Français  |  Mission  |  About us  |  Disclaimer  |  Contact  |  What's new  |  FAQ  |  Search  | 

Welcome to The Heritage Web Site

-->
MY HERITAGE
New Heritage
Main Page
New Account
Set as Homepage
My Account
Logout
GOLDEN JUBILEE
Statistics
DIDARS
COMMUNICATE
Forums
Guestbook
Members List
Recommend Us
NEWS
Timelines
Ismaili History
Today in History
LEARN
Library
Youth's Corner
Ginans
FAIR
Gallery
Photo Album
Others


www.ismaili.net :: View topic - MHI Interviews and Articles
FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups  ProfileProfile   
Login to check your private messagesLogin to check your private messages

MHI Interviews and Articles
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.ismaili.net Forum Index -> Imamat/ Noorani Family Activities
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 4730

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote































Back to top
View users profile Send private message Visit posters website
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

His Highness the Aga Khan's 2008 book 'Where Hope Takes Root – Democracy and Pluralism in an interdependent World’ (Canada)

Dear Friends,

NanoWisdoms' Suggested Readings series highlights important selections from our Archive of Imamat speeches, interviews and writings. This installment's selection is His Highness the Aga Khan's 2008 book Where Hope Takes Root – Democracy and Pluralism in an interdependent World.
Published in 2008, Where Hope Takes Root is a collection of 13 of the Aga Khan's principal speeches, made between 2002 and 2006, along with his important 2006 interview with the CBC's Peter Mansbridge. Focused on the theme "democracy and pluralism in an interdependent world," the book -- which deserves to be read repeatedly -- could arguably be subtitled as "The Essential Aga Khan."

The NanoWisdoms Archive is pleased to make this seminal collection available at the link below for those who have not had the opportunity to read it.
Click here for this NanoWisdoms' Suggested Reading:
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10404/

Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and we thank you for your support and assistance.
Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Interview Transcript: His Highness the Aga Khan's 2008 Syrian TV Interview (Aleppo, Syria)

Dear Friends,
In August 2008, following the Opening Ceremony of the Aleppo and Masyaf Citadels and the Castle of Salah ad-Din, His Highness the Aga Khan gave Syrian TV a wide-ranging and important interview. The NanoWisdoms Archive is pleased to make available the interview's transcript for all to study and reflect over at these critical times.
Among the many topics covered, the Aga Khan discusses AKDN's extensive development plans for Syria, the role of culture as a development strategy and his firm belief in employing public-private partnerships to meet societal needs. The interview ends with the Aga Khan's message to the Syrian people and the Ummah, setting out Syria's unique place in Islam's history and informing the Ummah, twice, that "progress does not mean occidentalisation" and that Muslim "values systems are massively important for the future.

Click for the interview transcript and video at NanoWisdoms:
His Highness the Aga Khan's 2008 Syrian TV Interview (Aleppo, Syria)
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/9004/

Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and I thank you for your support and assistance.
Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
P.S.
We suggest you add our e-mail address, nanowisdoms@sent.com, to your address book so that future emails from us are not accidentally removed by your spam filter.
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Age Interview, Geoffry Barker, ‘Aga Khan: Enigma of East and West’ (Melbourne, Australia; Nairobi, Kenya)

http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10329/
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III's 1946 lecture at the Dar es Salaam Cultural Society, 'World Peace and Its Problems' (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania)

Dear Friends,
Almost 70 years ago -- within a year of the Allies' World War II victory, the establishment of the United Nations and the partition of India -- Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III, noting that 'what is history except on rare occasions one long, long story of war and warfare?', delivered this sweeping, global assessment outlining out potential contributions the major actors on the world stage -- the United States, Europe, Russia and China -- could offer to ensure world peace.

While Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah singles out the United States and Britain as the linchpins for a peaceful, post World War II world -- explaining that "without a common peace policy of these two central world powers ... we will be building on the sands of the seashore" -- he also issues a cautionary note that it was also essential to draw the curtain on the era of "plantation" colonialism, lest the colonies themselves become "apples of discord" and "breeding grounds for future world warfare."

Particularly noteworthy from his assessments are, firstly, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah's observation that China has "from time immemorial [been] essentially peaceful ... and has for thousands of years never shown any spirit of aggression and has been one of the bastions of moral peace and live and let live in the world." And secondly -- particularly in light the present Aga Khan's call for nations to cooperate with one another on common issues through regional alliances -- was his retrospection that "the absence of proper provisions for regional alliances organised under the League [of Nations] itself, for the maintenance of peace, was another, and perhaps the most serious, of the causes of its break-down when it came up against the realities of power politics."
Notwithstanding that, given more recent events, informed observers are of the opinion that the United States has forgone the nobler role of peacekeeper it had assumed in the years immediately following World War II, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah's global assessment, remains as relevant in today's troubled times of as it was some 70 years ago.

Click here for this NanoWisdoms' Suggested Reading:
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10454/
Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and we thank you for your support and assistance.
Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III's 1925 article 'How to live long' (London, United Kingdom)
Dear Friends,

Almost 90 years ago -- decades before the more recent interest in health, diet and exercise -- Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, Aga Khan III, wrote this short but lovely article on keeping healthy opening it with the remark that "all my life I have been keenly interested in the kindred subjects of exercise and diet, and their influence on the general health and fitness of the human body."

His advice -- which could have been written today with little if any change -- is concise, practical, at least half a century ahead of its time and worthy of everyone's attention.

Click here for this NanoWisdoms' Suggested Reading:
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10497/

Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and we thank you for your support and assistance.

Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Friends,
His Highness the Aga Khan has been the driving force behind an ambitious project to revitalise his home town neighbourhood of Chantilly. The Fondation de Chantilly — established by the Aga Khan in 2005 — "seeks to leverage the area’s cultural assets to create a sustainable model for heritage preservation and contribute towards social, cultural and economic development in the region."

As part of the effort a new museum, The Museum of The Horse, was developed and opens this weekend. Francesca Cumani, whose father trained horses for the Aga Khan, talks with him as they walk through the museum.

Click for the interview transcript at NanoWisdoms:
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10536/

Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and I thank you for your support and assistance.
Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2015 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NEW INTERVIEW: The Aga Khan's little known 1966 Radio Tanzania Interview

Dear Friend,

In late 1966, His Highness the Aga Khan made an extensive 54 day tour of East Africa, visiting Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malagasy Republic (now Republic of Madagascar) and the Comoros Islands. During his tour he delivered many speeches and granted several interviews, all of which are now very hard to locate. It is, therefore, our great pleasure that we are able to bring to you his full Radio Tanzania interview from a rare copy of the transcript that was kindly made available to us by a member of the Jamat.

There are many such little known speeches and interviews, especially from the Aga Khan's early years, which we are constantly trying to locate. Both we and the Jamat, would be most grateful if those of you with archives and memorabilia from these times would search through your collections for any speeches and interviews you may have, particularly from this 1966 East Africa visit.

Click here to read His Highness the Aga Khan's little known 1966 Radio Tanzania Interview:
http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/1422/

Please do share this e-mail with your family, friends and jamats and we thank you for your support and assistance.

Kind regards,
Mohib Ebrahim
Editor and Publisher
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2016 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

His Highness Aga Khan interview for Portugal TV

In English

VIDEO:
http://www.rebirthofportugal.com/news-portugal/his-highness-aga-khan-interview-for-portugal-tv/

This is not a recent one.
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wordfest presents Governor General David Johnston – FREE

Join Wordfest and the Calgary Public Library for an evening with His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, who presents his new book, The Idea of Canada: Letters to a Nation. A book signing will follow the event.

Governor General David Johnston offers a spirited and inspiring exploration of the moments, virtues, habits and decisions that have made Canada unique in the world. Written as a series of letters to characters and individuals living and dead, eminent and unknown, The Idea of Canada is a record of the social forces that have shaped, consumed and inspired the author to think of Canada as an idea long worthy of expression and now searching for refinement.

The author sets his thoughts out to friends and icons as disparate as singer Céline Dion, astronaut Chris Hadfield, His Highness the Aga Khan, the Unknown Soldier, Olympian Clara Hughes, members of the Canadian Armed Forces, lawyer Purdy Crawford, author John Buchan, former Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, Quebec mayor Régis Labeaume, and a 10-year old Inuit boy who asked simply, “Who are you, anyway?”

More...
http://wordfest.com/session/wordfest-presents-governor-general-david-johnston/
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan, « Prince » du développement

http://www.jeuneafrique.com/mag/465397/economie/aga-khan-prince-du-developpement/

English Translation:

Translation from the original French version published on August 24, 2017 at 10:47
By Marion Douet – Special Envoy to Abidjan

Aga Khan “Prince” of Development | Jeune Afrique

“He has a very good understanding of Africa, Asia of course, but also of the globality of the world.


He is at one and the same time an extremely courteous and well-balanced person, who never boasts, and very intelligent, with very geo-strategic reflection.”


– Jean-Michel Severino, Development Specialist,

French Development Agency

His Highness the Aga Khan, spiritual leader to millions of Muslim, delivers the Jodidi Lecture, at Harvard University, on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015in Cambridge, Mass. The Aga Khan spoke about the challenges to a pluralistic society. (Image via Jeune Afrique)

Chemical industry, luxury hotels, media, but also social works … This royalty without a kingdom is on all fronts. In six decades, he has built an empire dedicated to the fight against poverty, with a strong presence in West Africa. Investigation of a man as discreet yet powerful.

He is Imam, and it is with the honors reserved to the heads of state that the Aga Khan will be welcomed, on the occasion of his sixtieth anniversary as spiritual leader of the Ismailis, in each of the twenty countries. He will visit during this year during the festivities of his diamond jubilee, launched on July 11 in the French domain of Chantilly, north of Paris. Prince Aga Khan will travel the world to meet ihis 15 million faithfuls, scattered between the cradle of Central Asia and four other continents.

The list of countries visited is still secret, but each stage will be an opportunity to fulfill the three missions which he considers to be indivisible:
•that of spiritual guide of the Ismaili community;
•Philanthropist, one of the most active on the planet; and finally
•that of a prolific investor.



A strong relationship with West Africa

While the Aga Khan is very attached to East Africa, he also maintains a strong relationship with the west of the continent. The latter was born in 1963, on the occasion of a call for help from Félix Houphouët-Boigny, Côte d’Ivoire’s first president.

