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Aga Khan Award for Architecture 2013
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.rtp.pt/noticias/index.php?article=678346&tm=2&layout=121&visual=49

Escola de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade do Minho ganha prémio Internacional

Lusa 04 Set, 2013, 18:43

A Escola de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade do Minho ganhou o prémio International Recognition of Excellence in Medical Education, atribuído no 40.º Congresso Anual da Association for Medical Education in Europe, na categoria "Envolvimento dos Estudantes".

Em comunicado enviado hoje à agência Lusa, a Universidade do Minho (UMinho) aponta que "só" oito escolas médicas em todo o mundo foram destacadas naquela que foi a primeira edição do International Recognition of Excellence in Medical Education (ASPIRE).

Esta é uma distinção encarada como tendo "a maior relevância" para a Escola de Ciências da Saúde (ECS-UMInho) que instrui um curso de Medicina "inovador", com plano de estudos "centrado" no aluno e em interligação com a investigação.

"Candidatámo-nos dando provas de que os estudantes contribuem para a sua comunidade académica e que lhes é atribuído um papel ativo na sua formação e no ensino e aprendizagem", refere, no comunicado, o professor Manuel João Costa.

A distinção, atribuída na categoria "Envolvimento dos Estudantes", traduz o "reconhecimento" do curso de Medicina na instituição.

"O curso de Medicina da UMinho é inovador no país, orientando-se numa perspetiva integrada biopsicossocial e na linha das recomendações mundiais. O plano de estudos centra-se no aluno e em interligação com a investigação.

Entre os seus programas de pós-graduação destacam-se o primeiro programa nacional de doutoramento (MD/PhD) com as universidades de Columbia e Thomas Jefferson, EUA", explana a instituição.

Além disso, lembra o texto, "a ECS-UMinho é ainda a única escola médica portuguesa no programa de intercâmbio global de estudantes liderado pela Associação de Escolas Médicas Americanas e colabora em iniciativas internacionais de avaliação de conhecimentos clínicos de alunos de medicina".

O prémio, que teve em 2013 a primeira edição, foi entregue pela Association for Medical Education in Europe, a associação europeia da Federação Mundial de Educação Médica, que é "reconhecida pela sua atividade e dinamismo em prol da formação em medicina de qualidade".

Além da UMinho, foram galardoadas as universidades do Sul de Illinois (EUA), de Aga Khan (Paquistão), de Maribor (Eslovénia), da Austrália Ocidental (Austrália), do Norte de Ontário (Canadá), de Hull York (Reino Unido) e a Universidade Médica Internacional (Malásia).

TAGS:Aga Khan, Association Medical Education, Columbia Thomas Jefferson, Illinois, International Recognition Excellence, Médica, Ontário Canadá Hull York,
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://archrecord.construction.com/news/2013/09/130906-Aga-Kahn-Awards-Announced.asp

Aga Khan Awards Announced
September 6, 2013

Aga Khan Award 2013 Winner
Photo © AKAA / Marc Lins

Islamic Cemetery
Altach, Austria
Designed by Bernardo Bader Architects, the new cemetery serves the local Muslim community in industrialized western Austria, where the younger descendents of immigrants wanted a community burial place, rather than following the tradition of returning the dead to former homelands.

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture, given every three years, announced the latest winning projects at a press conference in Lisbon, where a ceremony celebrating the honors was to be held at the medieval Castle of St. George, overlooking the Portuguese capital. The prizes, which were first awarded in 1980, are intended to recognize design excellence and positive impact on communities that have a significant Muslim population. Both historic restoration and new construction are eligible for consideration. This year’s winners were selected from a short list of 20.

Under the guidance of the Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts, and Tourism Organisation of East Azerbaijan Province, the historic bazaar—a World Heritage site dating from the 10th century that includes 3.5 miles of covered marketplace—has been undergoing a long-term renovation. The project is the result of a unique arrangement between the local government and the tenants.

