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Parenting Issues

 
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:58 pm    Post subject: Parenting Issues Reply with quote

How do you raise a genius? Researchers say they’ve found the secret to successful parenting

Albert Einstein didn’t speak until he was three, but by age 12, he was already studying calculus. So it comes as no surprise that he would go on to revolutionize the world of science. Yet the question still remains: How did he become such a genius?

For years, researchers have been trying to find the answer. A 1999 study in the Lancet that analyzed 14 photographs of Einstein’s brain found that one brain region was completely absent, allowing his parietal lobe (which holds several areas that are important in language processing) to take up more space. Other studies of his brain found that it was larger than most others.

But in a new book, “The Formula: Unlocking the Secrets to Raising Highly Successful Children,” award-winning journalist Tatsha Robertson and Harvard economist Ronald F. Ferguson explore the how parents of successful children contributed to their achievements and the actionable insights we can glean about their child-rearing.

The ‘Formula’ for successful parenting

Over the course of 15 years, Robertson and Ferguson analyzed 200 high-achieving adults and their parents. They also studied the childhoods of well-known figures, from Anne, Susan and Janet Wojcicki (who have been called the “Silicon Valley sisters”) to Albert Einstein.

In the research, a clear pattern emerged: “The approaches that parents of high achievers adopted, beginning in the earliest years of life, bore real and striking similarities, despite those parents’ widely divergent backgrounds and life circumstances.

That pattern, which Robertson and Ferguson call the “Formula,” consists of eight roles: The Early Learning Partner, the Flight Engineer, the Fixer, the Revealer, the Philosopher, the Model, the Negotiator and the GPS Navigational Voice.

Einstein’s parents, Pauline and Hermann, were very supportive in all eight roles, Robertson tells CNBC Make It, but they were particularly skilled at being Negotiators and Revealers.

More...
https://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/special-report/2019/03/18/how-do-you-raise-a-genius-researchers-say-theyve-found-the-secret-to-successful-parenting/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2019 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Parenting in the Time of Measles

As many as half of the home-schooled kids I encounter are not vaccinated.


Excerpt:

But if vaccines are so important to my family, I’ve come to ask myself how intellectually honest it is for me to turn a blind eye and continue to allow my kids to socialize with families who are putting us all at risk.

That’s the problem with vaccine refusal: It is not an individual choice. It is a choice that endangers everyone, especially those too young or sick to be vaccinated.

Right now, the only solution to the anti-vaccine public health crisis on a legislative level is to eliminate nonmedical exemptions for children entering school, and it is a policy that should be instituted and tightened in every state, as it is in California. This is an important step that states need to take, but it is only part of the solution as more and more families opt out of the system.

Thankfully, government intervention isn’t the only tool we have to address this crisis. Pediatricians should refuse to treat patients who refuse to vaccinate, leaving parents who would expose a waiting room to the measles with a choice: Do I vaccinate to make sure my child can be also treated for normal childhood ailments like ear infections and strep throat? One should not come without the other, not when other patients are put at unnecessary risk.

More....

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/03/opinion/parenting-vaccines-measles.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ty_20190404&nl=opinion-today&nl_art=13&nlid=45305309emc%3Dedit_ty_20190404&ref=headline&te=1
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hospital in this East African country opens human milk bank, a first for the nation

When breastfeeding is not an option, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends donated human milk as a lifesaving alternative, and evidence paints a very strong picture in favour of donated human milk over infant formula.

Excerpt:

What is a milk bank and how does it work?

Human milk banks are facilities that systematically collect, pasteurise, test, store, and distribute donated breast milk.

An effective system has many operational processes to ensure it provides safe, high quality donor milk. They start with screening and recruiting donors who must be healthy mothers with surplus milk beyond the needs of their own child’s. Donors must undergo health checks including tests that screen for HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C. Diseases could be passed to children through breastmilk.

Donors must then express milk in hygienic conditions, after which the milk is pasteurised. This involves heating the milk in a water bath at 62.5°c for 30 minutes followed by rapid cooling.

At the bank, the milk is frozen and stored at -20c. When needed, it’s thawed to room temperature and issued to children who don’t have access to their own mothers’ milk. A prescription by a qualified health professional is needed for this.