The father of Ivorian independence wanted a factory in Abidjan to manufacture jute bags that was required to transport the precious cocoa. He knew that the Aga Khan had interests in this industry in Bangladesh, where the natural fiber used to produce this packaging comes from.


“His [Aga Khan’s] vision was to bring Côte d’Ivoire to become the world’s largest cocoa producer.”

– Ibrahim Charles Amadou,

CEO of Filtisac, part of IPS group of companies of AKFED

Prince Aga Khan accepted and launched the construction of Filtisac, which was inaugurated two years later, becoming the first asset of the industrial holding company IPS in Africa.

With this investment, the Aga Khan intended to help the empowerment of the new nations “by substituting a local industry for imports,” said his collaborators.

“His vision was to get Côte d’Ivoire to become the world’s largest producer of cocoa,” said Nigerian Ibrahim Charles Amadou, a native of Nigeria, who receives us in his office as Chief Executive Officer of Filtisac. The walls, old newspaper covers traces the visits to the premises of illustrious figures, from the American president Richard Nixon to the current head of the IMF, Christine Lagarde.

Even today, Filtisac is the emblem of the Aga Khan network in West Africa.



AKDN - AKFED companies - Jeune Afrique - Aga Khan Prince of Development
AKDN – AKFED companies (image credit: Jeune Afrique)



Great knowledge of Africa

It was in Kenya that Karim, born in Geneva in 1936, grandson of the previous Aga Khan, Mahomed Shah, spent his childhood. And it was in Tanzania, in Dar es Salaam, that he was against all expectations enthroned forty-ninth Imam of the Ismailis in 1957.

Jean-Michel Severino, who regularly met the Prince during the years 2000 when he was head of the French Development Agency (one of his main partners in Africa), “modernity” is precisely one of the features The most salient of this man, about whom he does not cease to praise: “He is at one and the same time an extremely courteous and well-balanced person, who never boasts, and very intelligent, with very geo-strategic reflection . He has a very good understanding of Africa, Asia of course, but also of the globality of the world, “says the development specialist.



Non-profit activities

At the turn of the 1960s, in the midst of euphoria of independence, one of the first decisions of the new Imam was to place development at the heart of its action.


A huge machine with 80,000 employees, its network [AKDN] spends $925 million annually.

“Prior to 1957, there were already schools, hospitals, banks and insurance companies in Asia and East Africa, but it is the present Aga Khan who created, organized and expanded the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), “said Malagasy representative Ferid Nandjee, a diplomatic representative of the Aga Khan in West Africa.

An enormous machine, AKDN employing 80,000 people worldwide, the “network” spends $925 million annually (€788 million).

The AKDN mainly focuses on non-profit activities in the fields of culture (Cairo Al-Azhar Park, Mopti and Timbuktu Mosques) and education (from early childhood to university), and the network has also invested in no fewer than ninety companies, through its Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED). Established in Switzerland, it is divided into poles: industry (IPS), tourism (TPS), aviation, finance, etc.

In eastern Africa, Kenya is both a strong place for the community and for AKFED, which has full swathes of the economy: banks and insurance (including Diamond Trust Bank), the Frigoken canning factory , The media empire Nation Media Group (publisher of the Daily Nation, the country’s first daily newspaper) and the luxury hotel chain Serena.

Difficult to evaluate, its economic weight makes the media quick to depict the Aga Khan as a “wealthy businessman”, to the dismay of his diplomatic representatives, who insists on the humanist vocation of all his action, even economic . “He is a profound benefactor,” says a business lawyer who knows AKFED well.

“Not only are companies used to finance the works, but note that they did a lot in West Africa, where there was not a single Ismaili on their arrival. They were both pioneers of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and private equity, at a time when neither of them existed in the region. ”

AKFED is a UFO in the economic world. Halfway between patronage, investment fund and development agency.

For most of the sources we interviewed, the latter is the closest to its philosophy (IFC and DEG are shareholders of IPS WA while the Aga Khan owns some shares of Proparco). But if AKFED is able to wait a long time for a return on investment, he also dares riskier bets.




“If a member is a business banker in New York and AKFED asks him to come, he will be there overnight”



“The fund is involved in operations that do not attract anyone,” says a financier who rubbed shoulders with his teams, praising “people of great capacity”. Another singularity, the Imamat is able to attract the best skills of his community. “If a member is a business banker in New York and AKFED asks him to come, he will be there overnight,” said one partner who praised the seriousness and dedication of his team members.

“We are long-term partners for these countries and, whatever the crises they are going through, we do not abandon them,” said Ferid Nandjee.

Read the complete story at the source http://www.jeuneafrique.com/mag/465397/economie/aga-khan-prince-du-developpement/

https://ismailimail.wordpress.com/2017/08/24/aga-khan-prince-of-development-jeune-afrique/
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 4730

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.jeuneafrique.com/mag/465397/economie/aga-khan-prince-du-developpement/

[Notes from Admin: Hospitals and Schools are missing from this summary]



Aga Khan, « Prince » du développement
Publié le 24 août 2017 à 10h47 — Mis à jour le 24 août 2017 à 18h14
Par Marion Douet et Nadoun Coulibaly





Industrie chimique, hôtellerie de luxe, médias, mais aussi œuvres sociales... Cette altesse sans royaume est sur tous les fronts. En six décennies, il a bâti un empire consacré à la lutte contre la pauvreté, avec une forte présence en Afrique de l'Ouest. Enquête sur un homme aussi discret que puissant.

Il est imam, mais c’est avec les honneurs réservés aux chefs d’État que l’Aga Khan sera accueilli, à l’occasion de son soixantième anniversaire en tant que chef spirituel des ismaéliens, dans chacun des vingt-cinq pays qu’il visitera au cours de cette année. Les festivités de ce jubilé de diamant, lancées le 11 juillet dans son domaine français de Chantilly, au nord de Paris, l’amèneront ainsi à parcourir le monde à la rencontre de ses 15 millions de fidèles, éparpillés entre leur berceau d’Asie centrale et les quatre autres continents.

La liste des pays visités est encore secrète, mais chaque étape sera l’occasion de remplir les trois missions qui lui sont assignées et qu’il considère comme indivisibles : celle de guide spirituel de la communauté ismaélienne, une branche minoritaire du chiisme ; celle de philanthrope, l’un des plus actifs de la planète à l’instar du magnat de l’informatique Bill Gates ; et, enfin, celle d’investisseur prolifique.

Comme lors des précédents jubilés se succéderont processions religieuses, réceptions mondaines et annonces de projets à plusieurs dizaines de millions de dollars.

Il y a dix ans, à l’occasion de son jubilé d’or, le « prince », comme le désignent ses interlocuteurs (les fidèles préférant « Son Altesse »), avait lancé en Ouganda le barrage hydraulique de Bujagali, au bord du lac Victoria, devenu depuis son inauguration, en 2012, l’épine dorsale de la production électrique du pays.

« C’est un moment spécial pour moi », déclarait alors au cours d’un banquet organisé à Kampala cet homme qui parle aussi bien l’anglais que le français et l’arabe, à propos du voyage qu’il venait d’achever en l’Afrique de l’Est. Cette région a « une signification particulière pour la communauté ismaélienne, pour les institutions du réseau Aga Khan et pour moi, personnellement, depuis un demi-siècle », ajoutait-il.
Une grande connaissance de l’Afrique

C’est au Kenya que Karim, né à Genève en 1936, petit-fils du précédent Aga Khan, Mahomed Shah, a passé son enfance. Et c’est en Tanzanie, à Dar es-Salaam, qu’il sera contre toute attente intronisé quarante-neuvième imam des ismaéliens en 1957.

À la surprise générale, c’est lui, l’étudiant de Harvard âgé de 20 ans, que l’Aga Khan désigne à sa mort pour lui succéder, et non, comme le veut la tradition, son père, Ali.

Ce dernier, d’après l’auteur français Yann Kerlau dans son livre Les Aga Khans, bien plus attiré par « les lumières de Hollywood » (son mariage tumultueux avec l’actrice américaine Rita Hayworth a fait pendant des années la une des tabloïds) que par l’imamat, ne faisait en effet pas figure de candidat idéal.

Il possède une très bonne compréhension de l’Afrique, de l’Asie bien sûr, mais aussi de la globalité du monde

« Cette décision était une première en mille trois cents ans d’histoire, souligne l’une de nos sources. C’était la guerre froide, le monde était bousculé, il y avait l’avènement de la menace nucléaire. L’Aga Khan a voulu quelqu’un de jeune, d’inscrit dans la modernité pour lui succéder. » L’aïeul ne s’est, semble-t-il, pas trompé.

Pour Jean-Michel Severino, qui a régulièrement rencontré le prince au cours des années 2000 lorsqu’il dirigeait l’Agence française de développement (l’un de ses principaux partenaires en Afrique), la « modernité » est justement l’un des traits les plus saillants de cet homme à propos duquel il ne tarit pas d’éloges : « C’est à la fois quelqu’un d’extrêmement courtois et pondéré, qui ne se glorifie jamais, et de très intelligent, à la réflexion très géostratégique. Il possède une très bonne compréhension de l’Afrique, de l’Asie bien sûr, mais aussi de la globalité du monde », égrène le spécialiste du développement. Avant d’ajouter : « C’est un profond démocrate, peut-être parce que sa communauté, systématiquement minoritaire là où elle vit, a besoin de la démocratie pour s’en sortir. »
Des activités non lucratives

Au tournant des années 1960, en pleine euphorie des indépendances, l’une des premières décisions du nouvel imam est de placer le développement au cœur de son action.

Énorme machine de 80 000 employés, son réseau dépense chaque année 925 millions de dollars.

« Avant 1957, il existait déjà des écoles, des hôpitaux, des banques et des compagnies d’assurances en Asie et en Afrique de l’Est, mais c’est l’Aga Khan actuel qui va créer, organiser et étendre l’Aga Khan Development Network [AKDN, Réseau Aga Khan pour le développement] », explique le Malgache Ferid Nandjee, représentant diplomatique de l’Aga Khan en Afrique de l’Ouest.

Énorme machine employant 80 000 personnes dans le monde, le « réseau » dépense chaque année 925 millions de dollars (soit 788 millions d’euros, provenant notamment des dons de la communauté, dont ne sont connus ni les montants ni la traçabilité).