The winners will receive a total of $1 million in prize money, allocated by the nine-member jury. This year’s Master Jury included architects David Adjaye, Toshiko Mori, and Wang Shu, as well as Mahmood Mamdani, a professor of politics and culture at Columbia University in New York and Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Click on the photo above to view a slide show of the winning projects and read descriptions.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-06/iran-bazaar-sudan-clinic-win-1-million-aga-khan-award.html

BLOOMBERG

Iran Bazaar, Sudan Clinic Win $1 Million Aga Khan Award
By Farah Nayeri - Sep 6, 2013 12:00 PM ET

A heart clinic in Sudan, a bazaar in Iran, and an Islamic cemetery in Austria were three of the five winners of the 2013 Aga Khan Award for Architecture, worth a total of $1 million and announced in Lisbon today.

The jury praised “a responsible, efficient and inspiring model of health services in a society marred by war, internal conflict, and lack of basic needs like water and sanitation.”

The Award for Architecture, started in 1977 by the Aga Khan, is handed out every three years. It rewards projects of all sizes that are well designed and help boost quality of life. Winners aren’t always architects: They can be city authorities, clients, builders, engineers and master craftsmen.

Another winner was the restoration of the Bazaar in Tabriz, Iran. Dating back to the 10th century and added in 2010 to the World Heritage List, the Bazaar had started crumbling in recent years. The restoration has been funded both by the government and by the merchants working in the Bazaar.

The jury also recognized the Islamic Cemetery in Altach, Austria -- designed by Bernardo Bader -- for allowing the local Muslim community to bury their dead nearby rather than having to send them back to their country of origin.

The nine-member jury included architects David Adjaye and Wang Shu (founder of the Amateur Architecture Studio in Hangzhou, China).

The restoration of the historic center of Birzeit in the West Bank was another winner. That project was led by the Ramallah-based Riwaq architectural conservation center. Also recognized was the Rabat-Sale Urban Infrastructure Project in Morocco, led by Marc Mimram Architectes.

Muse highlights include New York and London weekend guides; Lewis Lapham on history; Jeremy Gerard on U.S. theater; and Greg Evans and Craig Seligman on movies.

To contact the writer of this story: Farah Nayeri in London at Farahn@bloomberg.net.

The Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery in Khartoum is a modern 63-bed hospital with three operating theaters, where staff members are housed in repurposed transport containers. The project was designed by Studio Tamassociati (based in Venice, Italy).

A detail of the brick vaults of the Bazaar in Tabriz, Iran, which dates back to the 10th century. The Bazaar's restoration project is one of the five winners of the 2013 Agha Khan Award for Architecture. Photographer: Amir Anoushfar/AKAA via Bloomberg

The Islamic cemetery designed by Bernardo Bader and commissioned by the town of Altach. The project is one of five to win the 2013 Agha Khan Award for Architecture. Photographer: Adolf Bereuter/AKAA via Bloomberg

The Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery in Khartoum, Sudan. Designed by Studio Tamassociati of Venice, Italy, the hospital is one of five winners of the 2013 Agha Khan Award for Architecture. Photographer: Raul Pantaleo/AKAA via Bloomberg

A viaduct leading to the bridge that connects Rabat, the Moroccan capital, to the suburb of Sale, is shown with the historic Hassan II tower in the background in Morocco. The Rabat-Sale urban infrastructure project is one of five winners of the 2013 Agha Khan Award for Architecture. Photographer: Cemal Emden/AKAA via Bloomberg


A before and after comparitive view of the Birzeit University guest house in the West Bank following the town's restoration by the Riwaq Center for Architectural Conservation in Ramallah, Palestine. The project is one of the five winners of the 2013 Aga Khan Architecture Award. Source: Riwaq Center for Architectural Conservation/AKAA via Bloomberg
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From AKDN.org

2013 Aga Khan Award for Architecture Recipients Announced

Lisbon, 6 September 2013 - His Excellency Aníbal Cavaco Silva, President of the Portuguese Republic, and His Highness the Aga Khan today presented the Aga Khan Awards for Architecture at the Castle of São Jorge in Lisbon.

The five winning projects are:

Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery, Khartoum, Sudan: The Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery, which consists of a hospital with 63 beds, serves over 50,000 patients per year, drawing from a catchment area in eastern Africa of over 300 million people. The welcoming architecture “provides an exemplary prototype for the region as well as for the field”, remarked the Master Jury in their citation. The Centre meets the high technical demands of a hospital with complex functions, including three operating theatres, while providing a number of eco-friendly solutions to common problems. Mixed modes of ventilation and natural light enable all spaces to be homely and intimate. In addition to solar panels and special insulation techniques, the architects have reused 90 six- metre (20-foot) containers that had been discarded after being used to transport construction materials for the Centre.

