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Aga Khan Award for Architecture 2013
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kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 5:45 pm    Post subject: Aga Khan Award for Architecture 2013 Reply with quote

12th Cycle Launched; Now Open for Project Submissions

The twelfth triennial cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, which runs from 2011 until autumn 2013, is now open for nominations. General criteria for nomination are simple: “projects that set new standards of excellence in architecture, planning practices, historic preservation and landscape architecture”.

Projects are required to have been completed between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011 and been in use for at least one full year. They can be anywhere in the world but must successfully address the needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence.

http://www.akdn.org/architecture/
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2012 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steering Committee for Aga Khan Award's Twelfth Cycle Announced


Please also see the Aga Khan Award for Architecture Home Page.

The Aga Khan Award for ArchitectureGeneva, February, 2012 – The Aga Khan Award for Architecture has announced the members of the Steering Committee for the 12th Award cycle (2011 – 2013).

The Steering Committee is chaired by His Highness the Aga Khan. The other members of the Steering Committee are: Mohammad al-Asad (Founder and chairman, Center for the Study of the Built Environment, Amman, Jordan); Homi K. Bhabha (Director of the Humanities Center, Harvard University, USA); Norman Foster (Founder and chairman, Foster + Partners, London); Omar Abdulaziz Hallaj (CEO, Syria Trust for Development, Damascus); Glenn Lowry (Director, Museum of Modern Art, New York); Rahul Mehrotra (Principal, RMA Architects, Mumbai); Mohsen Mostafavi (Dean of the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, USA); Farshid Moussavi (Principal, Farshid Moussavi Architecture, London); Han Tümertekin (Principal, Mimarlar Tasarim Danismanlik Ltd, Istanbul). Farrokh Derakhshani is the Director of the Award. For more information about the Steering Committee, including biographies, please see the Steering Committee page.

The Steering Committee is the governing body of the Award. It is responsible for establishing the eligibility criteria for project nominations, providing thematic direction to the Award, and developing plans for its cyclical and long-term future. For each Award cycle, the Steering Committee appoints an independent Master Jury to select the award recipients from the nominated projects.

Established in 1977, the Aga Khan Award for Architecture is given every three years to projects that set new standards of excellence in architecture, planning practices, historic preservation and landscape architecture. The Award seeks projects that represent the broadest possible range of architectural interventions, with particular attention given to building schemes that use local resources and appropriate technology in innovative ways, and those that are likely to inspire similar efforts elsewhere. Projects can be anywhere in the world, but must successfully address the needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence.

The Aga Khan Award for Architecture has a prize fund of US$ 500,000. The rigor of its nomination and selection process has made it, in the eyes of many observers, one of the world’s most important architectural prizes. Projects that have received the Aga Khan Award for Architecture include the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, the Central Market of Koudougou, Burkina Faso, and the rehabilitation of the Walled City of Nicosia in Cyprus.

http://www.akdn.org/Content/1117/Steering-Committee-for-Aga-Khan-Awards-Twelfth-Cycle-Announced
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan prize doubled to US$1 million
By Yvonne Yoong 0 comments

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture (AKAA) prize has doubled to US$1 million (RM3.18 million) for the current cycle which runs from 2011 to 2013.

A snapshot of some of the speakers and participants taken at the AKAA thematic seminar on “ Emerging Models of Planning Practices“ in Singapore last week.

1 / 1Open for nominations until 15 September 2012, the award will be presented in 2013.

“The AKAA is meant to assist and support the recipients, ‘many of whom are neither well-known nor well-funded’ and one of the important aspects of the award is that winners should be able to reposition their future with the support they get from the award, both professionally and institutionally,” says Farrokh Derakhshani, director of AKAA.

“The aim of the award is to identify nominations that represent the “broadest possible range of architectural interventions” be it modest, small-scale buildings to skyscrapers, infrastructure, transportation undertakings, housing initiatives, educational and health campuses as well as new towns, urban conservation projects and re-use of sites,” he adds.

Essentially, the award seeks excellence in building schemes that use local resources combined with relevant technology that celebrate the innovative spirit of design which through their efforts will be likely to inspire similar efforts elsewhere.

Projects can be anywhere in the world but must address the “needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence”.

Selection of the award recipients are made by an independent master jury, which is reconstituted for every cycle. Malaysia’s Kamil Merican, founding principal of GDP Architects, was appointed as a Jury Member for the 2011- 2013 cycle.

The Award process is overseen by a Steering Committee, which includes His Highness the Aga Khan; Mohammad al-Asad (founder and chairman, Center for the Study of the Built Environment, Amman, Jordan); Homi K. Bhabha (director of the Humanities Center, Harvard University, USA); Norman Foster (founder and chairman, Foster + Partners, London); Omar Abdulaziz Hallaj (CEO, Syria Trust for Development, Damascus); Glenn Lowry (director, Museum of Modern Art, New York); Rahul Mehrotra (principal, RMA Architects, Mumbai); Mohsen Mostafavi (Dean of the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, USA); Farshid Moussavi (principal, Farshid Moussavi Architecture, London) and Han Tümertekin (principal, Mimarlar Tasarim Danismanlik Ltd, Istanbul).