L’AKDN se consacre principalement à des activités non lucratives dans les domaines de la culture (parc Al-Azhar du Caire, mosquées de Mopti et de Tombouctou) et de l’éducation (depuis la petite enfance jusqu’à l’université), mais le réseau a également investi dans pas moins de quatre-vingt-dix entreprises, à travers son Fonds Aga Khan pour le développement économique (Akfed). Établi en Suisse, celui-ci est divisé en pôles : industrie (IPS), tourisme (TPS), aviation, finance, etc.

En Afrique de l’Est, le Kenya est à la fois une place forte pour la communauté et pour Akfed, qui y possède des pans entiers de l’économie : banques et assurances (notamment Diamond Trust Bank), l’usine de conserves Frigoken, l’empire de la presse Nation Media Group (éditeur du Daily Nation, premier quotidien du pays) ou encore la luxueuse chaîne hôtelière Serena.

Difficile à évaluer, son poids économique rend les médias prompts à dépeindre l’Aga Khan en « richissime homme d’affaires », au grand dam de son représentant diplomatique, qui insiste sur la vocation humaniste de l’ensemble de son action, même économique. « C’est un profond bienfaiteur », abonde un avocat d’affaires qui connaît bien l’Akfed.

Si l’Aga Khan est très attaché à l’Afrique de l’Est, il entretient aussi avec l’ouest du continent une relation forte.

« Non seulement les entreprises servent à financer les œuvres, mais remarquez qu’ils ont beaucoup fait en Afrique de l’Ouest, où il n’y avait pas un seul ismaélien à leur arrivée. Ils y ont été à la fois des pionniers de la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE) et de la private equity, à une époque où ni l’une ni l’autre n’existaient dans la région. »
Une relation solide avec l’Afrique de l’ouest

Si l’Aga Khan est très attaché à l’Afrique de l’Est, il entretient aussi avec l’ouest du continent une relation forte. Cette dernière naît en 1963, à l’occasion d’un appel à l’aide de Félix Houphouët-Boigny.

Le père de l’indépendance ivoirienne veut une usine à Abidjan pour fabriquer les sacs de jute qu’il doit importer pour transporter le précieux cacao. Il sait que l’Aga Khan possède des participations dans ce domaine au Bangladesh, d’où provient la fibre naturelle utilisée pour produire cet emballage.

Sa vision était d’amener la Côte d’Ivoire à devenir le premier producteur mondial de cacao

Le prince accepte et lance dans la foulée la construction de Filtisac, qui, inauguré deux ans plus tard, sera le premier actif du holding industriel IPS en Afrique.

Par cet investissement, l’Aga Khan entend justement apporter son aide à l’autonomisation des nouvelles nations « en substituant aux importations une industrie locale », racontent avec respect ses collaborateurs.

« Sa vision était d’amener la Côte d’Ivoire à devenir le premier producteur mondial de cacao », confirme d’un hochement de tête le Nigérien Ibrahim Charles Amadou, qui nous reçoit dans son bureau de directeur général de Filtisac, où, sur les murs, des anciennes couvertures de journaux retracent les visites dans les locaux de personnages illustres, depuis le président américain Richard Nixon jusqu’à l’actuelle directrice du FMI, Christine Lagarde.
Akfed prospère dans cette région d’Afrique

Aujourd’hui encore, Filtisac est l’emblème du réseau Aga Khan en Afrique de l’Ouest. Dans le bâtiment principal, les fibres de jute sont toujours triées, lavées, étirées par de gigantesques métiers à tisser puis assemblées en sacs, dans un air saturé de poussières et de bruits.

Malgré son influence, l’imam a essuyé des déconvenues dans les secteurs de l’énergie et du transports aérien.

Mais l’entreprise a aussi su évoluer pour accompagner la diversification de l’économie ivoirienne : au sein du complexe de plusieurs hectares qui s’étale le long de l’autoroute d’Abobo, à Abidjan, on fabrique désormais des emballages en polypropylène et en polyéthylène (stockage du coton, des engrais et de la farine), mais aussi des bouteilles en plastique rigide et des bidons (notamment pour les boissons et l’industrie oléagineuse).

Employant 1 100 permanents et disposant de ses propres infrastructures sociales, Filtisac est une société florissante dont les bénéfices (2,5 milliards de F CFA de résultat net en 2016, soit 3,8 millions d’euros) ont été au fil du temps réinvestis à travers la région pour y créer des filiales ou pour en racheter : EmbalMali au Mali, Fasoplast au Burkina Faso et Cofisac-Fumoa au Sénégal. Un schéma systématique au sein d’Akfed (4,1 milliards de dollars de chiffre d’affaires en 2016).

« Nous sommes une entreprise comme les autres, qui veut faire des profits et développer des projets, mais l’ensemble des dividendes destinés à l’Akfed sont réinvestis, les actionnaires minoritaires étant, eux, rémunérés », détaille l’Ivoirien Mahamadou Sylla, directeur général d’IPS West Africa (380 millions de dollars de chiffre d’affaires en 2016), en recevant Jeune Afrique dans ses locaux ultramodernes situés dans un écrin de verdure à deux pas du fastueux Hôtel Ivoire.

L’Aga Khan va dès lors se focaliser dans cette région sur deux grands domaines. L’agroalimentaire, tout d’abord, considéré comme source d’emplois dans les zones rurales.

Ainsi, en Côte d’Ivoire, épicentre de son action régionale, IPS s’est développé tous azimuts jusque dans les années 1980, profitant des occasions de substitution aux importations autant que des situations de monopoles, rachetant ici la tôle de Pechiney, là une usine de filets de pêche.

« Mais, dans les années 1990, une réflexion a été menée sur la vocation réelle d’IPS, le développement. À partir de là, le portefeuille a été revu de fond en comble, et les filiales ayant une contribution limitée au développement ont été cédées », poursuit l’ancien cadre de Coca-Cola.
Agroalimentaire et l’énergie

L’Aga Khan va dès lors se focaliser dans cette région sur deux grands domaines. L’agroalimentaire, tout d’abord, considéré comme source d’emplois dans les zones rurales.

En pleine vague de libéralisations consécutive aux programmes d’ajustements structurels du FMI en Afrique, l’Akfed s’implante dans le sucre (Sosuco, au Burkina), le coton (Ivoire Coton, puis Faso Coton), l’huile de palme (avec Oleatech, qui fermera rapidement ses portes) et plus récemment l’anacarde (Cajou des savanes).

Il mise ensuite sur l’énergie, fondamentale à tout développement économique, notamment avec la centrale d’Azito, opérée en partenariat avec Globeleq, l’une des premières centrales privées du continent, qui représente aujourd’hui 20 % de l’électricité produite en Côte d’Ivoire.

Cette concentration sur deux secteurs est moins marquée en Afrique de l’Est, où le réseau est beaucoup plus diversifié. On y retrouve néanmoins la même préoccupation pour le défi énergétique.

Outre la centrale Kipevu II au Kenya, datant de 2001, l’Aga Khan vient de lancer en avril avec l’institution britannique de développement CDC, une structure d’investissement consacrée aux projets africains d’énergie, dont la première réalisation sera le barrage hydraulique de Ruzizi III, un chantier aussi capital que délicat pour la région des Grands Lacs, située aux frontières du Rwanda, du Burundi et de la RD Congo.

« Nous sommes pour ces pays des partenaires de long terme, et, quelles que soient les crises qu’ils traversent, nous ne les abandonnons pas »

Impliqué dans des secteurs politiquement sensibles, confronté à une compétition économique de plus en plus rude sur le continent avec l’arrivée de nouveaux investisseurs, l’Aga Khan a, malgré son influence, essuyé des déconvenues.

Au début de 2016, la presse relatait que Nation Media Group était menacé de perdre ses subventions publiques pour avoir couvert au Kenya le scandale British American Tobacco, qui impliquait une agence de l’État.

L’une de ses plus rudes aventures africaines fut sûrement celle qu’il a connue avec Énergie du Mali (EDM). Au début des années 2000, il s’allie à Bouygues pour acheter respectivement 21 % et 39 % de ce distributeur d’électricité. Le géant des infrastructures abandonnera l’aventure en raison de conflits avec l’État sur les tarifs appliqués.

Refusant de quitter le navire, IPS rachète en 2005 une partie des parts du groupe français, devenant l’actionnaire de référence d’une société active dans un secteur sensible qu’il maîtrise mal. Une expérience amère, aggravée par la crise qui plonge le Mali dans le chaos à partir de 2012.

« Nous sommes pour ces pays des partenaires de long terme, et, quelles que soient les crises qu’ils traversent, nous ne les abandonnons pas », souligne non sans fierté Ferid Nandjee, assis à la terrasse d’un grand hôtel de l’Ouest parisien.

L’Aga Khan patientera jusqu’aujourd’hui pour se retirer d’EDM (une cession est, selon nos informations, en cours), mais il a retenu la leçon : fini la distribution d’énergie en Afrique.
Échec dans le transport aérien

Même conclusion pour le transport aérien. Fonder une compagnie africaine, comme il l’avait fait en Méditerranée avec Meridiana, située dans son fief sarde d’Olbia, était pourtant le grand rêve de ce passionné d’avions.

Mais ses quatre tentatives dans des compagnies nationales (Air Mali, Air Ouganda, Air Côte d’Ivoire et Air Burkina), qu’il voulait à terme réunir, se sont soldées par autant d’échecs. Un cadre du réseau s’étonne encore que, « après avoir injecté 60 milliards de F CFA dans Air Burkina sans jamais rien récolter », l’Aga Khan ait décidé en mai de céder, presque sans broncher, ses participations à l’État pour 1 franc symbolique.

« Si un membre est banquier d’affaires à New York et qu’Akfed lui demande de venir, il sera là du jour au lendemain »

Akfed est un ovni dans le monde économique. À mi-chemin entre le mécénat, le fonds d’investissement et l’agence de développement.

Pour la plupart des sources que nous avons interrogées, cette dernière est la plus proche de sa philosophie (IFC et la DEG sont d’ailleurs actionnaires d’IPS WA tandis que l’Aga Khan possède quelques parts de Proparco). Mais, si Akfed est capable d’attendre très longtemps un retour sur investissement, il ose aussi des paris plus risqués.

