement d’un vol pour Moscou à l’aéroport de Douchanbé avec 2,5 kilos d’héroïne. Après sa détention, Koïmdodov junior a déclaré que les narcotiques n’appartenaient pas à lui mais à son épouse. En fin de compte, Koïmdod Koïmdodov a été relâché, mais sa femme condamnée à 12 ans et demi de réclusion. Elle a été plus tard amnistiée. Dans les années 1990, après une visite de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov dans la province autonome du Haut-Badakhchan, son garde du corps avait déjà été arrêté en possession de drogues. Malgré cela, l’autorité de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov devant le chef de l’Etat tadjik Emomalii Rahmon n’a pas été fragilisée. Il a continué à occuper ses fonctions d’ambassadeur du Tadjikistan en Biélorussie et n’a pris sa retraite que quatre ans plus tard, en décembre 2017.

2012, année charnière

Mais plus que la drogue, ce sont les évènements de Khorog en 2012 qui ont véritablement nui à la réputation de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov. Au moment même où des opérations spéciales menées dans la capitale du Haut-Badakchan faisaient des dizaines de victimes parmi la population civile et les représentants de forces de l’ordre, Kozidavlat Koïmdodov a officiellement manifesté son soutien à la position des autorités tadjikes. Et ce alors que la population de Khorog manifestait en appelant au retrait des contingents armés supplémentaires déployés dans la province. Comme le régionalisme n’a disparu nulle part au Tadjikistan et que la politique régionaliste suscitait de grands espoirs parmi ses compatriotes, cette déclaration a sérieusement écorné l’image de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov.

Lire aussi sur Novastan : Des femmes tadjikes viennent en aide aux habitantes du Haut-Badakhchan

Les évènements de Khorog n’ont pas seulement constitué une épreuve décisive pour le diplomate mais aussi pour les activités elles-mêmes de la Fondation Aga Khan pour le développement du Tadjikistan. En effet, du fait de cette image quasi-sacrée, l’Aga Khan et son organisation ont servi de médiateur entre les anciens chefs de guerre du Pamir et les autorités de Douchanbé au cours des évènements de juillet-août 2012. L’Aga Khan a ainsi appelé ses adeptes du Badakhchan à déposer volontairement leurs armes et à un cessez-le-feu afin de parvenir à la paix. Les braises du conflit se sont éteintes. Pourtant, à la fin du mois d’août, Imomnazar Imonazarov, l’un des leaders informels les plus influents du Pamir, a été assassiné dans sa propre maison. Ses camarades ont alors affirmé que le pouvoir était derrière l’assassinat et des rassemblements ont commencé à Khorog.

Une position instable

L’AKDN et le président de la région Yodgor Faïzov en personne ont alors une nouvelle fois assumé les fonctions d’intermédiaires dans les négociations de la province autonome du Haut-Badakhchan avec le pouvoir. Grâce à la médiation de l’organisation, le retrait des troupes de la région a été obtenu. Pour les ONG internationales qui ne disposent pas de mandat politique, obtenir la pacification était un résultat sans précédent. Après le meurtre d’un dirigeant influent, l’autorité de l’organisation a néanmoins décliné auprès de ses bénéficiaires. Beaucoup en sont venus à la conclusion que l’AKDN n’était pas en mesure d’offrir des instruments contraignants pour forcer le gouvernement à remplir ses engagements.
Khorogh Tadjikistan Haut-Badakhchan
Khorogh est la capitale de la région autonome du Haut-Badakhchan dans l’est du Tadjikistan. La région couvre près de la moitié du territoire tadjik, mais elle est extrêmement peu peuplée : seulement 3% environ de la population tadjike vit ici, la plupart d’entre eux dans la capitale Khorogh.
Kaisu Raasakka

À Douchanbé, les évènements de Khorog sont sujets à des sentiments partagés. D’un côté, le conflit a été résolu, quoiqu’avec le temps il semble davantage gelé. D’autre part, il s’est avéré qu’une entité étrangère, certes de dimension internationale comme l’est l’Aga Khan, pouvait avoir une influence directe sur le cours des évènements politiques au Tadjikistan. Cette évolution a mené le pouvoir tadjik à repenser son attitude à l’égard du leader du monde ismaélien.