For more information, log on to: www.akdn.org/architecture or contact Fay Cheah at faycheah@gmail.com

http://www.nst.com.my/red/aga-khan-prize-doubled-to-us-1-million-1.113348
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 3:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Emerging models of planning practices
By Y VONNE YOONG

INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture held its first international award seminar for its 2013 award cycle in Singapore last week

Held in Singapore on 19 and 20 July, the “Emerging Models of Planning Practices” thematic seminar organised by The Aga Khan Award for Architecture (AKAA) and supported by the Urban Redevelopment Authority Singapore, Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) saw presentations by international speakers.

Being the first international award seminar to be implemented during its current award cycle culminating in the award presentation in 2013, the seminar, besides examining models of planning practices adopted in different countries also showcased engagements across different political geographies. Approaching the workings of the “broader landscape”, the seminar sought the “multiplicity of agencies and actors that participate in the different modes of planning practices.” “Planning has evolved into new hybrid forms of practice, which are often richer versions of the earlier conventional planning instruments. In the process, several models have emerged out of particular political and geographical conditions that range from city states to cities of nation states.

“Within these contexts, the actors vary substantially, which often has a direct implication on the nature of planning instruments. In this pluralistic condition of producing cities and constructed landscapes, the traditional ‘masterplan’ has, in its format, become more inclusive in recognition of its dependency on other actors and agencies for implementation,” commented Rahul Mehrotra, Chair, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard GSD in his concept paper on “Identifying Emerging Models of Planning Practices.” The 19 invited speakers were divided into groups delivering their presentations in five sessions.

Serving as moderator for the first session on “New Paradigms, Infrastructure Urbanism” was Ng Wai Keen, NUS Associate Professor, Department of Architecture, School of Design and Environment. The moderator for the second session on “Cities of Learning” was Christopher Lee, Design Critic in Architecture and Urban Design, Harvard GSD. Mohsen Mostafavi, Dean, Faculty of Design, Harvard GSD, USA and member of the 2013 AKAA Steering Committee meanwhile moderated on the topic of “Curating the City”.

These three sessions concluded the first day of the seminar.

The following day, Professor Heng Chye Kiang, Dean, School of Design and Environment, NUS moderated on the topic “Emerging Territories”.

Mehrotra who is a member of the 2013 AKAA Steering Committee moderated on the topic “Cities in Asia”. Malaysia’s Ahmad Jefri Clyde who is the director of AJC Planning Consultants Sdn Bhd and Garis Architects Sdn Bhd presented three examples of the masterplan design during the colonial, post-colonial and the current era. He also analysed the changes shaping the masterplan of the country‘s two government administrative centres in Shah Alam and in Putrajaya under the “Emerging Territories” session.

Malaysian-born, London-based Christopher Lee, co-founder and principal of Serie Architects meanwhile elaborated on the topic of “Curating the City” in the context of relating architecture to the site and aspirations of the people.

The two-day seminar was preceded by the launch of the “Treasures of the Aga Khan Museum: Architecture in Islamic Arts” on 18 July at the Asian Civilisations Museum in Singapore.

Guests of honour included Prince Amyn Aga Khan, Chairman of the Aga Khan Museum and Dr Yaacob Ibrahim, Singapore Minister for Information, Communications and the Arts.

Organised by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture and the Asian Civilisations Museum, the Treasures of the Aga Khan Museum exhibition that runs from 19 July to 28 October “explores concepts of architecture and decoration in Islamic cultures through outstanding paintings, metalwork, ceramics, and architectural elements” from the Aga Khan Museum that is scheduled to open in Toronto next year.

http://www.nst.com.my/red/emerging-models-of-planning-practices-1.113746
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kmaherali



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

12th Cycle Launched; Now Open for Project Submissions

The twelfth triennial cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, which runs from 2011 until autumn 2013, is now open for nominations. General criteria for nomination are simple: “projects that set new standards of excellence in architecture, planning practices, historic preservation and landscape architecture”.

Projects are required to have been completed between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011 and been in use for at least one full year. They can be anywhere in the world but must successfully address the needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence.

Find out more

http://www.akdn.org/architecture/
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Master Jury Announced for 2013 Aga Khan Award for Architecture


Master Jury Will Select Recipients of US$ 1 Million Prize

Please also see: Biographies of the 2013 Master Jury Members


Geneva, 21 November 2012– The members of the Master Jury of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture were announced today. The Jury, which independently selects the recipients of the US$ 1 million Award, will convene in January 2013 to select a shortlist from hundreds of nominated projects. The shortlisted projects will then be subject to rigorous on-site reviews by independent experts. The Jury will meet for a second time in June 2013 to examine the on-site reviews and then select the final recipients of the Award.

The nine members of the Master Jury for the 2010-2013 Award cycle are:

Mr. David Adjaye, Principal, Adjaye Associates, London, United Kingdom
Dr. Howayda al-Harithy, Professor, Department of Architecture and Design, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
Mr. Michel Desvigne, Landscape Architect and Founder, Agence Michel Desvigne, Paris, France
Professor Mahmood Mamdani, Professor and Executive Director, Makerere Institute for Social Research (MISR), Wandegeya, Uganda
Mr. Kamil Merican, Principal Designer and CEO, Group Design Partnership, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Professor Toshiko Mori, Principal, Toshiko Mori Architect, New York City, USA
Ms. Shahzia Sikander, Artist, New York City, USA
Mr. Murat Tabanlioglu, Architect and Founder, Tabanlioglu Architects, Istanbul, Turkey
Mr. Wang Shu, Architect and Founder, Amateur Architecture Studio, Hangzhou, China

For more information, please see the biographies of Master Jury members.

http://www.akdn.org/Content/1163/Master-Jury-Announced-for-2013-Aga-Khan-Award-for-Architecture-
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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 1:44 pm    Post subject: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1NAWXXFo9M Reply with quote

Background music of this presentation required.. someone plz guide..
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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2013 Cycle Shortlisted Projects

http://www.akdn.org/architecture/awards.asp?tri=2013

******

Aga Khan Award Picks Work To Enhance Natural Ventilation
by Daniel Mathews
The Aga Khan Award for Architecture—the world’s most generous, and arguably most prestigious architectural award—has announced finalists for its 12th 3-year cycle.

