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Fasting
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 19628

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Muslim tradition, Ramadan is a time of heightened commitment to piety and purification through special observances such as fasting, the performance of good deeds – including charitable giving and voluntary service – and through personal sacrifices of material comforts. These observances lead to spiritual fulfilment and a sense of renewal.


Ramadan is the holy month in which Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family) received the first revelation of the Holy Qur'an. Together with other Muslims, Ismailis celebrate Ramadan as a month of special felicity “in which the Holy Qur'an was sent down as a guide to humankind…” (Qur'an 2:185).

In Muslim tradition, Ramadan is a time of heightened commitment to piety and purification through special observances such as fasting, the performance of good deeds – including charitable giving and voluntary service – and through personal sacrifices of material comforts. These observances lead to spiritual fulfilment and a sense of renewal.

The fast of Ramadan is among the pillars of the faith: “O believers, fasting has been prescribed for you as it was for those who preceded you that you may be God-fearing” (Qur'an 2:183). Thus, the fast continues a practice which pre-dates Islam, and has been rendered more humane since religion is not intended to be a cause of hardship. Muslims are urged to fast during Ramadan unless one is suffering from any physical ailment or is on a journey, in which case the prescribed period should be made up later in the year (Qur'an 2:184 – 185).

According to general Muslim belief shared by Shia and Sunni alike, the deeper purpose of fasting is understood as that of cultivating and reinforcing the spiritual and moral character of the faithful, who thus live a life of piety and balance, without forsaking the good things of this world bestowed by Allah's grace (Qur'an 7:31-32). Muslims are expected to practice self-restraint for the sake of Allah's pleasure, remaining ever conscious of His presence. Such are the truly God-fearing.

The emphasis on human character is especially underlined. A tradition of the Prophet's beloved daughter, Hazrat Bibi Fatima Zahra asks what benefit accrues to one who fasts if one does not safeguard one's tongue, ears and limbs. This ethic of self-restraint echoes strictures of the Qur'an: “the hearing, the sight, the heart – all of those shall be questioned.” (Qur'an 17:36). Only when the senses are reined in, does conscience make itself heard, and the soul experience tranquillity, well pleased with itself and well pleasing to its Lord (Qur'an 89:2icon_cool.gif.

https://the.ismaili/festival/ramadan
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shivaathervedi



Joined: 16 May 2018
Posts: 354

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On Ramadan chand raat, there was an article read in JK on blessings of Ramadan al Mubarak. Looks like it was partially adopted from an article on Ismaili gnosis. An important paragraph which was added read as, I quote:

Not only Ismailis fast in the month of Ramadan but they have to be vigil about their senses through out the year to avoid sins. The pleasant change was," Not only Ismailis fast in the month of Ramadan...", which I never heard before. It is an endorsement that Ismailis should fast in the month of Ramadan.
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Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 5906

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"endorsement" in announcements are of no theological value to Ismailis. Only those in Farmans have value. There are many many pages of discussion here on that topic.
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shivaathervedi



Joined: 16 May 2018
Posts: 354

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Admin wrote:
"endorsement" in announcements are of no theological value to Ismailis. Only those in Farmans have value. There are many many pages of discussion here on that topic.


The paper read on Ramadan Chand Raat was from ITREB. Let readers decide, was that announcement of practical value or only theological value.

Two posts above my post, kmaherali has posted an article on Ramadan adopted from "the. ismaili", an official forum of Ismailis. Let me quote a crucial line from a paragraph, ' FAST OF RAMADAN IS THE PILLAR OF FAITH'.

Note: I have been discussing matters related to Ismailim from Ismaili printed literature.
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Admin



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Posts: 5906

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shivaathervedi wrote:
Admin wrote:
"endorsement" in announcements are of no theological value to Ismailis. Only those in Farmans have value. There are many many pages of discussion here on that topic.


The paper read on Ramadan Chand Raat was from ITREB. Let readers decide, was that announcement of practical value or only theological value..