Il semble que l’Aga Khan lui-même a également reconsidéré sa position. En tant que chef d’une communauté de près de 20 millions de personnes, se positionnant lui-même comme le protecteur de la sécurité de ses adeptes, l’Aga Khan a probablement compris qu’on ne peut n’attendre aucune garantie de la part des autorités officielles de Douchanbé. En cessant de se rendre au Tadjikistan après sa dernière visite en avril 2012, il a peut-être voulu manifester son mécontentement, et ce, malgré les multiples projets mis en place par son organisation au cours des dernières années sur le territoire de la province autonome du Haut-Badakhchan, en particulier l’université d’Asie centrale (90 millions de dollars investis), le Centre Ismaélien (15 millions de dollars) et le Centre médical (24 millions de dollars).

Des tensions latentes

Comme le remarquent des sources de Fergana News, les relations de l’AKDN avec le gouvernement ces dernières années n’ont pas été très claires. Selon ces sources, ces relations parfois tendues ont été particulièrement visibles au moment de la cérémonie d’ouverture de l’université d’Asie centrale à Khorog en septembre 2018. Le président tadjik Emomalii Rahmon a alors exprimé son mécontentement à l’égard des activités de l’AKDN, en soulignant que si ce dont s’occupait aujourd’hui l’AKDN était autrefois visible, sa mission était aujourd’hui incompréhensible. Il a aussi vivement critiqué la politique de ressources humaines menée par l’organisation, puisque de nombreuses fonctions sont attribuées à des ressortissants étrangers, en particulier des Pakistanais. Un petit signe qui ne trompe pas : bien que le mécontentement ne soit plus ouvertement exprimé au niveau officiel, la licence pour la tenue des activités éducatives de l’université d’Asie centrale n’a été reçue qu’un an après la fin de la construction et le début réel du travail.

Lire aussi sur Novastan : Le président tadjik a ouvert officiellement l’Université d’Asie Centrale à Khorog

Pour autant, la nomination de Kozidavlat Koïmdodov au poste de représentant permanent des structures de l’Aga Khan au Tadjikistan est logique. Jusqu’en 2005, le fonctionnaire était coordinateur gouvernemental de l’AKDN dans la République tadjike. Il a réussi à maintenir des relations de confiance avec l’Aga Khan en personne comme avec le président tadjik. Malgré son image entachée à plusieurs reprises dans sa carrière, c’est probablement pour cette raison qu’il a été nommé à la tête de l’AKDN : à défaut d’améliorer les relations, il pourra au moins maintenir le statu quo. Il est essentiel pour l’Aga Khan de conserver sa présence dans un pays où les Ismaéliens représentent certes une minorité confessionnelle, mais la majorité de la population dans la province autonome du Haut-Badakhchan.

Chavkat Nazarov
Rédacteur pour Fergana News

Traduit du russe par Antonia Collard-Nora

Edité par Etienne Combier
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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2019 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Google translation of the above article.

How the Aga Khan Foundation tries to stay in Tajikistan

Recognized as one of the main development actors in Tajikistan, the Aga Khan Foundation for the first time counts a Tajik citizen as a permanent representative in the country. As a mediator in the ultra-sensitive region of Upper Badakchan, the Aga Khan Foundation is today in a delicate position.

Novastan reprints and translates an article originally published by Fergana News

All a symbol. On April 17, the Aga Khan Foundation for Development (AKDN) appointed its new head in Tajikistan. For the first time in 26 years of activities in the Tajik Republic, a citizen of the country becomes the permanent representative of the organization. Kozidavlat Koidodov, a former Party official and a 69-year-old diplomat, succeeds Ali Akbar Pesnani of Pakistan.