Revitalisation of Birzeit Historic Centre, Birzeit, Palestine: The five-year project, which will eventually encompass 50 villages, is part of a rehabilitation master plan initiated by the Riwaq Centre for Architectural Conservation. The project has transformed the decaying town of Birzeit, creating employment and reviving traditional crafts. The Master Jury remarked that the project brought together “stakeholders and local craftsmen into a process of healing that is not merely physical but that is social, economic and political”. By focusing on towns and villages in the area under Palestinian civil authority – where an estimated 50 percent of the surviving historic structures are located and where most Palestinians live – Riwaq realised that it could save much of the local heritage while at the same time having greatest significant socio-economic impact.

Rabat-Salé Urban Infrastructure Project, Morocco: Linking Rabat and Salé to form an urban hub, the project was born out of a new vision of large-scale regeneration, one in which improved transportation and mobility were to be priority components of the larger urban plan. The project combines exemplary bridge design, infrastructure improvement and urban planning. As a result, the Hassan II Bridge has become a new icon for Rabat-Salé, reinforcing a modern, progressive, twin-city identity. The Master Jury remarked that the project was “a sophisticated and cohesive model for future infrastructure projects, especially in places of rapid urbanisation”.

Rehabilitation of Tabriz Bazaar, Tabriz, Iran: With origins in the 10th century, the Tabriz Bazaar has long functioned as a main commercial centre for the city. But by the late 20th century, it had begun to deteriorate. To rehabilitate the structures, which cover 27 hectares and over 5.5 kilometres of covered bazaars, a management framework was established that involved the bazaar community, municipal authorities and the Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organisation (ICHTO). During the pilot restoration project, the government contributed 85 percent of the financial coverage and the bazaar community contributed 15 percent; in subsequent stages, the bazaar community – convinced of the value of the restoration – provided up to 90 percent of the funding. The Master Jury found that the project was “a remarkable example of stakeholder coordination and cooperation to restore and revitalise a unique structure”. Since 2000, numerous complexes within the bazaar have been rehabilitated, infrastructure has been improved and public facilities have been built.

Islamic Cemetery, Altach, Austria: Until recently, some Muslims in Austria would send their dead back to their countries of origin for burial. But the desire of Muslims to be buried in the countries of their birth led to the creation of a multi-faith, multi-ethnic group of actors, including local authorities and an NGO, to create a cemetery where funeral rites could be administered locally. The design was lauded by the Award’s Master Jury for the way it realised “the wish of an immigrant community seeking to create a space that fulfils their spiritual aspirations and, at the same time, responds to the context of their adopted country”. Inspired by garden design, it features roseate concrete walls, five staggered, rectangular gravesite enclosures, and a structure housing assembly and prayer rooms. The principal materials used were exposed reinforced concrete for the walls and oak wood for the ornamentation of the entrance facade and the interior of the prayer space.

(For a full on-line press kit including press releases on each of the winning projects, as well as high-resolution images and video, please see www.akdn.org/Aga_Khan_Award_2013, which will be password-protected until 6 September 2013.)

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture, which was established by His Highness the Aga Khan in 1977, is given every three years. It recognises all types of building projects that affect today’s built environment, from modest, small-scale projects to sizable complexes.

As this cycle’s recipients illustrate, the Award’s mandate is different from that of many other architecture prizes: it selects projects – from innovative mud and bamboo schools to state of the art “green” buildings – that not only exhibit architectural excellence but also improve the overall quality of life.

The US$ 1 million prize, which will be divided among the five recipients, does not necessarily go to the architect. The Award also identifies municipalities, builders, clients, master craftsmen and engineers who have played important roles in the realisation of a project. The Master Jury has the discretion to apportion the prize money however it sees fit.