In our Ismaili faith, we follow the Imam and is Farmans , not announcements written by any lalou... There are announcement everyday, sometimes so ridiculous that one should laugh loud when hearing them. We even have leaders who tell us NOT to follow what we hear from Imam's own mouth, to wait that they approve and edit and correct what our Imam told to us in person. I laugh at those stupid people.

Imam is absolute, he is self sufficient. He is the Dasmu Avatar.

People who give priority to announcements over Farmans should find themselves some other religion, or create their own but not in this Forum.
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shivaathervedi



Joined: 16 May 2018
Posts: 354

PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Admin wrote:
shivaathervedi wrote:
Admin wrote:
"endorsement" in announcements are of no theological value to Ismailis. Only those in Farmans have value. There are many many pages of discussion here on that topic.


The paper read on Ramadan Chand Raat was from ITREB. Let readers decide, was that announcement of practical value or only theological value..


In our Ismaili faith, we follow the Imam and is Farmans , not announcements written by any lalou... There are announcement everyday, sometimes so ridiculous that one should laugh loud when hearing them. We even have leaders who tell us NOT to follow what we hear from Imam's own mouth, to wait that they approve and edit and correct what our Imam told to us in person. I laugh at those stupid people.

Imam is absolute, he is self sufficient. He is the Dasmu Avatar.

People who give priority to announcements over Farmans should find themselves some other religion, or create their own but not in this Forum.


You wrote: "Imam is absolute, he is self sufficient. He is the Dasmu Avatar".
The discussion is about fasting and you came up with with Dasmu Avtar!! The article was sent to all jamiats from ITREB and ITREB works under guidance from Hazar Imam.
The article was not an announcement but was on the importance of fasting in the month of Ramadan. If you do not want to fast, it is fine but do not discourage others not to fast.
An innocent question; The Ismailis of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazikistan, Syrian Ismailis, Chinese Ismailis and thousands who belong to khoja community they do fast in the month of Ramadan. Are they infidels? Are they disobeying Imam, or is there religion different than other followers of Imam, or are they from some other planet?
You keep laughing it is good for your health. Laughing is a good medicine, be happy, there is only one life to live.
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Admin



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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

People have been diverted from the Ismaili faith by following announcements. Ismaili fasting has nothing to do with 30 days fasting it has to do with 365 days fasting, batini fasting so nicely defined by Pir Shams..

People who followed announcements from the institutions of that time also followed Musteali instead of Mowlana Nizar. As I said many of these announcements are useless and some times even prepared by useless people who have no clues on what is exactly the Ismaili faith.

Announcements encouraging Shariati interpretations are from these categories, mostly composed by people who do not know that our Imam said one road leads to Namaz and Roza and the other leads to freedom and these two will never meet.

I will not say here what Aga Ali Shah said in his Farmans about Shariati Rozas in his time, it will hurt feelings of many who have already converted to shariatism.... And in any case Farmans are not for that category of people.
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Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 5906

PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shivaathervedi wrote:

An innocent question; The Ismailis of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazikistan, Syrian Ismailis, Chinese Ismailis and thousands who belong to khoja community they do fast in the month of Ramadan. Are they infidels?


I was in Syria where Sunnis of Hama travel 30 km to Salamieh to eat lunch there during your "Ramadhan". Are you saying people in Salamieh are kafirs? What Chinese Ismailis do you know who fast? Please do not just trow names of countries, we can do same.

I have requested you not to take part in theological discussion. Please stick to subject which you are more comfortable with.

Truly Mowlana Sultan Muhammad Shah was right to say the those who are engrossed in Shariah will never understand his Farmans.
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Admin



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2018 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DAWN English Newspaper
Eating in public in Ramazan (1)

From the Newspaper, May 18, 2018
Facebook Count 478
Twitter Share

Some 30% of our population is under the age of 12, and is not obligated to fast. At any given point in time, one in four women cannot fast because of their monthly cycle.

The ill, the old and travellers are not obligated to fast. There are also 4.5% of people who are over the age of 65. And let’s add one per cent for the ill, and one per cent for travellers. The minorities make up another 3.6% of our population.