The Aga Khan Foundation holds its power and name from Shah Karim Al Hussaini , who has been known as Aga Khan since 1957. This title implies that the Aga Khan is the spiritual leader of the Ismailis , a branch of Shia Islam. The donations made by the Ismailis will directly feed the fortune of the Aga Khan, estimated at $ 3 billion. Prince Shah Karim Al Hussaini is also called Aga Khan IV.

Read also about Novastan: Tajikistan, cradle of Ismailis

In Tajikistan, where only 3% of Muslims are of Ismaili faith, the AKDN plays an important role in development. In the mid-1990s, the foundation actively engaged in Tajikistan by promoting humanitarian projects. Its activity began with the provision of food aid to the inhabitants of the autonomous province of Upper Badakchan , in the east of the country, who were facing a humanitarian disaster at the time of the war. civil society (1992-1997). Upper Badakchan is also inhabited mainly by Ismailis .

An indispensable landlord in Upper Badakchan

The foundation has gradually moved towards the promotion of socio-economic, cultural and humanitarian projects. It is thanks to the fund of the Aga Khan Foundation on the territory of Upper Badakhshan that the Pamir hydroelectric power plant (now known as Pamir Energy) has been modernized. It continuously provides electricity to the region. Five bridges have been constructed linking Badakhshan to Afghan Badakhshan, the Aga Khan School Complex and the International University of Central Asia were built in Khorog City , as well as a modern clinic and other health infrastructure. medium and small sizes.

Novastan is the only media in French and German specializing in Central Asia. Entirely associative, it works thanks to your participation . We are independent and to stay, we need you! You can support us from 2 euros per month , or by becoming a member here .

Read also about Novastan: Tajikistan: the eastern Pamir on the brink

The Aga Khan Foundation has also invested in a number of cases. It is the first microfinance bank for many years, whose credits support local entrepreneurship. It has also invested in Hotel Serena and telecommunications company Tcell (formerly Indigo Tajikistan). Commercial projects also include the energy company Pamir Energy. The total amount of the foundation's expenses in Tajikistan is not known, but as one Yodgor Fizovov, former executive director of the AKDN and now head of the Badakhshan Foundation, points out in one of his interviews, the amount annual investment in Tajikistan is $ 70 million.

A quasi-sacred image ...

In recent years, the activities of the Aga Khan Foundation have practically taken over the socio-economic functions of the State of Upper Badakhshan, thus building a positive image of the Foundation. This image was also perceived as sacred by the inhabitants of the Pamir, since the Aga Khan is the spiritual leader of the Ismailis.

Read also about Novastan: Welcome to Mars: the district of Murghab in Tajikistan

It is in this context that the appointment of Kozidavlat Koïmdodov to the post of head of the AKDN comes into play. This rise shows above all the usual rotation of the executives and the passage of an official within the foundation after his retirement. Nevertheless, this appointment deserves special attention and gives some thought to the activity of the structure and its official relations with the capital Dushanbe, which have not been very smooth in recent years.

... that could be tainted by a diplomat with an ambiguous reputation

In this regard, the appointment of Kozidavlat Koïmdodov at the head of the AKDN could continue to fuel the controversy. In fact, its rise has provoked mixed reactions in society and led to discussions among the main beneficiaries of the organization, namely the inhabitants of the Autonomous Region of Upper Badakhshan. In some social media discussions, some supported this nomination, while others voiced categorical opposition, accusing it of not participating in aboriginal issues.

Pamir TajikistanThe Pamir Massif near the town of Khorog, in Upper Badakchan.
S Nazari
The controversy over Kozidavlat Koidmdodov has several sources. In 2013, his son Koïmdod Koïmdodov became involved in drug trafficking with his wife Mouchtar Mukorakchoyev. They were detained while waiting for a flight to Moscow at Dushanbe airport with 2.5 kilos of heroin. After his detention, junior Koïmdodov declared that narcotics did not belong to him but to his wife. In the end, Koïmdod Koïmdodov was released, but his wife sentenced to 12 and a half years in prison. She was later amnestied. In the 1990s, after a visit by Kozidavlat Koïmdodov to the autonomous province of Upper Badakhshan, his bodyguard had already been arrested in possession of drugs. Despite this, the authority of Kozidavlat Koïmdodov in front of the head of the Tajik stateEmomalii Rahmon has not been weakened. He continued to serve as ambassador of Tajikistan to Belarus and only retired four years later, in December 2017.