« Le fonds intervient dans des opérations qui n’attirent personne », explique une financière qui a côtoyé ses équipes, saluant « des gens de grande capacité ». Autre singularité, l’imamat est en mesure d’attirer à lui les meilleures compétences de sa communauté.

« Ils sont d’une extrême dureté en affaires ! Ils ont des objectifs de gentils, mais ce ne sont pas vraiment des gentils »

« Si un membre est banquier d’affaires à New York et qu’Akfed lui demande de venir, il sera là du jour au lendemain », s’émerveille un partenaire, qui salue le sérieux et le dévouement des membres de ses équipes. « Ils sont d’une extrême dureté en affaires ! Ils ont des objectifs de gentils, mais ce ne sont pas vraiment des gentils », se remémore de son côté un ancien client, soulignant que rares sont les exemples de défection au sein du réseau, comme l’ancien directeur d’IPS WA, Nizar Hassam, qui a monté sa propre affaire, Envol Afrique, au milieu des années 2000.

Pour certains, tant d’opiniâtreté est presque contre-productif. « Ils ont une telle crainte du chef qu’ils négocient chacun des termes au-delà du raisonnable. Et comme la hiérarchisation est extrême, faire une opération avec eux peut prendre énormément de temps, parfois trop », poursuit un investisseur.

Quelques exemples : le fonds s’est intéressé à Atlantique Telecom (un domaine qu’il connaît en Asie) et à la clinique abidjanaise Pisam (un secteur où Akfed est très présent à l’Est) sans finalement boucler ces investissements.
Passage à vide

D’ailleurs, plusieurs analystes estiment même que le fonds s’est assoupi, particulièrement en Afrique de l’Ouest. « Ils n’y font plus grand-chose depuis quinze ans », regrette une source juridique, croyant savoir que le comité exécutif, essentiellement composé d’ismaéliens, presse le prince de se concentrer sur les pays où vit la communauté.

En cette année de jubilé, une visite du prince dans cette partie du continent serait évidemment interprétée comme un signe

Difficile de décrypter les coulisses de cette structure « très secrète », mais on évoque aussi des rivalités internes ou encore un passage à vide en Côte d’Ivoire sous la présidence de Laurent Gbagbo.

En cette année de jubilé, une visite du prince dans cette partie du continent serait évidemment interprétée comme un signe. D’autant plus que l’Aga Khan pourrait y annoncer un chapelet de projets prometteurs pour la région. Il se murmure notamment qu’un barrage hydraulique est dans les cartons.

Succession en marche ?

À 80 ans, l’homme qui s’apprête à entamer une tournée mondiale dans le cadre du jubilé de diamant de son imamat a plusieurs préoccupations. Sa communauté vit des moments douloureux dans certaines régions, comme la Syrie et l’Afghanistan.

L’Iran, d’où l’Akfed était absent, s’ouvre peu à peu. Par ailleurs, il lui faut aussi désigner son successeur. L’Aga Khan a eu quatre enfants : Zahra, Rahim et Hussain, nés de son premier mariage avec le mannequin Sally Crocker-Poole, puis Aly, né d’une seconde union, avec l’actuelle bégum Inaara. Il est déjà quatre fois grand-père.

En perte de vitesse en Afrique de l’Ouest

Au 181e rang de notre classement des 500 premières entreprises africaines (TOP 500) de 2005, IPS WA y figure désormais en 373e position.

Certes, ce holding d’investissement n’a pas vocation à être l’un de ces « champions » sur le continent, mais il a perdu du terrain dans cet environnement économique, devenu bien plus concurrentiel.
Back to top
View users profile Send private message Visit posters website
mahebubchatur



Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 132

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ismaili Muslims community constitutional social economic entities according to the Ismaili community's entity website AKDN.

This does not include all the other many constitutional entities of and for the benefit and governance of the Ismaili community locally, nationally and globally, such as Ismaili Councils, IIS, ITREBS, Huzur, NCAB, ICAB, LIF, DJI

Link http://www.akdn.org/our-agencies/aga-khan-fund-economic-development/akfed-companies
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
mahebubchatur



Joined: 13 Jan 2014
Posts: 132

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 2:26 am    Post subject: Article in French - a Translation - google Reply with quote

Google translate of Article

The 20 countries Aga Khan will visit is still a secret. The main Diamond Jubilee objectives of the Aga Khan are firstly spiritual guide of the 15 million. Ismaili community, a minority branch of Shiism; secondly That of a Philanthropist, one of the most active on the planet, following the example of computer mogul Bill Gates; And thirdly that of a prolific investor.


" This royalty, His Highness the Aga Khan, without a kingdom is on all fronts.

In six decades, He has built an empire dedicated to the fight against poverty, with a strong presence in West Africa.

Investigation of a man as discreet and as powerful.

He is Imam of Ismaili Muslims , but he is respected and received with the honors reserved to heads of state

The Aga Khan will be welcomed, on the occasion of his sixtieth year of becoming the Imam , as spiritual leader of the Ismailis, in each of the twenty countries He will visit during this year.

The festivities of this diamond jubilee, were launched on July 11 in its French Headquarters of Chantilly, north of Paris. This lead it to travel the world to meet its 15 million faithful followers scattered between their cradle of Central Asia & the four other continents.

The list of countries to be visited is still a secret, but each stage will be an opportunity to fulfill the three missions assigned to it and which he considers to be indivisible:

that of spiritual guide of the Ismaili community, a minority branch of Shiism;

That is a Philanthropist, one of the most active on the planet, following the example of computer mogul Bill Gates; And

finally, that is of a prolific investor.

As in previous jubilees there will be religious processions, social receptions and announcements of projects of tens of millions of dollars.

Ten years ago, on the occasion of his Golden Jubilee, the "prince", as his interlocutors (the faithful preferring "His Highness") designated him, had launched in Uganda the hydraulic dam of Bujagali, on the Lake Victoria, since its inauguration in 2012, the backbone of the country's electricity production.

"This is a special moment for me," Aga Khan said at a banquet held in Kampala this man who speaks English as well as French and Arabic, about the trip he had just completed In East Africa.

This region has "a special significance for the Ismaili community, for the institutions of the Aga Khan network and for me personally, for half a century", he added. A great knowledge of Africa

It was in Kenya that Karim, born in Geneva in 1936, grandson of the previous Aga Khan, Mahomed Shah, spent his childhood. And it was in Tanzania, in Dar es Salaam, that he was against all expectations enthroned forty-ninth Imam of the Ismailis in 1957.

To his surprise, he, the 20-year-old Harvard student, was appointed by the Aga Khan to succeed him, and not, as traditionally wished, his father, Ali.

The latter, according to the French author Yann Kerlau in his book Les Aga Khans, much more attracted by "the lights of Hollywood" (his tumultuous marriage with the American actress Rita Hayworth made for years one of the tabloids)

That by the imamat, did not in fact make figure of ideal candidate.

He has a very good understanding of Africa, Asia of course, but also of the globality of the world

"This decision was a first in one thousand three hundred years of history," says one of our sources. It was the Cold War, the world was jostled, there was the advent of the nuclear threat.

The Aga Khan wanted someone young, registered in the modernity to succeed him. The grandfather did not seem to have been deceived.

For Jean-Michel Severino, who regularly met the Prince during the years 2000 when he was head of the French Development Agency (one of his main partners in Africa), "modernity" is precisely one of the features The most salient of this man, about whom he does not cease to praise: "He is at one and the same time an extremely courteous and well-balanced person, who never boasts, and very intelligent, with very geo-strategic reflection . He has a very good understanding of Africa, Asia of course, but also of the globality of the world, "says the development specialist. He added:

"He is a deep democrat, perhaps because his community, systematically a minority where it lives, needs democracy to get by. "

At the turn of the 1960s, in the midst of euphoria of independence, one of the first decisions of the new Imam was to place development at the heart of its action "
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 4730

PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.wionews.com/photos/aga-khan-the-man-his-foundation-the-colour-of-money-431

For photos, refe to the link please.

30 August 2017

Aga Khan: The man, his foundation & the colour of money

It is believed that the Aga Khan is a direct lineal descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad

Aga Khan: The roots and Indian Connection

It is believed that the Aga Khan is a direct lineal descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad through Muhammad's cousin and son-in-law, Ali, considered the first Imam in Shia Islam, and Ali's wife Fatima az-Zahra, Muhammad’s daughter from his first marriage. The name 'Aga Khan' is used by the Imam of the Nizari Ismailis. According to some historical records, it is an honorific title presented to Hasan Ali Shah (1800–1881), the 46th Imam of Nizari Ismailis, by Persian king Fath-Ali Shah Qajar. (Others)

Aga Khan: The dynasty

However, this fact is contradicted by what the Aga Khan III noted in a famous legal proceeding in India. He, on the other hand, clarified that Aga Khan is not a title but instead a sort of alias or nickname given to the Aga Khan I when he was a young man.

During the end of First Anglo-Afghan War (1841-1842), Hasan Ali Shah gave a helping hand to General Nott in Kandahar Province and to General England in his advance from Sindh to join Nott. He was bestowed upon the status of "Prince" by the British government in India and became the sole religious leader in British India. He was granted a personal gun salute. When Hasan Ali Shah, Aga Khan I, came to Sindh, then in India and now in Pakistan, from Afghanistan, he was welcomed by Mir Nasir Khan of Baluchistan, Pakistan. In 1866, the Aga Khan won a court in the High Court of Bombay, being recognised by the British government as the head of the Khoja community.

In 1887, the Secretary of State for India acting through the Viceroy of India formally recognized the title, "Aga Khan'' (Others)

Save for Later

Aga Khan: Prince Karim

His Highness Shah Karim al-Husayni Aga Khan IV is the 49th hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. He succeeded his grandfather, Aga Khan III, at the age of 20 in 1957. For the first time in the history of the family, the succession was passed to the third generation instead of second. It is said that Karim's father indulged in sports, speed, and women which led to the decision of not making him the Aga Khan IV.

His thoughts when he was crowned Aga Khan IV:
Overnight my whole life changed completely. I woke up with serious responsibilities toward millions of other human beings.
– Imam Shah Karim al-Husayni Aga Khan IV,
(Sports Illustrated Interview, August 10, 1964, NanoWisdoms http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/10341/)

Shah Karim is one of the world’s richest men with an estimated net worth of $800 million. He is also a revered religious figure worldwide.