So, on any given day of Ramazan, there are approximately 50% people in Pakistan who cannot or are not obligated to fast. These are mainly people for whom fasting will be a hardship; that is why they are not obligated or in some cases even forbidden to fast.

How can a law be passed that makes it illegal for almost 50% of the population to eat in public, a right given to them by Islam? Even the Quran and Hadith do not forbid them from eating in public.

They are not obligated to fast and hence they have not been forbidden by Islam to eat in public or private. Anyone who is too ill to fast is obligated by Islam to break their fast before they do their body and life harm. That moment can be in public or private, based on how God willed it. Who are we as humans to take away the rights that God has given?

We Pakistanis have made a law that is contrary to the Holy Quran and the Hadith and tarnishes the name of Islam.

Nida. R. Farid
Karachi
Published in Dawn, May 18th, 2018


=================================================================

Reconciling Faith and Modernity for Ramadan (2)
By Mustafa Akyol
Contributing Opinion Writer
New York Times. May 14, 2018
This year, the Muslim holy month of Ramadan begins on Tuesday. That means a big portion of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims, my coreligionists, will be fasting for 30 days, which is really no easy task. Every day, from dawn till dusk, they will neither eat any food nor drink a drop of water. They will be hungry and thirsty but will wait patiently between the pre-dawn sahur meal and the iftar dinner at night — just for the sake of God. It is a great experience of self-discipline, devotion and piety. It is also a good opportunity, Islamic scholars often say, for reflecting about and developing empathy with those who starve because they are destitute.

For some of the world’s most far-flung Muslims, Ramadan will be even more difficult. These are the Muslims who live in the high latitudes, where “dawn till dusk” can equal almost the entire 24-hour day. In Reykjavik, Iceland, for example, which is now home to nearly 1,000 Muslims, the sun will set at midnight, only to come back in about two hours. That means the fasting time will be as long as 22 hours, allowing for only one meal a day.

No wonder this challenge has become a major point of discussion among Muslim scholars in the past few decades, particularly as increasing numbers of Muslims have migrated to northern countries like Norway and Sweden. Were the believers among these migrants supposed to follow the traditional Quranic timetable? Or could there be some gracious adjustment?

Answers varied. Saudi scholars, who typically represent the most literal and strict interpretation of Sunni Islam, ruled that no adjustment should be made. In a fatwa, or religious ruling, they declared that Islamic law is “universal and applies to all people in all countries.” Perhaps they could not empathize enough with their northern co-religionists, accustomed as the Saudis are to the mild fasting times in the Arabian Peninsula, where days are pretty standard in length throughout the year and fasting never exceeds 15 hours. Muslims nearer to the North Pole, accordingly, would just have to deal with their bad luck.

Fortunately, other Sunni jurists, such as those at Al-Azhar University in Egypt, have been a bit more amenable. Two compromises have been offered: Muslims in extremely high latitudes could ignore the natural day in their location and follow the timetables in Mecca or the nearest Muslim-majority country. This has allowed some Icelandic Muslims, for example, to follow the time in Turkey and fast for 18 hours instead of 22, allowing for a breakfast and a dinner during the waxing and waning hours of daylight.

This practical solution to a problem of jurisprudence must be welcome in the high latitudes. But it also raises a more complex, two-part theoretical question that is often ignored by Islam’s jurists but that deserves to be probed because it’s at the tip of a theological iceberg: How historical is the Quran’s language? And how literally should it be interpreted today?

This is a question raised by modern Muslim theologians like Fazlur Rahman Malik, who died in 1988; his reformist ideas led to his exile from his home country, Pakistan, and then to a safe haven at the University of Chicago. Like every Muslim worthy of the name, Dr. Rahman believed that the Quran is the word of God revealed to the Prophet Muhammad.

Yet, in Dr. Rahman’s opinion, God had not spoken in a vacuum. He had instead spoken to a specific community, the Arabs, and at a specific time, the early seventh century. This context, Dr. Rahman argued, played a role in the composition of the Quran’s text. And when new contexts arose, the injunctions of the Quran had to be reinterpreted in the light of the moral intentions behind the text.