Since the Award was launched 36 years ago, 110 projects have received the award and nearly 8000 building projects have been documented.
The 2013 Award Master Jury

The Awards are selected by an independent Master Jury appointed by the Steering Committee for each three-year Award cycle. The nine members of the Master Jury for the 2010-2013 Award cycle are:

Mr. David Adjaye, Principal, Adjaye Associates, London, United Kingdom
Dr. Howayda al-Harithy, Professor, Department of Architecture and Design, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
Mr. Michel Desvigne, Landscape Architect and Founder, Agence Michel Desvigne, Paris, France
Professor Mahmood Mamdani, Professor and Executive Director, Makerere Institute for Social Research (MISR), Wandegeya, Uganda
Mr. Kamil Merican, Principal Designer and CEO, Group Design Partnership, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Professor Toshiko Mori, Principal, Toshiko Mori Architect, New York City, USA
Ms. Shahzia Sikander, Artist, New York City, USA
Mr. Murat Tabanlıoğlu, Architect and Founder, Tabanlıoğlu Architects, Istanbul, Turkey
Mr. Wang Shu, Architect and Founder, Amateur Architecture Studio, Hangzhou, China

Full biographies of Master Jury members can be found online at: http://www.akdn.org/architecture/jury.asp
Steering Committee

The Award is governed by a Steering Committee chaired by His Highness the Aga Khan. The current members of the Steering Committee are:

His Highness the Aga Khan, Chairman
Mohammad al-Asad, Founder & chairman, Center for the Study of the Built Environment, Jordan
Homi K. Bhabha, Director of the Humanities Center, Harvard University, USA
Norman Foster, Founder and chairman, Foster + Partners, UK
Omar Abdulaziz Hallaj, Architect, Syria
Glenn Lowry, Director, Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA
Rahul Mehrotra, Principal, RMA Architects, India
Mohsen Mostafavi, Dean of the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, USA
Farshid Moussavi, Principal, Farshid Moussavi Architecture, UK
Han Tümertekin, Principal, Mimarlar Tasarim Danismanlik Ltd, Turkey

Farrokh Derakhshani is Director of the Award.

A monograph featuring the projects of the 2013 Aga Khan Award, entitled “Architecture is Life”, has been published by Lars Müller Publishers www.lars-mueller-publishers.com (September 2013).

For more information, please see the website www.akdn.org/architecture and on-line press kit www.akdn.org/Aga_Khan_Award_2013 (password protected until 6 September 2013) or contact:

Sam Pickens
Aga Khan Award for Architecture
PO Box 2049, 1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland
Telephone: (41 22) 909 72 30
E-mail: sam.pickens@akdn.org
Website: www.akdn.org/architecture
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan University and Catholic University of Portugal reaffirm cooperation


Rector of the Catholic University of Portugal Dr. Maria da Gloria Garcia and President of AKU Firoz Rasul sign the renewed Memorandum of Understanding between their two institutions as His Highness the Aga Khan, Chancellor of the Aga Khan University looks on. - Photo: AKDN / Gary Otte

Please also see more photographs on http://www.akdn.org/photos_show.asp?Sid=207

The Aga Khan University (AKU) and the Catholic University of Portugal (CUP) on Thursday agreed to renew and expand cooperation in a number of academic fields. Under a Memorandum of Understanding signed during a brief ceremony at the Ismaili Centre Lisbon, the two academic institutions agreed to foster knowledge creation and share learning and human capacity in a wide array of areas, including in cultural studies, education and research, early childhood development, comparative law and religion, nursing education and training.

His Highness the Aga Khan, who is Chancellor of the Aga Khan University, and the Roman Catholic Patriarch of Lisbon, Dom Manuel Clemente, presided over the ceremony. President of AKU Firoz Rasul and the Rector of CUP Dr. Maria da Gloria Garcia signed the renewed Memorandum of Understanding on behalf of their respective institutions.

Speaking at the ceremony, President Firoz Rasul said: "Through this relationship we can address shared concerns, identify common interests and foster greater understanding of the needs of the world today such as poverty alleviation, building of civil society, human development, pluralism and social inclusion." This was echoed by Dr Garcia who remarked, "what both our institutions aim to accomplish with the Memorandum we are going to sign encourages us to see beyond the present we are living here, in this room, with a smile of confidence and the ambition of always doing better."

