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AFRICA
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Diaspora cash as capital for socioeconomic development

https://www.thecitizen.co.tz/oped/Diaspora-cash-as-capital-for-socioeconomic-development/1840568-4883304-1st8cx/index.html
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Angola’s go-to app for delivering live goats to your door

In Africa, the gig economy can benefit rich and poor alike


African cities are tasty markets for food-delivery apps. The continent has 21 of the world’s 30 fastest-growing urban areas, where an expanding middle class boasts smartphones and spare cash. These cities also have hideous traffic, so it’s a chore to drive a car to a restaurant. But delivery scooters can slalom through jams.

These were the ingredients that made possible the rise of several food-delivery startups in Africa. Jumia Food delivers meals to urban dwellers in 11 countries. In South Africa Mr D Food competes with Uber Eats, an offshoot of the American ride-hailing app. Tupuca has been bringing meals to residents of Angola’s capital, Luanda, since 2016.

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https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2018/12/06/angolas-go-to-app-for-delivering-live-goats-to-your-door?cid1=cust/ednew/n/bl/n/2018/12/6n/owned/n/n/nwl/n/n/na/173397/n
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The People of Mbomo Tell Their Stories

In “Congo Tales,” a new book about the second-largest tropical forest in the world, the story of a people and their home comes alive.


“Congo Tales,” a new book published recently by Prestel, began as a call to action to save the Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the heart of the Congo Basin, which is the second-largest tropical forest in the world after the Amazon, from the threats of climate change.

It soon became a book about the stories of the people who live there.

A team including Pieter Henket, a Dutch photographer; Eva Vonk, a Dutch producer; Steve Regis “Kovo” N’Sondé, a Congolese artist and philosopher; his brother Wilfried N’Sondé, a Congolese writer and musician; and a group of conservationists and researchers spent five years in the basin. There, they collected and translated the tales of the people of the Mbomo region. The stories were then edited by the N’Sondé brothers, a job suited to the pair who grew up with stories passed down from their grandmother.

“These stories, through the values and symbols they carry, are our legacy,” said Kovo N’Sondé. “When I say our, I don’t only mean Congolese citizens or Bantu peoples, I mean mankind. These stories are all about wisdom, knowledge, ethical and aesthetic principles.

Photos and more...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/01/books/congo-tales-mbomo-pieter-henket.html?emc=edit_th_181215&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053091215
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2018 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Morocco became Africa’s agricultural oasis

Just 6% of arable land in Africa is irrigated, Morocco can offer valuable insights to help other countries tap into this enormous potential to expand irrigation.


By Dr. Karim El Aynaoui, managing director of OCP Policy Center and member of the Malabo Montpellier Panel

With the rolling dunes of the Sahara desert overlapping its borders, Morocco may be an unlikely candidate to lead the region in water control and management.

Yet it is precisely these natural features and the challenge of water scarcity that prompted the country to invest heavily in irrigation to boost food production and withstand droughts.

Today,Morocco mobilises an estimated 22 billion cubic meters of water, and has equipped around 20 per cent of all its cultivated land for irrigation.

As a new report launched at the Malabo Montpellier Panel Forum in Rabat reveals just six per cent of arable land in Africa is irrigated, Morocco can offer valuable insights to help other countries tap into this enormous potential to expand irrigation.

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https://www.cnbcafrica.com/insights/energy-environment/2018/12/18/how-morocco-became-africas-agricultural-oasis/

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Nine of ten Africans unqualified for the Jobs they apply to

Research conducted by the ROAM (Ringier One Africa Media) Group shows that many Africans who apply for a job are not qualified in the first place.