Why are they needed?

Although breastfeeding is the most natural and best way to feed infants, many babies may lack access to their mother’s milk. This could’ve happened for many reasons – maybe the mother is sick, hasn’t got enough breast milk or is dead.

From our formative research, 44% of newborns in urban health facilities were separated from their mothers for varying periods of time. This ranged from less than an hour to more than 6 hours and even days after birth. Of these infants, only 14% were fed on mother’s own milk during separation. 36% of the newborns weren’t fed on anything during this period and an additional 23% were fed on formula or cow’s milk.

When breastfeeding is not an option, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends donated human milk as a lifesaving alternative. Particularly for babies that were born early, have low birth weight, are orphaned, malnourished or are severely ill.

More...
https://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/east-africa/2019/04/17/hospital-in-this-east-african-country-opens-human-milk-bank-a-first-for-the-country/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Data All Guilt-Ridden Parents Need

What science tells us about breast-feeding, sleep training and the other agonizing decisions of parenthood.


Excerpt:

These decisions — breast-feeding, sleep training, working — are just three of many that will come up in the first year of a child’s life. More await, from co-sleeping to screen time and more.

One day, your child will have a temper tantrum. How on earth do you deal with that? Exorcism? And what about potty training? You may find your child is one of a surprisingly large share (about 1 in 5) who refuse to poop in the toilet (it has a name: “stool toileting refusal”). In your pre-child life, you probably never thought about the question of how to encourage someone to poop in a particular location. But there you are, needing to find your way.

That lady on the internet comment board wants to tell you what to do, but she doesn’t live in your house, and she cannot know what is right for your family.

I’m not trying to give advice. I’m just arguing that in many cases the data can be helpful. But if the data falls short and you still want advice, let me pass along something our pediatrician once told me. It was our 2-year-old’s checkup, and I had my usual list of neuroses.

“We are going on this vacation, and there are bees,” I said. “It’s kind of isolated. What if Penelope is stung? She’s never been stung before. What if she’s allergic? How will I get her to a doctor in time? Should I bring something to be prepared for this? Should we test her in advance? Do I need an EpiPen?”

In other words, I had built up this elaborate and incredibly unlikely scenario in my head. I needed someone to remind me that yes, this could happen. But so could a million other things. Parenting is not actually about planning for every possible disaster.

The doctor paused. And then she said, very calmly:

“Hmm. I’d probably just try not to think about that.”

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/19/opinion/sunday/baby-breastfeeding-sleep-training.html?algo=random&cmpid=73&module=newsletter-opinion&nl=personalization&nlid=45305309&rank=0&recid=1K5wNicG3MoFcNZgLTIH6TZgWQd
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A workshop for parents on understanding the impact of childhood abuse and trauma on parenting, including supportive tools and resources.

You thought you were “over it” — those terrible things happened a long time ago. Maybe you’ve been to therapy or maybe enough time has gone by and your past feels long gone. Then you have children and begin reliving your childhood trauma through flashbacks, panic attacks and other post-traumatic stress symptoms. You are not alone in what you are struggling with and healing is possible.

This workshop will focus on understanding the impact of childhood abuse and trauma on parenting, including what steps we can take to heal ourselves while raising our children. We will cover the Adverse Childhood Experiences study and teach about the neuroscience of trauma. You will leave with some simple tools you can use for self-regulation and a list of resources to help you build your circle of support.

Participants will gain an understanding of:

how early childhood trauma affects mental, emotional, and physical health throughout the lifespan
common triggers for parenting survivors
common reactions and symptoms experienced by parenting survivors
the role self and co-regulation play in recalibrating the body’s stress response system
About the Presenter: Joyelle Brandt

Joyelle Brandt is a Self-Care Coach for moms. She specializes in working with mothers who are survivors of abuse – helping them develop a personalized self soothing toolkit for stress management. As a speaker, mothering coach, and multi-media creator, Joyelle works to dismantle the stigma that keeps childhood abuse survivors stuck in shame and self-hatred. She is the author/illustrator of Princess Monsters from A to Z and co-editor of Parenting with PTSD, the groundbreaking anthology that breaks the silence about the long-term impact of childhood trauma so that parents can break the cycle of abuse. When she is not busy raising two rambunctious boys, she is most often found playing her guitar or covered in paint at her art desk. You can keep up with Joyelle at www.joyellebrandt.com.

http://breathingspacecounselling.ca/events/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Parwaaz - a parental education programme

Parwaaz is a first of its kind parental education programme in Pakistan which is introduced to Jamat based on Mawlana Hazar Imam’s guidance on Early Childhood Development (ECD).