The discussion over fasting is, in fact, a minor case of the need for such reinterpretations. Some more important issues include corporal punishments, which create some of the most controversial perceptions of Islam in the modern world. The Quran, in fact, is free of some of the harsh corporal punishments commonly associated with Islamic law — such as stoning of adulterers — but it does include others. “As for the thieves,” it decrees, “amputate their hands in recompense for what they committed.”

The Saudis take that Quranic injunction literally and carry it out without any doubt. So do the Iranians and the Sudanese. They see it is a commandment from God that must be obeyed as is. Yet there is also a contextual way of understanding God’s commandments. As explained by another proponent of reform within Islam, the Moroccan scholar Mohammed Abed al-Jabri, who died in 2010, there were simply no prisons in early-seventh-century Arabia, where the Quran was revealed. There was no state bureaucracy to run jails in a society that lived in tents and huts, so detaining and feeding someone within strong walls was neither possible nor feasible. As a result, all punishments had to be immediate, and corporal.

No wonder pre-Islamic Arabs also punished theft with the amputation of hands, as we learn from
Islamic literature itself; the Quran simply affirmed this tradition. Therefore, in Dr. Jabri’s view, the Quran’s verdict on theft was that it is a crime that should be punished by available means. Today, these means can be fines or prison sentences — a step forward that the Ottoman Empire, the very seat of the caliphate, had already taken in its Penal Code of 1858, which was influenced by French legal norms.

Conservative Muslims may find this interpretive take on the Quran too permissive. But even they do not take literally the Quran’s call to build self-defense by raising “war horses.” Instead, the call is interpreted to mean that the mounts are a reference to vehicles. And while the Saudi clerics may insist on taking the Quran literally on fasting for 22 hours from dawn till dusk, a future Muslim colony right at the North Pole, which gets only darkness at the winter solstice and only daylight at the arrival of summer — or, more radically, on Mars would force even them to change their minds. The heart of the matter is that Islam is facing a challenge that Jews and Christians have also faced in the past few centuries: There are new realities in the world, and we should figure out how much of our religious tradition is meant to be preserved as it was at its genesis. It is easy to say that God has already given us all the answers. But it may be more prudent to say that he also gave us the reason to think, rethink and reinterpret the meaning of his words.

Mustafa Akyol, a contributing opinion writer, is the author, most recently, of “The Islamic Jesus.”





ISIS's Perverse, Bloody Interpretation of Ramadan (3)
By: Amarnath Amarasingam & Charlie Winter
ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria)
“What of the person who spends the sacred month ... oppressing people and killing innocents?”
For the overwhelming majority of Muslims, Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, is a time of prayer and atonement. In addition to fasting for its duration and praying five times per day (as normal), many Muslims add special readings from the Koran to their daily worship, so that, by the end of the holy month—which, this year, begins today and ends on June 24—the text has been read in its entirety.
Sadly, in recent years, Ramadan has been marred by increased terrorist violence around the world, as the Islamic State has attempted to transform it into a month of unparalleled bloodshed. To some extent, it appears that its supporters are willing to help it do so.


On June 23, 2015, six days into Ramadan, then-ISIS spokesman Abu Muhammad al-Adnani called for attacks to commemorate the holy month. Three days later, a Shia mosque in Kuwait was hit by an ISIS suicide bomb that killed 26 Muslim worshippers. Later that same day, a tourist resort near the city of Sousse in Tunisia came under fire, with the attacker killing 38 people and injuring dozens more. On May 21, 2016, about two weeks before the start of Ramadan, Adnani made another speech. “Get prepared, be ready,” he said, “to make it a month of calamity everywhere for nonbelievers.” He argued that the targeting of civilians in the West was not only permissible, but desirable, and that as long as coalition forces were at war with ISIS there were no “innocents.”