Similar to his grandfather, he is committed to promote the image of Muslims, bridging the gap and misconceptions about the religion, and giving a greater understanding of the Islam, emphasising in the West.

The Ismaili sect of Shia Islam has roughly 15 million members across the world.

The Harvard Graduate has a degree in Islamic History and is the founder and chairman of the Aga Khan Development Network, an organization dedicated to improve people’s lives in the developing world. Relying largely on donations that flow in from followers, Aga Khan has been able to build schools and hospitals. He has also provided regular funding for administration, new initiatives and other activities. (Others)

Save for Later

Aga Khan: Aga Khan Palace in India

The Aga Khan Palace in Pune was built by Sultam Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III in 1892.

The palace was built in 1892 after a famine to generate employment for the people of the region. So, the roots of this palace are in charity & noble thoughts. It took 5 years and 1000 workers to build it at a cost of Rs 12,00,000/-. Palace is spread across an estate of 19 acres with a built area of 7 acres. (Others)

Save for Later

Aga Khan: Mahatma Gandhi in Aga Khan Palace

The Aga Khan Palace in Pune has great historical significance as Mahatma Gandhi along with his wife Kasturba Gandhi, his secretary Mahadev Desai and Sarojini Naidu were imprisoned in it for a period of two years, towards the end of British rule in India.

In 1969, the palace was donated to India. Today, it possesses Gandhi’s memorial, Kasturba and Desai’s samadhis and archives of photos and portraits of Gandhi during the freedom struggle. (Others)

Save for Later

Aga Khan: Wealth

Forbes magazine lists Aga Khan among the world's ten richest royals with a net worth of $800 million. However, some sources claim that his wealth at around $3 billion.

Most of his wealth comes voluntary cash donations by Ismaili community members. As a part of the religion, followers donate at least 10 per cent of their gross annual income to the spiritual leader.

However, Aga Khan has reportedly been involved in different business ventures, including exclusive luxury hotel chains.

A multi-million-dollar horse-racing and breeding operation is believed to be one of the main sources of the Aga Khan's income beyond donations by his followers. He owns horse-breeding farms in France and Ireland.

Another spectacular instance of the family's wealth is the Hackwood Park--one of Britain's priciest mansions that the residence of Aga Khan's mother.

The mansion is 50 times the size of an average house that boasts of 24 bedrooms and 24 bathrooms.

The exclusive home, built in 1680, spreads over 260 acres of grounds and includes a spectacular botanical garden. It also has a stable with a coach house and four cottages. There is a deer park and an ancient woodland in the house. (Others)
Back to top
View users profile Send private message Visit posters website
Admin



Joined: 06 Jan 2003
Posts: 4730

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://expresso.sapo.pt/sociedade/2017-09-16-Um-deus-na-Terra

Photos below Portuguese text and English version by Google Translate below photos [/b]

Um deus na Terra

16.09.2017 às 9h00


FOTO CHRISTOPHER LITTLE/AKDN
Aga Khan IV descende do profeta Maomé e é o líder espiritual de 15 milhões de fiéis muçulmanos, 10 mil dos quais vivem em Portugal. É um dos homens mais ricos e mais influentes do mundo, o qual tem tentado transformar à sua maneira e à do Islão. Está prestes a estabelecer residência em Lisboa. Será o novo sr. Gulbenkian
Alexandra Carita

Alexandra Carita

É o príncipe Karim Aga Khan IV. Mas chamam-lhe Sua Alteza. O título foi-lhe atribuído por Isabel II, a rainha de Inglaterra, logo depois de Karim, aos 20 anos, assumir o cargo de imã, o 49º imã dos 15 milhões de muçulmanos xiitas ismaelitas. Há cerca de um mês, a 11 de julho, iniciou as celebrações do seu jubileu de diamante e prepara-se para deixar a região de Paris e estabelecer residência em Lisboa.

É um dos homens mais ricos do mundo, dizem as revistas estrangeiras da especialidade, que há pouco tempo situavam a sua fortuna nos quase 14 mil milhões de dólares. Mas é ao mesmo tempo líder espiritual de uma comunidade que doa ao Imamato, que ele próprio gere, cerca de 10 a 12% do que ganha. São milhões e milhões que a Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento (Aga Khan Development Network — AKDN), uma espécie de Nações Unidas privadas, como já foi descrita, põe ao serviço dos fiéis e da sociedade onde se inserem, em mais de 25 países situados maioritariamente na Ásia Central, na África Subsariana, no Médio Oriente, na Europa e na América do Norte.

Com funções múltiplas e muito além da orientação religiosa e da interpretação do Corão, Karim Aga Khan tem a seu cargo a educação cívica da comunidade, que o adula. Significa isso cuidar do seu bem-estar e guiá-los no sentido de criarem os seus próprios meios de subsistência e as suas carreiras com base nessas orientações. “Os meus deveres são bem mais latos do que os do Papa. Ele só tem de se preocupar com o bem-estar espiritual do seu rebanho”, disse um dia. O príncipe Aga Khan encaminha os seus fiéis em termos de educação e saúde, bem como de finança e economia, valores éticos e sociais. Um rol de áreas que a constituição que criou em 1986, ratificada em 1998, descreve com clareza e faz seguir em todo o mundo e em todas as comunidades através de conselhos nacionais. Portugal não é exceção. No país vivem quase 10 mil ismaelitas, sobretudo na zona da Grande Lisboa, e Aga Khan não tem deixado de investir em terras lusas com protocolos assinados em várias áreas, da ciência à cultura, passando pela educação e pela sustentabilidade.

“A assinatura do acordo histórico entre o Imamat Ismaili e a República Portuguesa para estabelecer em Portugal a sua sede é um marco histórico nos nossos 1400 anos de história. Partilhamos com Portugal os valores da tolerância na diversidade de comunidades e culturas e temos um imenso respeito pelo compromisso do país em partilhar conhecimento para a melhoria das comunidades em todo o mundo”, diz Karim Aga Khan ao Expresso.
No Paquistão, em 1970, numa visita a uma escola fundada pelo avô Aga Khan III

No Paquistão, em 1970, numa visita a uma escola fundada pelo avô Aga Khan III

FOTO CUMBER STUDIOS/AKDN

Essa é a razão por que foi aqui, no Palacete Henrique Mendonça (antiga Reitoria da Universidade Nova de Lisboa), que o príncipe decidiu criar a primeira sede física para o Imamato, que sempre funcionou através de um secretariado que acompanha o imã na sua residência mais perene, ultimamente Aiglemont, a 40 quilómetros de Paris. Um castelo luxuoso, como as outras moradias de Sua Alteza — nomeadamente na Sardenha e em Genebra —, que nos seus 40 hectares de terreno vê crescer os puros-sangue mais caros das corridas de cavalos mais prestigiantes do mundo. É a criação destes animais de pedigree, aliás, um negócio nas mãos da família há mais de um século, que oferece a Karim grande parte da sua fortuna pessoal (mas o dinheiro chega-lhe também do ramo imobiliário, que domina em todo o mundo).

São famosos os jockeys do domínio de Chantilly trajados a rigor com as camisas de seda verde e vermelha, as cores do Imamato. Como são famosas as aparições do príncipe no Prix Diane, a corrida anual que marca em França, no mês de junho, o troféu mais apetecido da modalidade. Esse ponto alto europeu das corridas de cavalos acontece num domingo, e esse é um dia sagrado para ver Aga Khan, tão raras que são as suas apresentações públicas mundanas. Sexta-feira passada, dia 1 de setembro, abriu uma exceção e apareceu em público em Almancil, no Algarve, para festejar com o amigo Francisco Pinto Balsemão o seu 80º aniversário.

O príncipe sempre foi alvo do interesse desmedido da imprensa cor de rosa e muito sobre ele se escreveu, tanto sobre a sua predileção por barcos e iates como sobre as suas pretendentes, mulheres e divórcios milionários.

Karim tem quatro filhos de dois casamentos. Em 1968, apaixonou-se pela esbelta Sally Chrichton, uma modelo alta e loira, que conheceu em Gstaad. Casou com ela no ano seguinte, e nasceram três filhos: Zahra, Rahim e Hussain. Os três trabalham hoje na Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento em cargos de relevo, desde a direção do departamento social ao sector ambiental, passando pela gestão do Fundo para o Desenvolvimento Económico. Já com os filhos criados, porém, o casamento terminou. Estávamos no ano de 1994. Logo em 1995, Karim Aga Khan IV voltou a casar, desta vez com a princesa germânica Gabriele zu Leiningen, que depois de uma curta carreira como estrela da pop trabalhava na altura como consultora da UNESCO. Cinco anos mais tarde, em 2000, nascia Aly Muhammad, que não veria os pais juntos durante muito tempo. O divórcio fez correr muita tinta e muito dinheiro e foi capa de imensos tabloides, mas não afastou o príncipe dos amores.
Em Porshniev, no Tajiquistão, em 2008, com membros da comunidade ismaelita

Em Porshniev, no Tajiquistão, em 2008, com membros da comunidade ismaelita

FOTO AKBAR HAKIM/AKDN

“Tomo todo o tipo de precauções quando saio com amigos. Aprendi a não mostrar qualquer tipo de emoção em público. Nunca me sento ao lado de uma mulher a quem a imprensa me quer associar”, disse em tempos numa entrevista. Nessa altura, ainda punha os pés fora de casa. Mas a vida ensinou-o. O correio chegou a ser-lhe violado, os funcionários entrevistados, amigos pessoais tiraram-lhe fotografias na sua própria casa e venderam-nas a revistas interessadas e até foi chantageado por telefone. Hoje e há já muito tempo que não sai. Tem uma vida recatada. Não bebe e não fuma. E dedica todo o seu tempo ao cargo que o avô paterno lhe atribuiu tinha ele 20 anos.