Excerpt:

Clemens Weitz, CEO of ROAM elaborates on the potential for economic growth: “Our research clearly shows that the education of the African job market has a long way to go – both on the seeker and employer side. Solving this challenge will unlock tremendous latent economic potential. Imagine an efficient economy, where all employees sit in the job that is a perfect, natural fit for their individual nature. Productivity and satisfaction would skyrocket. AI and machine learning have tremendous potential, and we plan to fundamentally solve this challenge in 2019.”

https://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/special-report/2018/12/18/nine-of-ten-africans-unqualified-for-the-jobs-they-apply-to-2/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green technologies can generate growth and employment, here’s how African cities can utilize them

In 1967 one gigabyte of hard drive storage space cost US$ 1m. Today it’s around two US cents. Computer processing power has also increased exponentially: it doubles every two years. This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to technological progress in the 21st century.

There have also been tremendous advances in communication technology; robotics; nanotechnology; genetics and artificial intelligence, among other things. This merging of digital, physical and biological worlds has come to be known as the “fourth industrial revolution”.

So far, relatively little attention has been paid to the overwhelming potential of the fourth industrial revolution to catalyse much needed transitions to a more sustainable society – particularly in the developing world.

This is slowly starting to shift. The World Economic Forum recently published a set of briefs as part of its “Shaping the Future of Environment and Natural Resource Security System Initiative”. These documents have begun to address some key questions around the potential role of the fourth industrial revolution in supporting a sustainable development agenda.

There are many compelling reasons for combining the offerings of the fourth industrial revolution with new green technologies, infrastructures and systems to tackle the developing world’s challenges. Multiple benefits can be realised through introducing these offerings in new, innovative ways that are customised for local contexts.

These green technologies can generate employment, ease pressure on infrastructure in rapidly growing cities and lower energy costs, especially for poorer households.

More....

https://www.cnbcafrica.com/news/special-report/2018/12/19/green-technologies-can-generate-growth-and-employment-heres-how-african-cities-can-utilize-them/
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lagos, City of Hustle, Builds an Art ‘Ecosystem’

West Africa’s new art destination is a sprawling megacity with a generation of artists, gallerists and collectors powering the scene.


LAGOS, Nigeria — Cars snaked out from the hideous traffic and deposited the city’s elite, dressed to impress, at the Civic Center, a concrete-and-steel edifice fronting Lagos Lagoon. Women exuding Vogue beauty and power paused on the patio to give television interviews.

Art X Lagos was living up to its reputation as a happening. Not just collectors, but the hip, the curious, the Instagram crowd, thronged West Africa’s principal fair in November. They packed the venue to hear the keynote talk by the distinguished British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare, back for the occasion. The Ooni of Ife, a Yoruba king, showed up, escorted by praise-singers. Conversations carried over from gallery openings around town and from the Art Summit, a two-day convening, where the celebrated painter Kehinde Wiley, flown in by the United States consulate, was a special guest.

This enormous city — with no official census, population estimates range from 13 million to 21 million — is dynamic by disposition. Yes, the roads are clogged, political corruption is rampant, and the power cuts trigger armies of generators spewing noxious fumes. But Lagosians — who are proud of their “hustle,” a mix of effort, imagination, and brash optimism — will turn any challenge into enterprise. Commerce, music, fashion, have long thrived amid the chaos. And now, with its solid collector base and thickening web of galleries and alternative spaces, the art “ecosystem” — the word everyone uses — is achieving critical mass.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/08/arts/design/lagos-nigeria-art-x-art.html?emc=edit_th_190210&nl=todaysheadlines&nlid=453053090210
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 18074

PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Op-Ed: How African countries can ‘leapfrog’ the fossil-fuel based growth strategies of developed countries

This week, heads of African states are convening at the African Union Summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where they will discuss the African Union’s strategy for socio-economic development, known as Agenda 2063. This agenda casts a vision of inclusive growth and sustainability, in the face of the growing risk of climate change. It is true: rising global temperatures pose a serious challenge to the lives and livelihoods of Africans. But climate change also offers an unprecedented opportunity to steer our continent towards a more sustainable, inclusive and prosperous future.

More...

https://www.cnbcafrica.com/zdnl-mc/2019/02/11/op-ed-how-african-countries-can-leapfrog-the-fossil-fuel-based-growth-strategies-of-developed-countries/
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