Ramadan in 2016 proved to be particularly deadly. On June 12, U.S. citizen Omar Mateen opened fire in a nightclub in Orlando, killing 49 people. On June 27, eight suspected ISIS suicide bombers launched several waves of attacks on a Christian village in northeast Lebanon. A day later, more than 40 people were killed during an attack on Ataturk airport in Turkey. Three days later, more than 20 people were brutally killed at a café in Bangladesh. The next day, almost 300 people died when a large truck bomb exploded in Baghdad. As Ramadan came to a close on July 4, four suicide attacks hit three locations across Saudi Arabia, including one in the holy city of Medina.
While it is impossible to know whether any of these attackers had Ramadan on their minds, it now seems undeniable that jihadist groups regard the occasion, seen by most Muslims as a time of spiritual reflection, as a time of enhanced militancy. “Ramadan is the holy month of jihad,” one ISIS supporter told us over Twitter. “People want to win the honor of attaining martyrdom in Ramadan.” After all, Ramadan is a month in which all good deeds are rewarded manifold; for jihadists, such “good deeds” include terrorist attacks.

To validate this position, jihadists often evoke the Battle of Badr, a key moment in early Muslim history that occurred during the month of Ramadan in the year 624 CE. During the battle, Muslim forces overwhelmed their enemies despite being massively outnumbered. Against all odds, their victory ensured the survival of the fledgling community of believers. It’s no surprise that jihadists like to draw attention to this example, manipulating it to their political ends.

“What they are doing is not jihad in any sense according to Islamic tradition,” Abu Ali, a former extremist who has renounced his past views, pointed out. “I would counter by saying that just as one receives multiplied rewards for good deeds in Ramadan, they receive multiplied bad deeds for sins. So what of the person who spends the sacred month of Ramadan oppressing people and killing innocents?”

With the attack in Manchester, which ISIS claimed the next day, and the brutal killing Coptic Christians in Egypt, which ISIS has now claimed credit for, terrorism researchers and law-enforcement officials worry that this year’s Ramadan could once again see a flurry of attacks. Compounding these fears, a day before Ramadan began, ISIS supporters released a 12-minute statement in Arabic reiterating the words of their current spokesman, Abul Hasan al-Muhajir. In it, Abul Hasan could again be heard calling for attacks and repeating that civilians in the West are legitimate targets.

As abhorrent as this rhetoric is, it contains a sort of strategic logic. While it may be true that ISIS encourages the murder of civilians—killing “crusader” non-combatants is framed as the ultimate act of retribution—it would be wrong to think the organization considers such violence an end in itself.
With the leadership of ISIS slowly being snuffed out, and the campaigns against it in Mosul and around Raqqa gaining ground, the group is guaranteed to try to showcase its strength in the weeks and months to come—to show it is still as strong as ever. For ISIS, “inspired” and “directed” attacks (and anything in between) are the best way to do this. These operations are communicative acts and information weapons with which to buoy supporters’ morale and offset the ideological damage brought about by territorial loss and depleted leadership.

For ISIS, attacks like the one in Manchester aren’t just about gratuitous violence dressed up as Islam. They are image-management tools, ways to reset global perceptions and boost the hopes of the true believers fighting on the front lines in Iraq and Syria. It used to be that this triumphalist effect could be achieved through slick execution videos intended to terrorize the international community. Increasingly, though, encouraging attacks outside of the self-proclaimed caliphate heartlands is its chief means of resetting the global media agenda.

Besides that, inspiring such attacks is also a way to pit communities against each other, inflame anti-Muslim sentiment, and sow discord among Muslim communities and with the wider society. As Abul Hasan himself noted: “Make them forget sleep, terrorize them so that the neighbor fears his neighbor.”

For most Muslims, ramped-up attacks during Ramadan are perhaps the clearest evidence that organizations like ISIS are un-Islamic and pervert the core message of their faith. For ISIS fighters and supporters, though, the perception is that engaging in jihad during this holy month results in heightened rewards in the afterlife.
Atlanic Daily, Washington
26th May, 2017



Ramadan fasting: Modern opposition to age-old rules (4)
By: Tehmina Kazi

Tuesday 16 June 2015 19:21 BST (INDY/LIFE NEWSLETTER, UK)
It's that time of year again. Gentle squabbles over moon sightings, the stockpiling of frozen samosas, and the dreaded "Ramadan breath", which means we have to keep a miswak teeth-cleaning stick (or, more likely, a toothbrush) on us at all times. For tomorrow is the start of Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar.