Estudante em Harvard, Karim ansiava por se especializar em História, na vertente de História da Religião Islâmica, em 1957, quando no início de abril recebeu uma curta intimação do avô, já com 79 anos de idade. “Vem ver-me!”, nada mais, nada menos. O jovem voou para perto de Cannes, no sul de França, onde este residia. E só voltou à universidade 18 meses depois, já como Aga Khan IV. Era a primeira vez que a hereditariedade do líder ismaelita saltava uma geração. O avô queria-o perto dele, pois pressentia a morte. Quando o seu testamento foi lido, a 11 de julho, o pânico abateu-se sobre o neto: “Foi um choque”, escreveu mais tarde. “Mas acho difícil que alguém na minha situação estivesse preparado”, adiantou numa entrevista de 2013 à revista “Vanity Fair”. A responsabilidade caía-lhe em cima, e o regresso a Harvard não passou de uma brincadeira. Karim estava fadado para liderar o povo ismaelita, e as suas funções começavam imediatamente, não se compadecendo com cursos ou cadeiras em atraso. Se é que não começaram antes. De abril até às primeiras horas do dia 11 de julho, quando o avô Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan III faleceu, o jovem permaneceu a seu lado, mas nesse dia, assim que o advogado do avô chegou à casa perto do lago Léman para ler o testamento, soube o porquê de a escolha ter recaído sobre ele e não sobre o seu pai Aly.
Com o Presidente Kennedy, na Sala Oval da Casa Branca, em Washington, a 14 de março de 1961

Com o Presidente Kennedy, na Sala Oval da Casa Branca, em Washington, a 14 de março de 1961

FOTO ROBERT KNUDSEN/AKDN

“Foi sempre tradição na nossa família que cada imã escolha o seu sucessor na mais absoluta discrição entre qualquer um dos seus descendentes, sejam eles filhos ou não. De acordo com as grandes alterações do mundo, o que provocou muitas mudanças fundamentais, incluindo a descoberta da ciência atómica, estou convencido de que é do maior interesse para a comunidade ismaelita que eu seja sucedido por um jovem que foi criado e educado nos últimos anos e no centro da nova era e que trará uma nova visão da vida ao seu trabalho.” Assim justificou Aga Kahn III a escolha de Karim. No entanto, dizem as más línguas, o que ele não queria era um playboy no seu lugar.

A expressão pode ser um exagero, mas não deixa de ser várias vezes utilizada em relação a Aly Khan, o pai de Karim. Aly, o segundo filho da quarta mulher de Aga Khan III, a bailarina italiana Theresa Magliano, nascera em Turim em 1911. Tido como um dos mais interessantes e bem parecidos homens da sua geração, conheceu a sua primeira mulher era esta ainda casada. O ano era o de 1933, e ela era Loel Guinness, uma bonita aristocrata inglesa. Conta-se que na noite em que a encontrou pela primeira vez, num jantar dançante em Deauville, lhe segredou ao ouvido se queria casar com ele. O casamento viria a acontecer três anos depois, em maio, na magnífica Paris. Em dezembro desse mesmo ano, 1936, no dia 13, nascia Karim Aga Khan. Não tardaria muito a nascer o seu irmão Amyn, logo em 1937. Até onde reza a história, tudo bem. Mas é no pós-guerra que o galã Aly dá mais que falar. O seu romance com a estrela de Hollywood Rita Hayworth foi o apogeu de uma vida de grandes aventuras. Conheceu-a em 1948, em plena Riviera francesa, tinha esta acabado de se divorciar do cineasta Orson Welles e vinha substituir Pamela Harriman na vida do príncipe. Chegaram a casar, também em maio, a 27, e também em Paris, em 1949, e tiveram uma filha, a princesa Yasmin. Mas não foram felizes para sempre e separaram-se quatro anos mais tarde. E, em 1960, Aly Khan morria num acidente de viação, às portas de Paris.
Com Nelson Mandela, já Presidente da África do Sul, em Moçambique, em agosto de 1998

Com Nelson Mandela, já Presidente da África do Sul, em Moçambique, em agosto de 1998

FOTO GARY OTTE/AKDN

“As minhas responsabilidades religiosas começam a partir de hoje”, declarou Karim a seguir à leitura do testamento, que chegou à Suíça numa caixa fechada enviada pelo Lloyds Bank de Londres. Contudo, nos primeiros sete anos do seu Imamato, ouviu e seguiu os conselhos da esposa do avô, como deixara também escrito Aga Khan III. “Durante a noite, a minha vida mudou completamente. Acordei com responsabilidades sérias para com milhões de seres humanos”, explicou numa entrevista dada em agosto de 1964. E, já em 2013, reconhecia que talvez não estivesse tão confiante assim. Na verdade, o avô “governara” durante 72 anos, ele tinha 20!

Não esqueceu, porém, que Aga Khan III iniciara as suas funções com sete anos apenas, numa Índia completamente britânica, antes de se mudar para a Europa, já depois de ter recebido da Rainha Vitória o mesmo título de Sua Alteza, corria o ano de 1886. Este cidadão britânico, tal como agora o neto, pelejou por melhores condições de vida para a sua comunidade e para os que lhe estavam próximos e não deixou de construir uma enorme rede de hospitais, escolas, bancos, mesquitas. No entanto, foi quando, já no início do século XX, chegou ao Velho Continente que tomou consciência de toda uma outra filosofia de vida, a de um mundo moderno que quis também doar aos seus fiéis. Com uma personalidade fora do comum e uma capacidade intelectual forte, passou a mensagem à sua comunidade. Entre os ismaelitas portugueses, há quem ainda se lembre bem de quando Aga Khan III disse aos seus que deveriam aprender inglês, “era a Europa um continente francófono”, ou quando chamou pela primeira vez a atenção para a igualdade de género. “Se tiverem dois filhos, um homem e uma mulher, e se só puderem dar educação a um deles, privilegiem as mulheres”, relembra Nazim Ahmad, representante diplomático do Imamat Ismaili em Portugal. A ideia era não só fazê-las evoluir geracionalmente de forma rápida como preservar a educação — a mulher como educadora e mãe é a sua principal transmissora. Adorado como ninguém, Aga Khan III viu o seu peso ser-lhe doado em ouro no seu Jubileu de Ouro, em 1936, na cidade de Bombaim, e depois em diamantes e platina, nos jubileus correspondentes.
Com a então primeira-ministra britânica Margaret Thatcher, na inauguração do Centro Ismaili em Londres, em 1985

Com a então primeira-ministra britânica Margaret Thatcher, na inauguração do Centro Ismaili em Londres, em 1985

FOTO DEREK ROWE/AKDN

O mesmo não aconteceu a Karim Aga Khan IV. Mas os seus jubileus têm sido marcados por donativos muitíssimo substanciais para as obras da Rede Aga Khan para o Desenvolvimento, que fundou há mais de cinco décadas. Este ano, em que se iniciam as comemorações do seu Jubileu de Diamante, as somas doadas pelos fiéis não foram contabilizadas, mas estima-se que sejam largas centenas de milhões. “Não se espera que um imã se retire da vida do dia a dia. Pelo contrário, dele é esperado que proteja a sua comunidade e contribua para a melhoria da sua qualidade de vida. Assim, a noção da divisão entre a fé e o mundo é estranha para o Islão. O Imamato não divide mundo e fé. E muito poucos compreendem isso fora do Islão. No Ocidente, os vossos sistemas financeiros são todos construídos segundo essa divisão”, explica o príncipe noutra entrevista, justificando ao mesmo tempo a preocupação constante com o bem-estar dos seus fiéis. A mesma afirmação serve ainda para fundamentar a existência de tanta riqueza e criação dela tanto na AKDN como na vida ativa de cada membro da comunidade, que se esforça sempre por uma vida melhor e menos carenciada.
No Paquistão, com os habitantes de Jaglot, perto de Gilgit, em maio de 1983

No Paquistão, com os habitantes de Jaglot, perto de Gilgit, em maio de 1983

FOTO CHRISTOPHER LITTLE/AKDN

Todas as diretrizes de Sua Alteza, de resto, vão nesse sentido. Se até 1995 os objetivos eram os de obter uma educação superior para o maior número possível de ismaelitas, hoje os mesmos objetivos, no que respeita ao campo educacional, são os de obter ensino superior de excelência para todos. Não é por acaso que Aga Khan tem vindo a criar as suas próprias instituições, desde as aAcademias às universidades (Universidade Aga Khan e Universidade da Ásia Central), abertas a toda a sociedade. Além delas, porém, uma nova diretriz toma conta das preocupações do príncipe: a educação parental, ou seja, aquela que tem início no ventre e se prolonga até aos 5 anos. É nessa idade que as crianças recebem mais estímulos intelectuais, cognitivos e motores, tornando-se essencial no seu desenvolvimento. Outra das suas prioridades é neste momento uma chamada de atenção para a saúde no campo das doenças psiquiátricas, neurológicas e oncológicas, além da normal medição dos parâmetros de saúde que sugere a todos os fiéis. Esta é só uma amostra do tipo de normas que Sua Alteza dita, muitas vezes em campanhas de sensibilização, mas que não deixam de ser levadas à letra. Já num raio de ação vasto, as prerrogativas para os próximos 10 anos incluem ainda o combate à pobreza e a mobilização dos jovens para a cidadania (construtiva, ativa e consciente). Para que se tenha uma ideia da precisão destas orientações, fique a saber-se que são impressos manuais escolares em Londres, no Instituto de Estudos Ismailis, que estabelecem os currículos muito bem fundamentados academicamente, depois traduzidos nas várias línguas das comunidades e que significam uma estandardização perfeita da comunidade a nível mundial. Em Portugal, decorrem atualmente, por exemplo, cursos de orientação de carreiras para alunos do 8º ano. É-lhes ensinado até como poupar para o acesso a escolas de nível elevado, onde as propinas são caras. A ideia é que nem financeiramente lhes esteja limitado o acesso.
Na Muralha da China, em outubro de 1981

Na Muralha da China, em outubro de 1981

FOTO GARY OTTE/AKDN

No entanto, Aga Khan IV trabalha diariamente a uma esfera global. O seu lema é o do pluralismo de culturas, credos e ideologias, e acredita que, aplicando estas noções básicas de ética, a sociedade pode evoluir, ajudando-se mutuamente. Acredita na solidariedade e na cultura do voluntariado. É nessa perspetiva que cria a AKDN, a operar em 30 países diferentes e empregando mais de 80 mil pessoas. Cinco centrais elétricas, companhias aéreas, empresas farmacêuticas, bancos, seguradoras, cadeias de hotéis de luxo, empresas de comunicação perfazem uma centena de empresas detidas pela Rede, que utiliza os seus lucros — cerca de 3,5 mil milhões de euros anuais — em benefícios das populações nos domínios do desenvolvimento social e económico e também cultural. Em pratos limpos, isto significa a criação e manutenção de fundos de crédito, de escolas e hospitais e ainda muitos postos de trabalho e micro/macroeconomias em países tão díspares como o Paquistão e o Afeganistão, onde ofereceram escolaridade às mulheres, por exemplo, até à Tanzânia, ao Mali, ao Burkina Faso, ao Uganda ou à Síria, à Índia, à Malásia e a Moçambique.
Com o Presidente Cavaco Silva, em junho de 2014