The awards go to the parts of the world where Islam has a significant presence. That generally means the hotter parts, so it’s natural that they are finding designs with innovative ways of providing shade and focusing breeze. Alternatives to energy-hungry air conditioning, in other words

http://www.earthtechling.com/2013/05/aga-khan-award-picks-work-to-enhance-natural-ventilation/
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://tribune.com.pk/story/562259/muslim-architecture-fit-for-a-king/

Muslim architecture: Fit for a King
By Jean-Philippe Hugron / Translated By Caterina Grosso
Published: June 16, 2013
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Rehabilitation of Tabriz Bazaar in Iran.

The grand prize! It’s time for the stars of architecture to walk the runway. Peter Zumthor was crowned The Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2009 and was singled out by the Royal Institute of British Architects in 2013. Renzo Piano should be proud of his special mention at the French Prix d’architecture de l’Équerre d’argent (Silver T-square Prize) in 2012. In the meantime, the French Global Awards is looking for its laureates. And last but not least, once every three years, the Aga Khan Development Network offers the world another point of view.

From skyscrapers to vernacular architecture, from the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban to the Indonesians Rumah Asuh and Yori Antar… without a doubt the Aga Khan award for architecture offers the widest range imaginable. And on April 30 it announced its shortlist of 20 projects for this year. The current prize fund totals one million dollars and is presented to projects selected by an independent master jury. The final announcement will be made in the Autumn.

What is different about the award, founded in 1977, is that it tries to “identify and encourage building concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of societies in which Muslims have a significant presence”. And so, the jury can unanimously award the rehabilitation of a fort, the revitalisation of a downtown area or even a bridge. As the director of the award, Farrokh Derakhshani, puts it, the choices of 2013 mark the importance of “the impact of buildings and public spaces on the quality of life”.

There is also, of course, the strong ambition to show the vitality of some countries that do not come to the media’s attentions.

And so, one of the projects to be shortlisted this year, was a residential building in Mahallat, 200km south-east from Tehran. “The majority of Mahallat’s economy is engaged in the business of cutting and treating stone, over half of which is discarded due to inefficiencies in stone-cutting technology,” says a note on the AKDN website. “This project turns the inefficiency to economic and environmental advantage by reusing leftover stones for both exterior and some interior walls, and has led to the increasing adoption of stone recycling by local builders.” The project has thus set a real example for local builders.

In Indonesia, it was a project of thatched conical houses in ‘worok’ wood and bamboo that drew the attention of the jury. “A group of young Indonesian architects in the habit of touring a part of Indonesia each year arrived to find four of the last surviving examples of these houses, two of which were in need of renovation,” notes the awards committee. But the building skills, having traditionally been handed down, from generation to generation, had faded from memory. “The architects initiated and facilitated a community-led revival of traditional techniques, enabling all the original houses to be rebuilt.” The intention of renewing the ancient ‘savoir faire’ is certainly a noble one

Other projects are strongly more political; among these is the reconstruction of a refugee camp hosting 27,000 people built in Tripoli, Lebanon, in 1948, which “was 97% destroyed during the war in 2007”. And so is the building of a girls-only school in Herat, Afghanistan, at the Iranian-Turkish border.

The Museum of Paper museum in Gaoligong, China, offers another occasion for the foundation to remember that the region is “an area of significant Muslim presence”. A message doubtlessly addressed to the authorities in Beijing.

Finally a school in Kigali, Rwanda, has been shortlisted and that too a choice for a country that is mainly Catholic and Protestant, unlike its neighbours.

Twenty projects, known and unknown names, all different from one another. This list of running works is a snapshot of the architectural scene and of the world as it is.

This piece appeared in Le Courrier De L’architecte on May 29. The original headline was ‘Aga Khan, La Politique Et Son Prix’.

The translation has been edited for clarity.

Published in The Express Tribune, Sunday Magazine, June 16th, 2013.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

London, 16 May 2013 — At a special event held at the Ismaili Centre, Prince Amyn spoke in honor of the illustrious career of Professor Charles Correa, the globally acclaimed architect and planner, and acknowledged his long-standing partnership with the AKDN.

Video and more at:

http://www.theismaili.org/cms/1443/Prince-Amyn-speaks-in-honour-of-Professor-Charles-Correa-at-the-Ismaili-Centre-London


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Mawlana Hazar Imam is received by Minister Pedro Mota Soares upon his arrival in Lisbon. Photo: AKDN / Gary Otte

http://www.theismaili.org/cms/1461/Mawlana-Hazar-Imam-arrives-in-Portugal-for-the-Aga-Khan-Award-for-Architecture

Lisbon, 4 September 2013 — Mawlana Hazar Imam, accompanied by Prince Amyn, arrived in Portugal today, where the Award Ceremony for the 12th cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture will take place later this week. Hazar Imam and Prince Amyn were received by Pedro Mota Soares, Minister of Solidarity, Employment and Social Security, and Vazir Nazim Ahmad, AKDN Resident Representative for Portugal. President Aitmadi Amirali Bhanji of the Ismaili Council for Portugal welcomed them on behalf of the Jamat of Portugal.