Whilst in Portugal, His Highness the Aga Khan also met with a number of senior Portuguese government leaders including Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho and His Excellency President Anibal Cavaco Silva who hosted a lunch in honour of the Aga Khan at the Presidential Palace, before presenting the 2013 Aga Khan Awards for Architecture in the beautiful setting of Lisbon’s São Jorge Castle.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://sfaac-filatelia.blogspot.ca/2013/08/carimbo-de-1-dia-premio-aga-khan-para.html

Quinta-feira, 29 de Agosto de 2013



Carimbo de 1º dia: Prémio Aga Khan para a Arquitectura, 06-09-2013
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.presidencia.pt/?idc=10&idi=76366&idl=2

6 September 2013
12:25
The President of the Portugal receives, in audience, His Highness the Aga Khan, whom he later hosts at luncheon
20:15
The President of the Republic presides, jointly with His Highness the Aga Khan, at the award ceremony of the Aga Kahn Prize for Architecture
Location: Castle of St. George, Lisbon

















The President of the Republic received, in the Palace of Belém, the Aga Khan, who is visiting Portugal to attend the award ceremony of the Aga Khan Prize for Architecture.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.portugal.gov.pt/pt/fotos-e-videos/fotos/20130906-pm-aga-khan.aspx


2013-09-06 às 10:16 Aga Khan, 6 setembro 2012 Primeiro-Ministro Pedro Passos Coelho recebe Sua Alteza o Aga Khan, Lisboa, 6 setembro 2013 (Foto: Walter Branco)









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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.akdn.org/Content/1197

Speech by His Highness the Aga Khan at the Award Ceremony for the 12th Cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture – Lisbon, September 6, 2013

06 September 2013


Please also see: AKAA Press Material.

Bismillah-ir-Rahman-ir-Rahim

Your Excellency President Cavaco Silva
Your Excellency Vice-Prime Minister Paulo Portas
Honourable Mayor António Costa
Members of the Diplomatic Corps
Excellencies
Distinguished Guests
Ladies and Gentlemen

It is a special joy for me to welcome you this evening, and to thank you for being a part of this most auspicious ceremony, in this most appropriate place.

Returning to Portugal is always a great pleasure for me. The Ismaili Imamat and the Aga Khan Development Network have had a close, long-standing relationship with the Portuguese government and the Portuguese people, a relationship built on shared values.

This is the twelfth time over 36 years that we have presented the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. The award cycles have fostered a deeply enriching conversation during this time, one that has involved, altogether over 5000 nominated projects, and over 100 premiated ones.

Our ceremony tonight is only the second one we have held in predominantly Christian countries. I mention this point because it speaks to an essential dimension of the Award. While its roots lie deep in our concern for the state of Islamic architecture, the Award is also committed to a spirit of pluralism and a respect for diversity, a set of values which are deeply embedded in Portuguese history.

It was on the Iberian Peninsula, of course, that one of history’s great pluralistic societies flourished for several centuries, a home for Christian and Jewish peoples that was also part of an Islamic empire. Portugal has for many ages nourished a profound sense of what we might call “world awareness”. It was in that same spirit of “world awareness” that this Award was founded, and it is in that spirit that it is presented tonight.

We meet in a setting, this evening, which is one of Portugal’s architectural monuments. Its walls have been built and rebuilt over many centuries, by people of many civilisations. It crowns the capital of a truly cosmopolitan city.

The story of Portugal is in part the story of people who came from far away to settle in this beautiful land. And it is also the story of people who have gone out from Portugal to shape the heritage of places in every corner of the globe, from Eastern and Southern Asia, to the Persian Gulf, from Eastern and Western Africa to South America. And, even as I say these words, I remember the sense of overpowering beauty I felt when I first walked through the streets of Manaos in Brazil.

This legacy, moreover, continues to be renewed. As you may know, the year 2013 has been declared the “Year of Portuguese Architecture, ” and Portuguese architects continue to be an important source of global inspiration.

You can see why a moment ago I spoke of Portugal’s capacity for “world awareness”.

As I think back to the origins of this Award almost four decades ago, I recall my own growing realisation at that time that the proud architectural heritage of the Islamic world was endangered. Here was one of the world’s great architectural traditions, often inspired, as major architectural flowerings are so often, by one of the world’s great religious faiths.