Com o Presidente Cavaco Silva, em junho de 2014

FOTO JOSÉ CARIA/AKDN

Karim Aga Khan recusa, porém, o epíteto de filantropo ou de praticante da caridade. Para o 49º imã, aquilo que faz é parte integrante do seu mandato e da sua responsabilidade de melhorar a qualidade de vida de todos os seus semelhantes de acordo com a ética do Islão. Pode parecer estranho ou ser de difícil compreensão para um ocidental a junção de dois mundos tão distintos: o espiritual e o material. É por isso que chamam a Sua Alteza com frequência capitalista crente. Ele explica-se de outra forma: “Todos nós já vimos exemplos da criatura mais maravilhosa de Deus, a pessoa, seja numa posição governamental, nos negócios ou numa agência de desenvolvimento privada, inspirada a contribuir generosamente de si próprio, a ir além dos requisitos mecânicos de uma tarefa. Tais homens e mulheres, remunerados ou não, expressam o espírito voluntário, literalmente a vontade de criar um produto melhor, uma clínica mais solidária e eficaz. O seu espírito, gerando novas ideias, resistindo ao desânimo e exigindo resultados, anima o coração de toda a sociedade eficaz.” É esse o seu credo, a sua crença mais profunda e a sua interpretação do Islão.

Um Islão muito especial. Aga Khan IV, o imã hereditário dos muçulmanos xiitas ismaelitas, é descendente direto do profeta Maomé, o último profeta enviado por Deus à Humanidade e aquele que revelou o Sagrado Alcorão. Acreditam os xiitas ismaelitas que, depois da morte de Maomé, Ali, o seu primo e genro, se tornou o primeiro imã, o primeiro guia espiritual da comunidade muçulmana, e que essa orientação hereditária continua através dos tempos. Ao longo de 14 séculos de história, têm assim seguido os imãs hereditários descendentes de Ali e de Fátima, filha do profeta Maomé.

Nessa qualidade, Karim calcorreia o mundo praticamente de lés a lés. Encontra-se com altos dignitários, chefes de Estado, líderes religiosos, políticos, embaixadores, homens de negócios, mas também gente humilde, carenciada, professores, médicos, populações inteiras... Nas reuniões constantes, dizem, é sempre um diplomata. Um diplomata no discurso mas um soberano nas decisões, conseguindo levar a sua avante em praticamente todas as circunstâncias, afiançam os que com ele têm trabalhado. Aga Khan participa ativamente em todas as iniciativas da AKDN, e não há embaixador seu que não seja por si nomeado, desde os seus mais próximos colaboradores aos “ministros” tutelares de cada comunidade, nomeados por três anos para levar a cabo as suas orientações em cada nação. Escolhe os terrenos para a construção das escolas, dos centros ismaelitas (seis em todo o mundo, sendo o de Lisboa o terceiro a ser criado), dos hospitais, das creches, dos museus, de tudo... Designa os arquitetos, acompanha a obra, de sapatos sempre — as galochas não lhe assentam bem, acredita, conta um colaborador seu. E talvez seja por isso que as solas dos sapatos se gastam literalmente até que lhe chamem a atenção para trocar de calçado, como relata a sua irmã. Ou talvez seja pela falta de tempo.
Cerimónia. Sua Alteza, Aga Khan, dirige-se aos membros da comunidade ismaelita no vale de Bartang, no Tajiquistão, a 25 de setembro de 1998

Cerimónia. Sua Alteza, Aga Khan, dirige-se aos membros da comunidade ismaelita no vale de Bartang, no Tajiquistão, a 25 de setembro de 1998

FOTO ZAHUR RAMJI/ AKDN

Sua Alteza não para um instante. Verdadeiro workaholic, vive praticamente dentro do seu avião privado, que comprou para economizar viagens e tempo — voa entre 450 a 600 horas por ano, o equivalente a dois meses de trabalho. Com ele vai muito pouca gente: dois assistentes e uma secretária chegam-lhe para fazer todo o trabalho. “Desde que deixei Harvard que viajo todos os anos pela comunidade espalhada pelo mundo. Quatro ou cinco viagens às populações, dependendo de onde há mais problemas e da urgência de eu lá estar ou não. Geralmente, são visitas a escolas e a hospitais, a centros desportivos ou a mesquitas, durante a manhã, e reuniões e encontros com líderes para planear o desenvolvimento futuro da comunidade, mais tarde. E devo dizer que estar ali por inteiro é muito, muito pesado, até para quem acompanha este tipo de digressões”, explicava numa entrevista de 1970. Vinte anos depois, em 1994, a sua vida não tinha mudado, afirmava ao “Paris Match”. Continuava a levantar-se às 6h da manhã e a trabalhar praticamente sozinho até às 10h. Depois, até ao meio-dia fazia o ponto da situação com o seu secretariado, e as reuniões começavam. Almoçava, e o ritmo mantinha-se intenso, prolongando-se muitas vezes noite dentro. Nessa altura, ainda se queixava de não poder sair para visitar amigos à noite, devido ao trabalho que o esperava no dia seguinte, logo cedo. Hoje, aos 80 anos de idade, não. A sua agenda continua lotada e ele a não delegar muita coisa nos seus colaboradores, mas queixas sobre falta de tempo livre não há. Nem sobre falta de nada.

De facto, a Karim Aga Khan IV não lhe falta nada. A sumptuosidade e o luxo conhece-os de cor. Trata por tu os bens materiais que quiser. No entanto, humilde por natureza, como conta o seu embaixador em Portugal, é mesmo conhecido entre os seus como forreta. E desde sempre. É o seu colega de quarto de Harvard o primeiro a falar, mas seguem-se-lhe a mãe, a irmã e os amigos. Não compra nada, dizem, nem um par de sapatos, nem um fato novo, só gravatas, todas iguais. E se tivesse, ou pudesse, deslocar-se sozinho, escolheria os transportes públicos e pouparia no carro, no seguro e na gasolina.

Não só de pão vive o homem, talvez respondesse se não fosse muçulmano. A verdade é que, introspetivo, Aga Khan carrega com ele um fardo que nunca fez transparecer, pesada herança e destino traçado, um mundo de gente que o segue e um novo mundo a construir. O que tem feito sempre e sempre lhe foi reconhecido.

Os milhões de Aga Khan em Portugal

LISBOA. O 49º imã escolheu Portugal para instalar a sede do seu Imamato e Lisboa para residir


FOTO AKDN

“Os olhos do mundo islâmico estão em Portugal. O país passou uma mensagem de pluralismo cultural e de abertura social única. O impacto vai ser enorme. A começar pelo investimento, que nos últimos 17/18 meses já andou na ordem dos milhões de euros só no ramo imobiliário e que pode chegar a valores astronómicos.” É assim que os representantes da comunidade ismaelita portuguesa reagem ao estabelecimento da sede do Imamato em Lisboa. Nazim Ahmad, embaixador do Imamato, Rahim Kassam, diretor executivo, Rahim Firozali, presidente do Conselho Nacional, e Karim Merali, administrador da Fundação Aga Khan Portugal, acreditam que o sinal dado pela República Portuguesa vai ao encontro da “ética cosmopolita” defendida pelo seu imã, Sua Alteza, o príncipe Karim Aga Khan IV. E não têm dúvidas de que o país vai estar no centro do mundo, depois de mais de quatro décadas no coração do seu líder. O anúncio foi feito em junho de 2015, logo depois de assinado um acordo com a República Portuguesa para a instalação da sede do Imamat Ismaili, e desde aí as expectativas são muitas, mas a emoção é ainda maior. Os ismaelitas portugueses olham para o acontecimento com júbilo e quase agradecem por viverem em solo nacional.

Foi o 25 de Abril que trouxe para Portugal a esmagadora maioria desses ismaelitas, hoje entre 8 a 10 mil no total da população portuguesa. E com eles recaiu sobre o país a atenção de Sua Alteza, o príncipe Aga Khan, que em 1983 fazia abrir em Lisboa uma agência da Fundação Aga Khan. Situada na Lapa, dedicou-se desde logo ao desenvolvimento social e à inclusão económica da população mais vulnerável e mais carenciada. A sua ação ao longo dos anos, contudo, especializou-se no apoio à educação e no desenvolvimento da infância, bem como no suporte do bem-estar da classe sénior. Mas desde 2004 o Programa Comunitário Urbano K’Cidade tem implementado, na Grande Lisboa, processos de trabalho que garantem a sustentabilidade das comunidades a longo prazo. Em 1996, a ligação da Fundação Aga Khan a Portugal estreitou laços com a constituição da mesma como uma fundação portuguesa por decreto-lei. Na mesma data, a construção do Centro Ismaili, nas Laranjeiras, também em Lisboa, trouxe por várias vezes Sua Alteza ao país. Foi Aga Khan IV quem escolheu o terreno onde este haveria de crescer e quem ditou a sua arquitetura. Como é ele quem nomeia os ministros que ali se reúnem em Conselho Nacional e que gerem e determinam as atividades e prioridades da comunidade ismaelita portuguesa. De resto, as atividades no país operam no âmbito dos acordos estabelecidos entre o Imamat e Portugal, em particular o Protocolo de Cooperação com o Governo de Portugal, assinado em 2005, o Memorando de Entendimento com o Ministério dos Negócios Estrangeiros, de 2008, o Acordo Internacional com a República Portuguesa, de 2009, e o Acordo com a República Portuguesa para o Estabelecimento da Sede do Imamat Ismaili em Portugal, em 2015.