The programme design builds upon the existing positive parental practices while introducing culturally and socially grounded new knowledge and skills for the parents and families of children aged six months to three years.

Parwaaz integrates various aspects of ECD including Health, Nutrition, Play, Cognitive Stimulation and Religious perspectives. These themes are woven throughout the programme which is divided into 13 sessions that are usually conducted in informal settings (such as Jamatkhanas) by volunteers trained for the purpose. Each session comprises of a variety of parent - child and child only activities including playing, singing, praying, reading together etc. that not only strengthens the parent-child bond but also influences children’s social, cognitive, emotional and physical development.

Video at:

https://the.ismaili/pakistan/parwaaz-parental-education-programme
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advice from a dismal scientist to new parents

“Cribsheet” by Emily Oster offers an instructive look at decision-making


For new parents, it is a terrifying moment. The hospital doors close behind them, leaving them with a new and helpless human being. The baby’s survival into adulthood seems impossible. What if it will not eat? What if it is allergic to water? What if an owl carries it off? Probably, few parents wish at that moment for the help of an economist. But “Cribsheet”, a new book by Emily Oster of Brown University, shows that in the hectic haze of parenthood an economist’s perspective can prove surprisingly clarifying.

Ms Oster’s academic work relates to health and health policy. A recent paper, for example, studied how food-purchasing decisions change in response to being diagnosed with diabetes. Five years ago she published a book on pregnancy, drawing on her training as an economist and her own experience (her husband, Jesse Shapiro, with whom she has two children, is also an economist at Brown). “Cribsheet” tackles the next step in the journey from childfree person to parent. Deciding whether to have a child in the first place fairly obviously involves economic calculations, from the impact on the parents’ earning potential to the resources that must be set aside to pay for nappies, child care and university. The decisions that come in a torrent after the birth, in contrast, such as whether to breastfeed or how to manage sleeping arrangements, might not seem so amenable to such thinking. But Ms Oster’s new book shows that they are.

More...

https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2019/05/02/advice-from-a-dismal-scientist-to-new-parents
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2019 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How to End the Child-Care Crisis

A child’s first 1,000 days are a time to be seized.


Excerpt:

We know from breakthroughs in neuroscience that children’s brains are growing explosively during the first three years of life — developing more than one million neural connections a second. A child’s early brain architecture shapes all future learning and behavior. This is also the period in our lives when we are most vulnerable to trauma. Experiences like homelessness, forced family separation or exposure to violence inhibit a child’s ability to learn and form trusting relationships. By 24 months, many toddlers living in poverty show both behavioral and cognitive delays. Equally powerful, though, is the impact of an attuned parent or teacher who understands how to build loving, responsive relationships that can stimulate learning and repair the damage done by trauma.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/24/opinion/child-care-crisis.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_190525
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2019 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where a Miracle Substance Called Breast Milk Saves Lives

How breast-feeding transforms the lives of malnourished children in Guatemala and around the world.


CHICHALUM, Guatemala — Painted on the side of a health post in this rural town in Guatemala’s western highlands is a simple message: Breast-feeding is a lifelong gift.

But around the world, breast milk is a gift that many children are given incorrectly or not given at all — and the results are devastating. Health scholars report that a child dies more than once a minute somewhere in the world for lack of proper breast-feeding.

This isn’t the case in the United States, where debates about breast-feeding don’t normally involve child mortality. In rich countries where water is clean, a bottle is not lethal the way it sometimes is in poor countries.

In countries like this one, however, breast-feeding can make a vast difference. Consider Eva, a wide-eyed 14-month-old baby being treated for malnutrition at the Casa Jackson Hospital in Antigua, Guatemala.