Established by Mawlana Hazar Imam in 1977, the Aga Khan Award for Architecture seeks to identify and encourage building concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of communities in which Muslims have a significant presence. The Award recognises examples of architectural excellence in the fields of contemporary design, social housing, community improvement and development, historic preservation, reuse and area conservation, as well as landscape design and improvement of the environment.

For more information on the Award, please visit www.akdn.org/architecture, like the Award Facebook page at www.facebook.com/agakhanaward or follow the AKDN Architecture Twitter feed @AKDNarchitect.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.akdn.org/architecture/

Live Broadcast of the Aga Khan Awards for Architecture 2013 Ceremony on the AKDN Website

Arrangements have been made to webcast the entire 2013 Aga Khan Awards for Architecture ceremony live from Lisbon, Portugal, on 6 September. The webcast is expected to start at times listed hereunder* for different countries.


The exact link for the webcast will be posted on
<http://www.akdn.org/architecture> www.akdn.org/architecture shortly before the ceremony begins.

=================================

The 2013 ceremony of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture will take place on 6 September in Lisbon, Portugal, and will be broadcast live on the AKDN website starting at 8:30 PM Lisbon time (7:30 PM GMT). The website also includes detailed profiles of the projects that are shortlisted for this year’s award, as well as information about winners from past years.

Additional coverage of the Award can also be found on its official Facebook page, and by following @AKDNarchitect on Twitter.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.noticiasaominuto.com/cultura/104467/pr%C3%A9mio-aga-khan-%C3%A9-entregue-hoje-em-lisboa#.Uimlndj-W9A

Arquitetura Prémio Aga Khan é entregue hoje em Lisboa
O 12.º ciclo do Prémio Aga Khan para a arquitetura, com vinte projetos nomeados, vai ser anunciado hoje, numa cerimónia no Castelo de São Jorge, em Lisboa, em que estará presente o Presidente da República, Aníbal Cavaco Silva.
Prémio Aga Khan é entregue hoje em Lisboa
Lusa
Cultura
06:12 - 06 de Setembro de 2013 | Por Lusa

A capital portuguesa foi escolhida este ano para o anúncio deste prémio trienal, no valor de um milhão de dólares (770 mil euros), para projetos que marquem novos padrões de excelência na arquitetura, planeamento, preservação de património histórico e arquitetura paisagística.

A cerimónia, prevista para as 20:30, vai ser presidida pelo atual Aga Khan, Shah Karim Al Hussaini, o Presidente da República, Aníbal Cavaco Silva e o presidente da Câmara Municipal de Lisboa, António Costa, segundo a organização.

Estabelecido pela Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento em 1977, o prémio visa, em especial, "identificar e promover conceitos de construção que correspondam de forma eficaz às necessidades e aspirações de comunidades com significativa presença muçulmana".

A preservação de locais de oásis sagrados e coletivos em Guelmin (Marrocos), o restauro do Forte de Thula (Iémen), a reabilitação do Forte de Nagaur (Índia), a revitalização do centro histórico de Birzeit (Palestina), a reabilitação do bazar de Tabriz (Irão), a preservação do Mbaru Niang (Indonésia) e a habitação pós-tsunami (Sri Lanka) contam-se entre os vinte selecionados.

Entre os finalistas ficaram também a reconstrução do campo de refugiados de Nahr el-Bared (Líbano), o apartamento n.º 1 (Irão), o Instituto de Filme e Animação Kantana (Tailândia), o cemitério islâmico (Áustria), a escola primária Maria Grazia Cutuli (Afeganistão), o Liceu Francês Charles De Gaulle (Síria) e a escola primária Umubando (Ruanda).

A lista inclui ainda a torre Met (Tailândia), o Centro de Cirurgia Cardíaca Salam (Sudão), a Academia de Futebol Mohammed VI (Marrocos), o Centro de Interpretação do Mapungubwe (África do Sul), o Museu de Papel Artesanal (China) e a Ponte Hassan II (Marrocos).

Uma exposição com várias peças inéditas, que testemunham a herança islâmica na arquitetura em Portugal, vai também ser inaugurada hoje, no Castelo de São Jorge, em Lisboa, no âmbito da entrega do Prémio, com o apoio do Fundo Aga Khan para a Cultura.

A Rede Aga Khan envolve várias instituições cujos mandatos são exercidos nas áreas da saúde, da educação, da arquitetura, da microfinança, da promoção da iniciativa do setor privado e da revitalização de cidades históricas.