And yet, this flowering had been allowed to decay, and in some cases almost to disappear. Nowhere else, in no other great cultural tradition, had this sort of compromise threatened such a rich inheritance. The result was that, for huge segments of the world’s population, cultural memory was fading, and an enormous cultural disaster seemed to be looming.

One part of the issue had been the effect of the colonial experience on Islamic cultures. But even in post-colonial or non-colonial settings, much of the Islamic architectural practice seemed to be consumed by a growing passion to be truly “modern”, or by a rudderless quest to be fashionably “global”.

At the same time, of course, some genuine architectural achievements were taking place. The problem was that these exceptional experiences were not widely shared, nor did they have a strong conceptual underpinning. It sometimes seemed as though a vast desert silence had set in. The purpose of the Award was to replace that silence with lively debate.

The Award was designed, from the start, not only to honour exceptional achievement, but also to pose fundamental questions. How, for example, could Islamic architecture embrace more fully the values of cultural continuity, while also addressing the needs and aspirations of rapidly changing societies? How could we mirror more responsively the diversity of human experience and the differences in local environments? How could we honour inherited traditions while also engaging with new social perplexities and new technological possibilities?

The three-year Award cycle was organised to take up such questions through a wide array of seminars, exhibitions, lectures, publications, and a highly decentralised award selection process. Over time, the Award has been joined by other programmes under the aegis of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, including our Historic Cities programme.

This new discourse, as wide as it has become, has had a continuing, common premise, a conviction that architecture has a capacity to transform the quality of human existence. More than that, we believed that our Quranic heritage gave us the responsibility, as good stewards of the Divine creation, to shape and reshape our earthly environment in the service of humankind.

In all this work, we were fortunate to be joined by a wonderful array of friends. It is heartwarming to think back on the contributions of so many people in so many places: architects, philosophers, artists, historians, and other professionals, from diverse faiths and cultures, who helped to shape and reshape our thinking. Their influence has been felt not only by professional architects and their clients, but also by an expanding array of participants; government officials and grant-makers, urban planners and village leaders, educators and researchers, engineers and financiers, and builders large and small. Also, many of them have contributed outside their own cultures, in order to help us rebuild our own.

Since the Award was presented in 1980 for the first time, successive Steering Committees have identified the pertinent issues of their time, and independent Master Juries have recognised exceptional achievements reflecting these concerns. The 2013 Steering Committee and this year’s Jury have continued in this great tradition.

Among the themes that have helped define this cycle is the concept of: “restoration” - interpreted as the revitalisation and re-adaptation of tradition. Another is the pursuit of design excellence in low-budget settings. Another key word is “infrastructure”, where imaginative rebuilding is a pressing public priority. And yet another important concept has been the “integration” of fragmented environments, urban and rural. And finally, community participation, an essential component for success.

In this respect, I would note that the world will soon reach a tipping point, where a majority of the world’s population for the first time will live in urban rather than rural environments. And so we must ask ourselves some searching questions: how, for example, can depopulated rural areas provide sufficient food and water to support dense urban agglomerations? And how can we best transform sprawling, impoverished human encampments into city neighborhoods that enhance the quality of human life?

Interestingly, we have had and we have seen in our own urban restoration programmes, the potential for bridging the urban-rural divide, for reintroducing something of the rural into the heart of the city. Parks and other open spaces, new and restored, can revive something of the balance between human construction and natural space. And they are astonishingly popular, with people of all economic backgrounds, and with people of all ages.

In these, as in so many other cases, it is amazing, and deeply humbling to see what a difference the built environment can make, in enhancing the everyday moments of everyday life.

The tasks are enormous. And these tasks must become our tasks. I have noticed, for example, that a significant number of the world’s new bleak and spreading cityscapes are in the Muslim world.

The pace of change is accelerating in our world and it is critical that the Architectural Award should continue to be positioned at the cutting edge of change. The future will bring an ever-demanding set of new challenges, such as global urbanisation. My hope is that the Award will always be responsive to the challenge of change.