2012, pivotal year

But more than drugs, it was the events of Khorog in 2012 that really hurt the reputation of Kozidavlat Koïmdodov. At a time when special operations in the capital of Upper Badakchan were killing scores of civilians and law enforcement officials, Kozidavlat Koidmododov officially expressed support for the position of the Tajik authorities. And this while the population of Khorog was demonstrating by calling for the withdrawal of additional armed contingents deployed in the province. As regionalism did not disappear anywhere in Tajikistan and regionalist politics raised high hopes among its compatriots, this statement seriously undermined Kozidavlat Koïmdodov's image.

Read also about Novastan: Tajik women help residents of Upper Badakhshan

The events in Khorog were not only a milestone for the diplomat but also for the activities themselves of the Aga Khan Foundation for the Development of Tajikistan. Indeed, because of this quasi-sacred image, the Aga Khan and his organization mediated between the former Pamir warlords and the authorities of Dushanbe during the events of July-August 2012. The Aga Khan thus called on its followers of Badakhshan to voluntarily deposit their arms and a cease-fire in order to achieve peace. The embers of the conflict have gone out. Yet at the end of August, Imomnazar Imonazarov, one of Pamir's most influential informal leaders, was murdered in his own home.

An unstable position

The AKDN and the President of the region Yodgor Fizovov in person then once again assumed the functions of intermediaries in the negotiations of the autonomous province of Upper Badakhshan with power. Thanks to the mediation of the organization, the withdrawal of troops from the region was obtained. For international NGOs that do not have a political mandate, securing peace was an unprecedented outcome. After the murder of an influential leader, the authority of the organization nevertheless declined among its beneficiaries. Many have come to the conclusion that the AKDN is not in a position to offer binding instruments to force the government to fulfill its commitments.

Khorogh Tajikistan Upper BadakhshanKhorogh is the capital of the Upper Badakhshan Autonomous Region in eastern Tajikistan. The region covers almost half of Tajik territory, but it is extremely sparsely populated: only about 3% of the Tajik population lives here, most of them in the capital Khorogh.
Kaisu Raasakka
In Dushanbe, the events of Khorog are subject to shared feelings. On the one hand, the conflict has been resolved, though with time it seems more frozen. On the other hand, it turned out that a foreign entity, certainly of international dimension as is the Aga Khan, could have a direct influence on the course of political events in Tajikistan. This evolution led the Tajik authorities to rethink their attitude toward the leader of the Ismaili world.

It seems that the Aga Khan himself has also reconsidered his position. As the leader of a community of nearly 20 million people , positioning himself as the protector of the security of his followers, the Aga Khan probably understood that no guarantee can be from the official authorities of Dushanbe. In stopping his visit to Tajikistan after his last visit in April 2012, he may have wished to express his dissatisfaction, despite the many projects his organization has put in place in recent years in the territory of the autonomous province. of Upper Badakhshan, in particular the University of Central Asia ($ 90 million invested), the Ismaili Center ($ 15 million) and the Medical Center ($ 24 million).

Latent tensions

As noted by Fergana News sources, AKDN's relations with the government in recent years have not been very clear. According to these sources, these sometimes tense relations were particularly visible at the opening ceremony of the University of Central Asia in Khorog in September 2018.. Tajik President Emomalii Rahmon then expressed his dissatisfaction with AKDN's activities, stressing that while what the AKDN was dealing with today was once visible, its mission today is incomprehensible. He also strongly criticized the organization's human resources policy, since many functions are attributed to foreign nationals, especially Pakistanis. A small sign that does not deceive: although discontent is no longer openly expressed at the official level, the license for the holding of educational activities of the University of Central Asia was received one year after the end of construction and the actual start of work.