This kicks off four weeks of introspection (maybe), God-consciousness (hopefully) and abstinence from food, water, smoking and marital sex (you're having a laugh, aren't you?) during daylight hours. The only exemptions from fasting are for older people or those with medical conditions, as well as children (who may fast if they wish to). Further, menstruating women can expect a break during their time of the month.
Faced with the intricacies and possible etiquette blips of these rituals in a country where non-Muslims are in the majority, you'd think advice from a compassionate and highly intelligent scholar would be lapped up. However, over the past few days, my Facebook feed has been heaving with high-handed dismissals of Dr Usama Hasan's excellent juristic opinion, or fatwa, on the reduction of fasting hours. He reasons that summertime fasts in northern Europe are far longer than they were possibly intended to be, with the worshipper receiving only five hours of eating and drinking time in one 24-hour period. After going through the religious precedents in detail, he encourages people who want to keep these long fasts to continue, but states that it is acceptable for others to keep 12- or 16-hour fasts if that is more comfortable for them.

The original principle of the fast (empathy with the poor, charity, service to humanity) is maintained, but it is fused with common sense and an awareness of practical considerations. This goes a step further than the usual dispensations for Muslims whose health is affected, and has ruffled a lot of feathers. Social-media blatherers wrongly accused Dr Hasan of instituting 12-hour fasts for all British Muslims, and tried to make out that he was subordinating God's will to the "desires" of human beings, failing to see that one of the highest virtues is actually reason.

The issue of fasting becomes even more politicised when children are concerned. Even under orthodox interpretations of Islamic law, as mentioned above, fasting is not obligatory for those who have not entered puberty. This doesn't stop some parents and children going ahead with the practice in school hours, however.

One primary-school trust grew so concerned about children fainting, becoming ill or missing out on parts of the curriculum, that it banned fasting this month. Justin James, the chief executive of the Lion Academy Trust, which covers a number of schools in east London, cited the delicate balancing act of the school's obligations under child-protection law versus working with the local communities it serves. It is a balance that my organisation, British Muslims for Secular Democracy, knows only too well. We recently received funding to revise and update our advice for schools, which helps teachers to negotiate these thorny issues, establish open channels of communication with parents, and find the best outcome for everyone concerned.

In many Muslim communities, there is a knee-jerk negative reaction to anything progressive or sensible, with certain people assuming that these measures automatically "water down" the faith. This is borne of an insecurity which deems the most severe version of a religion to be the most "authentic", and means that dissenting voices end up feeling isolated and unheard. A friend was recently looking to interview some non-fasting Muslims in Yorkshire. Hardly anyone answered her call, and her original request was met with snorts of derision on Facebook.

Contrary to what the snorters may think, their actions represent a departure from the spirit of this month, where people are supposed to work on their own spirituality and actions. Some of my best Ramadan memories involve dishing out fried chicken to homeless people at Lincoln's Inn (with Muslims and non-Muslims), and having the accompanying dhal and bananas handed right back with a cheeky grin. It would be great to see more of these events emblazoned on to the public consciousness, rather than toy-throwing defensiveness and exceptionalism.

Tehmina Kazi is the director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy
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swamidada



Joined: 18 Nov 2018
Posts: 240

PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dawn News Television
'I can never forget the fasting experience in space'
Web Desk 05 May 201

Ramadan is going to begin in the month, but will you believe at least one person in the world who fasted in space outside the earth.

Yes, in 1985, the first Arab astronomer Prince Sultan bin Salman fasted in the 1405 AH Ramadan during the trip to the US Space Shuttle Discovery.

Shortly before interviewing Arab News, Prince Sultan told about his impression.

He said that during his unforgettable space trip, he finished the Quran in 6 days, and for that he had allotted his golden time.

He was on a daily journey on the 29th fast, and he declared fasting as an unforgettable experience in space.

He said that Ramadan had come in hot weather this year, while I was taking special training for this trip in the Houston center in Houston, during the training, we were with severe heat and thirsty condition, There was a schedule for 24 Ramadan, but went on to Tawawa for the 29th fast.