Let me conclude by expressing my warmest congratulations to those who have been recognised by the Jury this evening, and by saluting those who have shaped this Award, over the past 36 years, and in this, its twelfth cycle. And finally, I am pleased again to extend my sincere gratitude to all of you for joining us at this presentation ceremony, and for sharing it with us, in a true spirit of “world awareness”.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dawn. com/news/1041321/iran-w-bank-projects-among-winners-of-aga-khan-awards

DAWN

Iran, W. Bank projects among winners of Aga Khan awards

From the Newspaper

Updated 2013-09-08 07:07:26

THE AGA Khan Awards for Architecture were presented by Portuguese President Aníbal Cavaco Silva at Lisbon’s Castle of Sao Jorge on Friday night, according to a press release.

The five projects which won the awards were: the Salam Centre for cardiac surgery in Khartoum, Sudan; revitalisation of the historic centre of Birzeit, in Israeli-occupied West Bank; Morocco’s Rabat-Salé urban infrastructure project; rehabilitation of a bazaar in Tabriz, Iran; and a Muslim cemetery in Altach, Austria.

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture was established in 1977 and is given out every three years. It considers all types of building projects that have an impact on today’s built environment _ from modest, small-scale projects to large complexes.

The list ranges from innovative mud and bamboo schools to state of the art “green” buildings that not only exhibit architectural excellence but also improve the overall quality of life.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From http: //www. bbc. co. uk/news/world-24047895


5 architectural projects get this year's Aga Khan Award

13 September 2013

An Islamic cemetery in Austria and a health centre in Sudan are among several projects to win the 2013 Aga Khan Award for Architecture.

The winning designs received a million dollar prize presented at an official ceremony in Portugal.

Since the award was launched 36 years ago, over 100 projects have received the prize for demonstrating architectural excellence and improving the overall quality of life in their regions.

Sylvia Smith reports from Lisbon.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

architectmagazine. com/awards/2013-aga-khan-award-for-architecture-winners-announced.aspx


Awards


From: ARCHITECT 2013
Posted on: September 13, 2013
Awards

Across Islamic World, Five Projects Take 2013 Aga Khan Awards for Architecture

This year's five winning projects represent leaders in architecture geared to Muslim community development.

By
Sara Johnson

The five winners of this year's Aga Khan Award for Architecture awards were announced last week. Founded in 1977, the awards are given out every three years to projects that exemplify community-building in locales with large Muslim constituencies.

This year's projects span continents (Africa, Asia, and Europe) and function. The winning projects are:

An Islamic cemetery in Altach, Austria by Bernardo Bader Architects (Dombirn, Austria). Completed in 2011, the cemetery serves the state of Vorarlberg, where eight percent of the population is Muslim, and allows these people to be buried in Austria with Muslim burial rituals.

Islamic cemetery, by Bernardo Bader Architects. Entrance elevation. Altach, Austria.

Credit: Adolf Bereuter

Two of the winning projects are located in northern Africa. The 63-bed Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery (Studio Tamassociati of Venice, Italy) is located in Khartoum, Sudan. The center also features housing for hospital staff built from containers used to move construction materials.

Credit: Raul Pantaleo

Salam Center for Cardiac Surgery, by Studio Tamassociati. Cafeteria terrace. Khartoum, Sudan.

Credit: Raul Pantaleo

The continent's second winning project is in Rabat, Morocco. Marc Mimram Architecture (Paris, France) was the architect of the 2011 Rabat-Salé Urban Infrastructure Project, consisting of the Hassan II Bridge and related infrastructure, which links Rabat and Salé.

Hassan II Bridge, by Marc Mimram Architecture. General view of the bridge. Rabat and Salé, Morocco.

Credit: Marc Mimram

The remaining winning projects are located in Asia. ICHTO East Azerbaijan Office (Tabriz, Iran) has been working to renovate and update Iran's Tabriz Historic Bazaar Complex.

The Tabriz Bazaar renovation, by ICHTQ East Azerbaijan Office. Detail of brick vaults. Tabriz, Iran.

Credit: Amir Anoushfar

In Palestine, the Riwaq Centre for Architectural Conservation (Ramallah, Palestine) is working to revitalize the Birzeit Historic Centre.

Birzeit historic center revitalization, by Riwaq. Birzeit University guest house after renovation. Birzeit, Palestine.

Credit: Riwaq

Spread across the five winning projects, the contest carries a one million dollar prize, although the Master Jury of the contest can award that money to any party involved in the project, such as the locale or client.
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