Aga Khan, imã hereditário dos muçulmanos Shia Imami Ismailis, é o líder institucional e espiritual de milhões de muçulmanos ismaelitas que vivem em todo o mundo, incluindo Portugal, e os seus seguidores consideram-no descendente direto do Profeta Maomé.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.publico.pt/cultura/noticia/vencedor-do-premio-aga-khan-de-arquitectura-e-anunciado-esta-sextafeira-em-lisboa-1604698

Vencedor do Prémio Aga Khan de Arquitectura é anunciado esta sexta-feira em Lisboa

Luís Miguel Queirós

03/09/2013 - 10:52

Vinte projectos espalhados pelo mundo, de um cemitério islâmico na Áustria a uma escola primária no Afeganistão, são candidatos a receber 760 mil euros
Preservação do Mbaru Niang


0

O prémio Aga Khan de Arquitectura vai ser entregue na próxima sexta-feira, dia 6, em Lisboa, no Castelo de S. Jorge. Patrocinado pela Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento, o prémio é atribuído de três em três anos, tem uma dotação pecuniária de um milhão de dólares (cerca de 760 mil euros), e privilegia projectos de arquitectura que correspondam às “necessidades e aspirações” de sociedades nas quais os muçulmanos tenham “uma presença significativa”.

Anunciada em Abril passado, a short list do prémio é bastante longa – inclui 20 candidatos – e abarca projectos construídos nos mais diversos pontos do globo, do Afeganistão à Áustria ou da China a Marrocos. A escolha é da responsabilidade de um júri internacional de nove elementos, nomeado por um comité de direcção ao qual cabe ainda actualizar regularmente os critérios de elegibilidade, atendendo às prioridades de cada momento.

O crescente prestígio deste prémio internacional de arquitectura não se prende apenas com os avultados montantes envolvidos, mas com a filosofia em que assenta. Valorizando o planeamento urbanístico, a preservação de locais históricos ou a arquitectura paisagística, o prémio só pode ser atribuído a projectos não apenas concretizados no terreno, mas que tenham já alguns anos de utilização. E o impacto real dos edifícios na vida das pessoas que os habitam, ou que de alguma forma os utilizam, é tomado em consideração. Uma lógica que leva a que a constituição dos júris inclua especialistas de várias disciplinas, e não apenas arquitectos.

O prestígio internacional alcançado pela arquitectura portuguesa, a importância da presença islâmica na história do país e a bem sucedida integração da comunidade muçulmana na sociedade portuguesa terão sido alguns dos motivos que levaram à escolha de Lisboa para a cerimónia de entrega desta 12ª edição do prémio, que será presidida por Cavaco Silva e na qual participarão o presidente da Câmara de Lisboa, António Costa, e o próprio Aga Khan. Quarto detentor deste título, o príncipe Karim – soberano sem território que reclama descender em linha directa do profeta Maomé – é ainda reconhecido como imã dos ismaelitas nizaritas, um ramo xiita que engloba cerca de 15 milhões de muçulmanos distribuídos por vários países.

Na sessão de sexta-feira, marcada para as 20h30, será apresentado um novo selo de correio comemorativo do prémio, e inaugurar-se-á ainda uma exposição ilustrativa da influência islâmica em Portugal, organizada em colaboração com a Gulbenkian, que ficará no Castelo de S. Jorge até final de 2013.

Vinte candidatos

A short list do prémio para o ciclo 2011-2013 inclui projectos tão diferentes entre si como um ambicioso plano da arquitecta e antropóloga Salima Naji para a preservação de quatro locais com oásis sacralizados e de uso colectivo nas montanhas marroquinas do anti-Atlas, um complexo habitacional erguido numa aldeia de pescadores no Sri Lanka que fora devastada pelo tsunami em 2004 (do atelier Shigeru Ban Architects), ou o cemitério islâmico em Altach, na Áustria (atelier de Bernardo Bader), construído numa região com quase dez por cento de população muçulmana.

O restauro do forte de Thula, no Iémen (arquitecto Abdullah Al-Hadrami, a reabilitação do forte de Nagaur, na Índia (arquitecto Minakshi Jain), a revitalização do centro histórico de Birzeit, na Palestina (Riwaq – Centro para a Conservação da Arquitectura), a reabilitação do bazar de Tabriz, no Irão (ICHTO East Azerbaijan Office) ou a reconstrução do campo de refugiados de Nahr el-Bared, no Líbano, promovido por uma agência das Nações Unidas, são outros projectos que chegaram à short list.

Um bom exemplo de que a dimensão da obra não é necessariamente um factor significativo é o facto de a lista integrar um projecto de preservação, numa aldeia da Ilha das Flores, na Indonésia, de quatro casas cónicas de madeira e bambu, com telhados de palha, raras sobreviventes de uma antiquíssima técnica de construção. Coordenado por Rumah Asuh e Yori Antar, o projecto envolveu um grupo de jovens arquitectos indonésios, que trabalhou em ligação com a comunidade local, procurando reabilitar uma arte esquecida.

Os restantes projectos que o júri irá analisar incluem um apartamento no Irão em cuja construção foram reutilizadas de sobras de pedras (Architecture by Collective Terrain), a sede do Instituto do Filme e Animação Kantana, na Tailândia (Bangkok Project Studio), uma escola primária em Herat, no Afeganistão (ateliers 2A+P/A e IaN+), construída em homenagem à jornalista italiana Maria Grazia Cutuli, assassinada no Afeganistão em 2001, uma outra escola primária em Kigali, no Ruanda (MASS Design Group), a sede do liceu francês Charles De Gaulle em Damasco, na Síria (Lion Associés, Dagher Hanna & Partners), a torre Met, em Banguecoque, na Tailândia (WOHA Architects), o Centro de Cirurgia Cardíaca Salam, no Sudão (Studio Tamassociati), o Centro de Interpretação do Mapungubwe, no Limpopo, África do Sul (Peter Rich Architects), um local com gravuras rupestres que é património de humanidade, o Museu de Papel Artesanal em Gaoligong, na China (Trace Architecture Office), a Academia de Futebol Mohammed VI, em Salé, Marrocos (Groupe 3 Architectes) e, também em Marrocos, a ponte Hassan II (Marc Mimran Architecture), que liga Rabat e Salé.