During this training, he remained fasting and the doctors of NASA analyzed the effects of fasting on their health.

He fasted on the 29th fast with his team on the space shuttle, while consulting Saudi scholar Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Baz regarding the fasting times in space.

Saudi princes say, 'The religious scholar told me that I should do Sahar and Aftar according to the time where I was fasting on fasting, I did my journey from Florida.'

He spit in the time of sunrise sunset in the US state, whereas he heard in radio that the next day in Saudi Arabia is Eid.

However, he saw in the space that the new moon did not see him, but on the next day he saw the new moon and informed the Saudi scientist team.

After this, the Saudi authorities have confirmed that Ramadan has remained a day and he has to pay a penalty.

During this space trip, during prayers, according to the hours of the earth, while wet napkins used for Wudoo because there was no gravity.

/translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=ur&tl=en&text=Dawn%20News%20Television%20%0A'
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PostPosted: Wed May 22, 2019 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Arab states waste heaps of food during Ramadan

Hotels and restaurants have come up with some novel solutions


AS MUSLIMS HAVE for centuries, Ahmed Toufiq broke his Ramadan fast by nibbling a date while the call to prayer echoed across the Nile. Then he turned to the heaping plates in front of him. He made short work of a fragrant lentil soup, but his pace slowed as he picked through salads and scooped dips with steaming pita bread. When he walked outside for a cigarette 20 minutes after sunset, a server collected half a plate of untouched kebab and rice. “Before iftar, you feel like you want to eat for two,” he said.

Arab states waste a lot of food. A study in 2016 by the Economist Intelligence Unit, our sister company, found that Saudi Arabia bins 427kg per person annually, triple the average in Europe and North America. Some may chalk this up to traditions of hospitality: even a “light lunch” in Cairo or Beirut leaves guests in a torpor. The reasons are more varied, though. Half of the fruits and vegetables grown in Egypt are never eaten because they are often moved to market in open-air trucks and wilt quickly in the heat.

The problem gets worse during Ramadan. Residents of the United Arab Emirates each produce an extra 1.8kg of waste per day in the holy month, a 67% increase. Food accounts for 55% of Dubai’s trash, up from 22% in other months. Bahrain’s food waste increases by half to 600 tonnes daily. Buffets are a major culprit, especially in the Gulf, where hotels and restaurants often serve through the night. A study by researchers at Masdar, a state-owned renewable-energy firm in Abu Dhabi, found that just 53% of food at iftar buffets is eaten.

This is an expensive waste. Some governments see it as a security risk, too. The region is a net food importer. In the weeks before Ramadan, state-run media admonish their citizens to be less wasteful. On social media diners now swap recommendations not on lavish buffets but on a la carte options. Autocratic regimes that frown on civil society are happy for their citizens to take up the cause of food waste. Wahab, a Qatari start-up, sends volunteers to collect leftovers from hotels and restaurants.

A few hotels in Dubai have installed cameras and scales to track what winds up in the bin. Chefs use the data to cook less of unpopular dishes. One Hilton property says the system cut buffet waste by 70%. Others are doing away with the buffet altogether—if not for iftar then for suhour, the pre-dawn “dinner”. A growing number of restaurants advertise prix fixe menus as a waste-free way to break fasts. As an added perk, in an emirate struggling with an economic slump, these meals are cheaper. A lavish hotel buffet might set customers back 200 dirhams ($54). Set menus cost about half that.

Egypt’s national food bank feeds about 1.8m families during Ramadan. Some of the food is sourced from hotels that package leftovers from their buffet trays. For health reasons, though, uneaten food from a customer’s plate must be thrown away. After 15 hours of fasting eyes are bigger than stomachs. High-tech cameras will not help. So one Cairo hotel found a low-tech solution for its buffet: it made the plates smaller.

https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2019/05/21/arab-states-waste-heaps-of-food-during-ramadan?cid1=cust/dailypicks/n/bl/n/20190522n/owned/n/n/dailypicks/n/n/na/243928/n
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