Eva and her mother were homeless for the first three months of her life, says Rina Lazo Rodriguez, the director of the hospital, during which time Eva was fed soda or juice, braved the elements and faced unhygienic conditions.

Before being sent to Casa Jackson, Eva was hospitalized for pneumonia and diarrhea. Lazo Rodriguez attributes non-exclusive breast-feeding as one of the many factors that led to Eva’s malnourishment.

The lives of 823,000 children younger than five could be saved annually if we scaled up breast-feeding to near universal levels, according to estimates published in The Lancet breast-feeding series from 2016. Specifically, breast-feeding is linked with decreases in diarrhea, middle ear infections, and respiratory infections and increases in IQ and nutrition.

Babies don’t hog all the benefits of breast-feeding, either. The same analysis estimated that increasing the amount of time mothers breast-feed could prevent more than 22,000 breast cancer deaths each year. For mothers, some evidence also links breast-feeding to protection against ovarian cancer and type 2 diabetes.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/opinion/breast-feeding.html?em_pos=small&ref=headline&nl_art=14&te=1&nl=opinion-today&emc=edit_ty_20190606
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan Education Board Canada - Webinars

1. Back to School for Parents
2. What Do I Do About Bullying
3. Raising Generations of Healthy Kids
4. Use of Technology in Schools
5. Graduate Studies Funding Strategies- GRST Webinar Series
6. What Parents Need to Know about Substance use
7. Faith & Practice in Early Years

More...

https://the.ismaili/canada/aga-khan-education-board-canada-webinars
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sweden Finds a Simple Way to Improve New Mothers’ Health. It Involves Fathers.

The flexibility to have an extra person at home, even for a few days, offers significant postpartum benefits, new research shows.


The weeks after a mother gives birth are a universally vulnerable period. She is recovering physically and mentally, while dealing with sleep deprivation, round-the-clock caregiving and possibly breast-feeding. Yet after a day or a few days in the hospital, she often doesn’t see a doctor for six weeks.

A new study suggests a way to make a significant difference in mothers’ postpartum health: Give the other parent paid leave, and the flexibility to use it on days the mother needs extra support, even if it just means a couple of days at home.

The researchers, Maya Rossin-Slater and Petra Persson, economists at Stanford, studied the effects of a 2012 Swedish law that allows fathers to take up to 30 days, as needed, in the year after a birth, while the mother is still on leave. In the first six months postpartum, there was a 26 percent decrease in anti-anxiety prescriptions compared with mothers who gave birth just before the policy went into effect. There was a 14 percent reduction in hospitalizations or visits to a specialist, and an 11 percent decrease in antibiotic prescriptions.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/04/upshot/sweden-finds-a-simple-way-to-improve-new-mothers-health-it-involves-fathers.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_190614?campaign_id=2&instance_id=10197&segment_id=14287&user_id=b5e5426f5c89f06ac9cd19778d3e6de3&regi_id=453053090614
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18983

PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2019 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’ve Picked My Job Over My Kids

I love them beyond all reason. But sometimes my clients need me more.


I am a lawyer, a law professor and a writer. I am also a divorced mother of two young children. I’m often asked some version of: “How do you excel at work and be the best mother you can be?”

Every working mother gets this question, which presupposes that a “work-life balance” is achievable. It’s not. The term traps women in an endless cycle of shame and self-recrimination.

Like many women, I often prioritize my job. I do this because, as the head of a single-parent household, I’m the sole breadwinner. My ex-husband, who has joint custody, is an amazing father and my life would be impossible without him. Neither of us pays the other support.

My choice is more than a financial imperative. I prioritize my work because I’m ambitious and because I believe it’s important. If I didn’t write and teach and litigate, a part of me would feel empty.

In 2013, I was the trial lawyer on a case to free an innocent black man improbably named Kash Register. As a teenager in 1979, because of police and prosecutorial misconduct and witnesses who lied, he was condemned to serve life in prison for a murder he did not commit.

More...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/29/opinion/sunday/ive-picked-my-job-over-my-kids.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_190630?campaign_id=2&instance_id=10576&segment_id=14792&user_id=b5e5426f5c89f06ac9cd19778d3e6de3&regi_id=453053090630
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