Um dos nove membros do júri que irá decidir qual destes projectos irá receber um milhão de dólares é o arquitecto britânico (Dar es Salaam, 1966), David Adjaye, que tem um projecto para Lisboa, o Centro Cultural Africano, África.cont, e é um dos arquitectos mais conhecidos da sua geração. Os restantes jurados são Howayda al-Harithy, presidente do Departamento de Arquitecura e Design da Universidade Americana de Beirute e especialista na história da arquitectura islâmica, o botânico, geógrafo e paisagista francês Michel Desvigne, colaborador de arquitectos como Norman Foster, Rem Koolhaas ou Renzo Piano, o sociólogo e politólogo Mahmood Mamdani, autor de obras sobre a história do colonialismo, Kamil Merican, director executivo do atelier Group Design Partnership, que venceu o Prémio Aga Khan para a Arquitectura em 2007 com o projecto da Universidade de Tecnologia Petronas, na Malásia, a arquitecta japonesa Toshiko Mori, o arquitecto chinês Wang Shu (Prémio Pritzker, 2012), a artista plástica paquistanesa Shahzia Sikander, radicada em Nova Iorque, e o arquitecto turco Murat Tabanlioglu, cujo atelier projectou o mais alto arranha-céus de Istambul, a torre Safira, e também o primeiro museu de arte moderna do país.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.lematin.ma/journal/entretien-avec-lamghari-essakl-directeur-general-de-l-agence-pour-l-amenagement-de-la-vallee-du-bouregreg_le-pont-hassan-ii-recompense-par-le-prix--aga-khan-de-l-architecture/187196.html

Le Matin.ma
mise à jour : Jeudi 5 Septembre 2013 18h46

Cinq parmi 20 projets sélectionnés dans le monde, en Afghanistan, en Autriche, en Chine, en Inde, en Indonésie, en Iran, au Liban, au Maroc, en Palestine, au Rwanda, en Afrique du Sud, au Sri Lanka, au Soudan, en Syrie, en Thaïlande et au Yémen ont été choisi par le jury du Prix Aga Khan d’architecture pour se partager un fonds de prix de 1 million de dollars en reconnaissance pour l’impact qu’ils ont eu sur la qualité de vie de leurs utilisateurs.

La cérémonie aura lieu le 6 septembre à Lisbonne et le prix sera délivré par Son Altesse le Prince Aga Khan et le Président du Portugal.

Parmi ces 5 projets sélectionnés, le projet du Pont Hassan II a été choisi, cet ouvrage d’art qui se distingue par son architecture et par son insertion dans le site est aussi un bien public qui fait l’admiration des citoyens des deux rives et des touristes. Ce pont, dont les travaux ont été lancés le 23 décembre 2007, a été inauguré par le Souverain le 18 mai 2011 et mis en service le même jour.

Le Prix Aga Khan d’architecture a pour «objectif d’identifier et d’aider les concepts de construction qui répondent avec succès aux besoins et aspirations des communautés dans lesquelles les musulmans ont une présence significative. Le prix récompense une architecture d’excellence qui permette en outre d’améliorer la qualité de vie en général. Il a lieu tous les 3 ans». Le jury se compose de membres éminents du domaine de l’architecture, parmi lesquels on compte cette année l‘architecte chinois Wang Shu, lauréat du Prix Pritzker en 2012. Les neufs membres du jury pour ce cycle 2010-2013 étaient : David Adjaye, architecte (Royaume-Uni), Howayda al-Harithy, professeur à l’Université américaine de Beyrouth (Liban), Michel Desvigne, paysagiste (France), Mahmood Mamdani, professeur à l’Institut Makerere pour la recherche sociale (Ouganda), Kamil Merican, architecte (Malaisie), Toshiko Mori, architecte (États-Unis), Shahzia Sikander, artiste (États-Unis), Murat Tabanlioglu, architecte (Turquie) et Wang Shu, architecte (Chine). Le prix sera décerné le 6 septembre à Lisbonne par le Prince Aga Khan et le Président du Portugal.

Ce prix aura une résonance particulière sur l’ensemble des projets de l’Agence pour l’aménagement de la vallée du Bouregrag qui entre dans une phase nouvelle. Les grands projets d’infrastructure que nous décrit Lemghari Essakl : tunnel, tramway, pont, marina... ont bénéficié d’un moment particulier : c’est la rencontre de besoins affirmés, de moyens d’exécution, d’un plan d’action et d’une volonté sans faille pour s’adapter à un monde qui change rapidement. Cet aménagement était devenu «une impérieuse nécessité», pour préserver du chaos un territoire hautement symbolique. Ce grand projet qui intègre plusieurs dimensions est un projet stratégique pour la région, c’est aussi un projet du temps long qui requiert des ressources financières importantes. Aujourd’hui, l’Agence pour l’aménagement de la vallée du Bouregreg entame une nouvelle phase de son développement, une phase qu’il faudra maitriser. Maintenant, nous explique M. Essakl, le déclic, c’est le marché qui a besoin d’une vitalité économique. Il faut donc continuer, maintenir l’effort, car nous sommes dans des projets de temps longs, mais les projets sont là». À preuve le Pont Hassan II, un ouvrage d’art qui suscite beaucoup d’admiration.