Read also about Novastan: The Tajik President officially opened the University of Central Asia in Khorog

However, the appointment of Kozidavlat Koïmdodov as permanent representative of the structures of the Aga Khan in Tajikistan makes sense. Until 2005, the official was the AKDN's government coordinator in the Tajik Republic. He managed to maintain trusting relationships with the Aga Khan himself as well as with the Tajik president. Despite his stained image several times in his career, it is probably for this reason that he was appointed head of the AKDN: failing to improve relations, he can at least maintain the status quo. It is essential for the Aga Khan to maintain its presence in a country where the Ismaili are certainly a sectarian minority, but the majority of the population in the Autonomous Province of Upper Badakhshan.

Chavkat Nazarov
Editor for Fergana News

Translated from Russian by Antonia Collard-Nora

Published by Etienne Combier

https://www.novastan.org/fr/tadjikistan/comment-la-fondation-aga-khan-tente-de-se-maintenir-au-tadjikistan/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19159

PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rukhshod’s Story: Ensuring financial services in rural areas

Meet Rukhshod, director of a national micro-lending organisation (MLO) in Tajikistan, with five branches across three regions. Once a simple housewife in a small village, Rukshod’s journey into this position began when she became the manager of the women’s committee of a small village organisation. Her natural ability to engage community members to ensure all voices were heard gained her early respect and recognition amongst her peers. In 2007, when several village organisations in her area merged into a federation, Rukhshod was selected to lead it, and thrived doing so. Four years later, in 2011, Rukhshod was appointed director of the regional MLO ‘’Rushdi Pomir”. Thanks to Economic and Social Connections: A Multi-Input Area Development Financing Facility for Tajikistan (ESCoMIAD), a joint project of the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Rukhshod received trainings in business planning, financial statement analysis and cash management that enabled her to excel in this role. Her background in economics also paved the way for quick absorption of the material.

Over the last few years, ESCoMIAD has made significant strides in developing the capacity of staff like Rukhshod, while also strengthening MLOs to create an environment that makes financial services accessible to low-income, rural households.

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https://www.akdn.org/our-stories/rukhshods-story-ensuring-financial-services-rural-areas
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19159

PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2019 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Educating Pakistan: Taking inspiration from Tajikistan

Excerpt:

To meet the gap is services, the country welcomed the assistance from civil society organisations such as The Aga Khan Education Services (AKES) to help her build better opportunities for its people. AKES stepped in Tajikistan in 1995 to address educational needs such as the professional trainings of teachers for capacity building, strengthening existing schools and providing scholarships to meritorious students from poor families. In this regard, Government, Agha Khan Foundation (AKF) Education, Mountain Societies Development Support Programme (MSDSP) and other NGOs worked well to rehabilitate many schools, to add new classrooms, to re-train teachers, to make Parent Teacher Associations active and to increase teachers’ salaries to achieve the desired results. Consequently, the condition of schools became much better with the provision of good education.

In addition, Agha Khan Foundation has recently initiated a programme, Early Childhood Development (ECD) in Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Oblast/Region. AKF/MSDSP also formed the Community Institutions (CIs) like Village Organisations (VOs) and Social Union for Development of Village Organisations (SUDVOs) to discuss and to solve socio-economic issues, try to improve access to social services and to play a role to improve the quality of education. During the visit to the NisimGund SUDVO, district Shugnon, the chairman of Jamoat informed that their SUDVO has three committees, i. economic, ii. education and iii. agriculture. He also informed that some of the VOs have also developed the health and education emergency funds and helped in the renovation of the elementary schools. This is one of the key indicators that now more students from Jamoats/UCs attend universities at Khorog and other cities of Tajikistan.

One member of VO Porshinev, district Shugnon said, “Since I have become engaged in fruit processing activity supported by AKF, I can properly afford the education of my children.”

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https://dailytimes.com.pk/422627/educating-pakistan-taking-inspiration-from-tajikistan/
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