Ce choix est aussi d’excellent augure pour un grand événement qui se tiendra dans moins d’un mois dans la capitale : le Sommet mondial des cités qui est organisé tous les 3 ans se tiendra pour la première fois en terre africaine à Rabat. Le IVe congrès mondial de CGLU (Cités et gouvernements locaux unis) aura lieu du 1er au 4 octobre, coïncidant avec le centenaire du mouvement municipal international, né en 1913. Quelque 4 000 dirigeants locaux et régionaux, élus et hauts fonctionnaires, ministres, représentants d'ONG et Chefs d’État venus du monde entier vont débattre sur le thème «Imaginer la société, construire la démocratie», traitant de questions concrètes qui touchent la qualité de vie et l’accès aux services essentiels, la nouvelle gouvernance, la péréquation et la solidarité entre les territoires, la décentralisation, la démocratie participative…

Le Matin : C’est en 2006 qu’il a été décidé, compte tenu de l’ampleur du projet de l’aménagement du Bouregreg et de sa charge symbolique et historique, de confier à un opérateur unique de sa conduite. Ainsi est née l’Agence pour l’aménagement de la vallée du Bouregreg, un établissement public que vous dirigez. Un mot sur cette expérience ?

Lamghari Essakl : C’est un modèle que nous avons «osé» mettre en œuvre sous forme d’expérience et qui a donné des résultats. Il est important aujourd’hui de faire un bilan d’étape. L’établissement public avait pour vocation première de protéger un territoire qui avait connu des évolutions et des agressions non contrôlées, comme le rejet d’eaux usées domestiques et industrielles qui ont impacté son devenir. La vallée du Bouregreg est connue comme étant un site écologique et historique, certains ont parlé à juste titre de l’histoire des dégradations qui n’ont pas eu lieu grâce au travail de préservation et d’assainissement qui a été fait sur ce territoire. Un territoire important qui fait près de 60% d’une ville comme Paris intra-muros, soit 105 km², qui part de l’embouchure jusqu’au barrage Sidi Mohammed Benabdellah, mais qui au cours du temps n’avait pas eu la chance d’être protégé. Le site, fortement menacé et altéré par de multiples agressions (décharges d’ordure, eaux usées, exploitations de carrières, quartiers clandestins), a été protégé contre les extensions de l’urbanisation accélérée et anarchique qui menace les villes du monde entier. Au Maroc, il y a eu un développement, une prolifération importante d’habitats sociaux et de «poches anarchiques» urbaines créées sans autorisation sur des terrains non lotis, c’est-à-dire non viabilisés. À Salé, la ville est passée de 250 000 à 850 000 habitants, une évolution marquée par beaucoup de nuisances, mais aussi par un déficit en équipements collectifs, en infrastructures et en services publics.

«Nous sommes une agence d’aménagement»

Vous avez parlé de modèle, sur quels principes repose ce modèle ?

Notre ambition est portée par des fondamentaux : le premier c’est la sauvegarde écologique, une impérieuse nécessité en raison des dégradations que j’ai évoquées, le respect du patrimoine historique à haute portée symbolique, car la vallée est un site exceptionnel par ses monuments, ses paysages et les fonctions religieuses et intellectuelles de certains lieux et espaces. Tout acte d’aménagement doit chercher son inspiration dans ce legs architectural et historique. Autre principe : le lien et l’unification des deux villes de Rabat et de Salé pour créer une zone de prospérité qui profiterait à l’ensemble de l’agglomération. C’est au fleuve du Bouregreg que les deux villes de Rabat et de Salé doivent leur naissance et ces deux villes jumelles ont grandi dos à dos depuis des siècles.

Il fallait les réunir. Notre projet d’aménagement, qui a autant de valeur pour Rabat que pour Salé, avait pour objectif de créer une symbiose de vie et de développement entre les deux rives du fleuve Bouregreg, tout en créant dans la vallée du Bouregreg un lieu de vie et de nouveaux espaces urbanistiques. Pour accompagner ce projet, l’Agence a axé ses efforts sur sa mission d’aménagement. Nous sommes une Agence d’aménagement et non de développement urbain qui peut être confié à des sociétés ou au privé. Et l’aménagement commence pour nous, par les solutions apportées pour assurer la mobilité des citoyens qui sont au cœur de nos préoccupations. L’urbanisme ne peut réussir que s’il a inscrit au cœur de ses préoccupations la problématique de la mobilité. Des études préalables nous ont montré que plus de 650 000 personnes, transportées par quelque 150 000 véhicules, transitaient chaque jour par la vallée du Bouregreg et que les itinéraires de franchissement portés par les ponts de Moulay Hassan, Moulay Youssef, Al Fida et Mohammed V étaient sollicités à saturation. Pour permettre aux citoyens de ce territoire de se déplacer d’un endroit à l’autre, il faut assurer un schéma, construire des ouvrages comme le pont

Hassan II qui est un ouvrage exceptionnel et complexe, qui sera récompensé par le Prix Aga khan de l’architecture. La cérémonie aura lieu le 6 septembre à Lisbonne et le prix sera délivré par Son Altesse le Prince Aga Khan et le Président du Portugal. Nous avons, après des études importantes, restitué la mobilité et la navigabilité à travers le fleuve, car il ne faut pas oublier que Rabat abritait le premier port du Royaume avant la construction de celui de Casablanca. L’estuaire du Bouregreg est même devenu un poste de frontière avec police et douane. Les touristes peuvent entrer au Maroc par la voie maritime de Rabat Salé. Nous avons enfin anticipé l’avenir et réalisé un tunnel sous les Oudayas qui va desservir la Rocade atlantique, de la rive du Bouregreg jusqu’à Temara sur la voie côtière. Cela permettra aux citoyens d’accéder à la ville de Rabat par la porte de Bab el-Had, par la porte de Kamra, pour désengorger le site. Avec la réalisation du projet du tramway, un transport écologique qui a amélioré l’offre de transport collectif, notre établissement a permis de lever un tabou, celui de la fatalité de l’échec.

Le tramway qui circule actuellement a une capacité de 700 voyageurs, ce qui correspond à 120 taxis blancs ou 12 bus, fonctionne bien sans incident majeur. Il y a eu quelques incidents corporels, parfois dramatiques, dus sans doute à la nouveauté de ce transport collectif.

L’agence a développé ses missions d’aménagement, dites-vous, qu’en est-il du plan d’aménagement ?

Le plan d’aménagement du territoire de la Vallée a été promulgué en septembre 2009. Notre établissement, créé en janvier 2006, a tenu son premier conseil d’administration en juin 2006, notre budget a été approuvé en juillet 2006 et le plan d’aménagement promulgué en septembre 2009, ce qui est un exploit, car les plans d’aménagement prennent habituellement beaucoup plus de temps !
Il faut continuer et maintenir l’effort

Quels sont aujourd’hui les projets de l’Agence ?

Aujourd’hui que les fondamentaux que j’ai évoqués sont réalisés, à savoir protéger le site, assainir la situation complexe du foncier qui appartient à l’État, aux villes de Rabat et de Salé, au ministère des Habous et aux particuliers, promulguer le plan d’aménagement, réaliser les infrastructures, on peut se poser la question de la vocation future de ce site et de son développement. L’Agence a préparé l’environnement, il reste aujourd’hui la partie développement du site.

Nous avons prévu dans nos textes et nos statuts la possibilité pour l’Agence de créer des structures détenues par des établissements ou des sociétés de droit privé pour amorcer ce développement en partenariat public-public ou public-privé. C’est ce que nous avons fait pour réaliser le projet de Bab Bahr sur la rive droite, où nous sommes en partenariat avec une société émiratie. Le projet prévoit la construction de deux hôtels, dont l’un devrait démarrer prochainement, la construction de 1 500 logements sous forme d’appartements, la construction de 70 000 m² de plancher de bureaux et 60 000 m² de commerce. Il faut savoir que nous avons démarré ce projet en 2006, une période de très forte inflation des matières premières, avec un baril qui avait atteint le niveau historique de 140 dollars et, pour couronner le tout, la crise mondiale financière et aujourd’hui un contexte de grand retournement dans le monde arabe.

Malgré tout, nous avons tenu le coup pour réaliser nos projets d’infrastructures, car nous avions le financement nécessaire.
Nous avons eu la chance d’être dotés jusque-là par le budget général de l’État, par le Fonds Hassan II pour le développement économique et social et par la Direction générale des collectivités locales pour réaliser nos projets. Aujourd’hui, les finances publiques sont en difficulté, on nous demande de mobiliser d’autres sources de financement, ce que nous faisons auprès de bailleurs de fonds comme l’Agence française de développement, la BEI... Nous avons un territoire, un bon patrimoine, car nous sommes assis sur une réserve foncière très importante, nous avons mis en place une vision d’urbanisme, des infrastructures, nous avons acquis au fil de ces dernières années, une crédibilité. Maintenant, le déclic, c’est le marché qui a besoin d’une vitalité économique. Il faut donc continuer, maintenir l’effort, car nous sommes dans des projets de temps longs, mais les projets sont là… Nous avons obtenu 4 450 milliards de DH pendant 7 ans. L’Agence a restitué à l’État 980 millions de DH sous forme d’impôts et de taxes, payé pour l’accompagnement social quelque 350 millions de DH, accompagné le concessionnaire REDAL pour renouveler tous les réseaux souterrains pour 300 millions de DH. L'Agence possède, comme je l’ai dit, un important patrimoine foncier, le tramway est une structure publique, la marina et le tunnel sont réalisés et le site est préservé, ce sont là autant d’atouts pour nos futurs investisseurs.

Comment pourriez-vous qualifier vos relations avec les différents partenaires : élus, présidents de région ?

Nous avons entretenu d’excellentes relations et nous avons été soutenus sur tous les plans. J’ai travaillé avec deux présidents du conseil de la ville de Salé et deux présidents du conseil de la ville de Rabat qui nous ont soutenus. J’ai également travaillé sans différence aucune, avec trois présidents du conseil d’administration de notre établissement public : Driss Jettou, Abbès El Fassi et Abdelilah Benkirane, qui nous ont tous accompagné avec détermination. Aujourd’hui, nous devons nous autofinancer, mobiliser des fonds et amorcer la phase du développement de la vallée du Bourereg.

Publié le : 3 Septembre 2013 - Farida Moha, LE MATIN
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