“Em Portugal, sempre me senti em casa. Agora e em especial desde a assinatura, em 2015, de um acordo histórico entre o Imamat Ismaili e a República Portuguesa para o estabelecimento do acordo de sede, um marco importante nos 1400 anos de história do Imamat Ismaili. É o culminar da nossa relação longa e profunda em Portugal — uma relação que agora será ainda mais aprofundada”, diz Aga Khan IV no seu discurso de doutoramento honoris causa, que recebeu na Universidade Nova de Lisboa no passado dia 20 de julho. Esse aprofundamento da relação já começou com a assinatura do acordo de cooperação com o Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Educação Superior, no valor de 10 milhões de euros, em maio do ano passado, com a doação de 200 mil euros ao Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga para a aquisição do quadro de Domingos Sequeira “Adoração dos Magos”, ou com a contribuição de 500 mil euros para as vítimas do incêndio de Pedrógão Grande. Haverá muito mais, nomeadamente o investimento de 10 milhões de euros na criação de uma Academia Aga Khan na área da Grande Lisboa, cuja compra do terreno para a sua construção está por um fio. O acordo com a Câmara Municipal de Cascais para estabelecer a academia em Birre foi rompido à última hora. Os terrenos em causa estavam protegidos pelo Plano Diretor Municipal (eram terrenos agrícolas), mas, tendo em conta o propósito da fundação, a autarquia avançou com uma alteração ao PDM. O município de Cascais, a fundação Aga Khan e dono do terreno, o fundo imobiliário Lusofundo, chegaram mesmo a assinar um memorando de entendimento em 2014. Só que pelo caminho a fundação recuou na ideia. O proprietário do terreno não. A fundação Aga Khan declara, no entanto, que a “desistência ficou a dever-se ao facto de, a dada altura do processo, se ter apercebido de que uma parte das forças vivas locais não apoiava qualquer tipo de construção naquele local”. Também ainda por conhecer está a residência do príncipe em Lisboa. Das várias hipóteses que já lhe foram apresentadas, falta-lhe escolher a que mais lhe agrada. Dinheiro não é problema, como não foi para comprar o Palacete Henrique Mendonça (antiga Reitoria da Universidade Nova de Lisboa), onde se vai instalar a sede, por 12 milhões de euros.

“O acordo para o estabelecimento da sede do Imamat Ismaili em Portugal não embaraça o Governo português e não embaraça o imã. É como se diz na gíria um win win, ou seja, é extraordinariamente bom para o Estado e muito bom para o Imamat”, diz ao Expresso Nazim Ahmad, que acompanhou as negociações desde o início. “O entendimento foi muito franco e aberto, tudo decorreu com transparência, frontalidade e amizade”, avança ainda. “A consciência social e ética de Sua Alteza contribuiu para que assim fosse. Se não fosse um bom acordo para Portugal, o acordo não se faria. Aga Khan tem sempre em conta o que o país com quem negoceia vai beneficiar”, conclui Nazim. E se Portugal só tem a ganhar com a cooperação com o Imamat Ismaili, quer no que respeita a investimentos financeiros e criação de emprego quer no que se relaciona com a sua posição geoestratégica no quadro da política mundial, também Aga Khan tem muito a beneficiar com este acordo irrevogável nos próximos 25 anos, nomeadamente ao nível da isenção de impostos. Por exemplo, os rendimentos dos donativos oferecidos ao Imamat não pagam impostos, a remuneração do imã e dos altos funcionários do Imamat idem, os rendimentos com origem no estrangeiro também não. O Imamat e Aga Khan podem comprar e vender imóveis sem pagar IMI, IMT ou selo, desde que ligados às funções diplomáticas, como de resto acontece com a Igreja Católica; mas também podem transacionar carros, barcos e aviões sem pagar impostos sobre a compra, propriedade, registo, utilização ou venda. Com benefícios maiores do que os previstos na Lei da Liberdade Religiosa ao nível dos atributos aos Estados estrangeiros e aos seus corpos diplomáticos, que terão imunidade judicial (Imamat, imã, altos funcionários) e outras facilidades necessárias ao desempenho das suas funções, tais como tratamento cerimonial, residências com direito a inviolabilidade e proteção. Ainda em troca, o Imamat compromete-se a apoiar ativamente os esforços do Estado para melhorar a qualidade de vida de todos aqueles que vivem em Portugal. / A.C.








Google Translate

Society
A god on earth

16.09.2017 at 09.00

PHOTO CHRISTOPHER LITTLE / AKDN

Aga Khan IV descends from the Prophet Muhammad and is the spiritual leader of 15 million Muslim believers, 10,000 of whom live in Portugal. He is one of the richest and most influential men in the world, which he has tried to transform in his own way and that of Islam. He is about to establish his residence in Lisbon. It will be the new mr. Gulbenkian
Alexandra Carita

Alexandra Carita

It is Prince Karim Aga Khan IV. But they call it Your Highness. The title was given to her by Elizabeth II, Queen of England, shortly after Karim, at the age of 20, assumed the position of Imam, the 49th Imam of the 15 million Ismaili Shi'ite Muslims. About a month ago, on July 11, he began celebrating his diamond jubilee and prepared to leave the region of Paris and settle in Lisbon.

He is one of the richest men in the world, according to foreign trade journals, which recently put his fortune at nearly $ 14 billion. But he is at the same time the spiritual leader of a community that gives to the Imamate, which he himself manages, about 10 to 12% of what he earns. The Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), a kind of private United Nations, as it has been described, puts millions and millions at the service of the faithful and the society in which they are inserted in more than 25 countries mostly in Central Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Europe and North America.

With multiple functions and far beyond the religious orientation and interpretation of the Koran, Karim Aga Khan is in charge of the civic education of the community, which flatters him. It means taking care of their well-being and guiding them to create their own livelihoods and careers based on those guidelines. "My duties are much wider than those of the Pope. He only has to worry about the spiritual well-being of his flock, "he said one day. Prince Aga Khan directs his faithful in terms of education and health, as well as finance and economics, ethical and social values. A list of areas that the constitution it created in 1986, ratified in 1998, clearly describes and follows throughout the world and in all communities through national councils. Portugal is no exception. Almost 10 thousand Ismailis live in the country, especially in Greater Lisbon, and Aga Khan has not stopped investing in Portuguese land with protocols signed in several areas, from science to culture, through education and sustainability.

"The signing of the historic agreement between Imamat Ismaili and the Portuguese Republic to establish its headquarters in Portugal is a historical milestone in our 1400 years of history. We share with Portugal the values ​​of tolerance in the diversity of communities and cultures and we have an immense respect for the country's commitment to share knowledge for the improvement of communities around the world, "says Karim Aga Khan to Expresso.
In Pakistan in 1970, on a visit to a school founded by grandfather Aga Khan III

In Pakistan in 1970, on a visit to a school founded by grandfather Aga Khan III

PHOTO CUMBER STUDIOS / AKDN

That is why the prince decided to create the first physical seat for the Imamate, which always functioned through a secretariat that accompanies the imam at his residence in the Palacete Henrique Mendonça (former rectory of the New University of Lisbon) more perennial, lately Aiglemont, 40 kilometers from Paris. A luxurious castle, like the other dwellings of His Highness - notably in Sardinia and Geneva - which on its 40 hectares of land sees the most expensive purebloods of the most prestigious horse races in the world. It is the creation of these pedigree animals, moreover, a business in the hands of the family for over a century, which offers Karim a large part of his personal fortune (but the money also comes to him from real estate, which dominates the world ).

The jockeys of the Chantilly domain are famously dressed in green and red silk shirts, the Imamato colors. How famous are the appearances of the prince at the Prix Diane, the annual race that marks the most sought-after trophy in France in June. This high point of European horse racing takes place on a Sunday, and this is a sacred day to see Aga Khan, so rare are his worldly public performances. Last Friday, September 1, he made an exception and appeared in public in Almancil, Algarve, to celebrate with his friend Francisco Pinto Balsemão his 80th birthday.

The prince has always been the subject of the overwhelming interest of the pink press and much of it has been written about both his predilection for boats and yachts and his suitors, women, and millionaire divorces.

Karim has four children from two marriages. In 1968, she fell in love with the slender Sally Chrichton, a tall blond model who knows
Back to top
View users profile Send private message Visit posters website
kmaherali



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 15388

PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE BLOG
The Aga Khan Deserves The Nobel Peace Prize
There has been a distilled media narrative involving partisan politics when mentioning him. Lost in all the noise is his incredible humanitarian legacy.


The Global Center for Pluralism — a joint initiative by the government of Canada and the Aga Khan — hosted its inaugural awards gala in Ottawa on Wednesday. The Aga Khan presided over the ceremonies along with former prime minister Joe Clark and Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin. This event underscored the Aga Khan's lifelong belief that "pluralism is no longer simply an asset or a prerequisite for progress and development, it is vital to our existence."

Recently, there has been a distilled Canadian media narrative involving partisan politics when mentioning the Aga Khan. Lost in all the noise is his incredible humanitarian legacy, which is especially noteworthy given the occasion of his Diamond Jubilee. For the past 60 years, the Aga Khan has been a tireless champion of peace, diversity and pluralism. When we take into account the immense contributions of his international work, it is clear that he is one of the most deserving individuals of the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Aga Khan became the spiritual leader of the Ismailis on July 11, 1957. At that time, he was an undergraduate at Harvard and was chosen to succeed his grandfather as the 49th hereditary Imam of the Ismailis — an office with a history spanning more than 1400 years. Ever since the mantle of leadership was passed to him, he has provided secular and spiritual guidance to his followers, in addition to working towards the uplift of peoples around the world regardless of ethnicity, creed or religion.
-Advertisement-


x


CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS
Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) meets with the Aga Khan, spiritual leader of Ismaili Muslims, in Trudeau's office on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, May 17, 2016.
The Aga Khan's legacy of humanitarian service is deeply personal for me and my wife. As Ismailis, both our families were direct beneficiaries of the Aga Khan's relationship with Canada and former prime minister Pierre Trudeau. In 1972, Idi Amin, then-president of Uganda, declared a 90-day ultimatum for the expulsion of Asians from Uganda, including Ismailis. It was the Aga Khan who was able to call on his friend to ensure the safeguard of thousands of refugees, many of whom settled in Canada.

The Aga Khan has also played a vital role in other conflict areas including Afghanistan and Syria. Since 2002, through the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) and its partners, nearly US$750 million has been contributed to the reconstruction of Afghanistan. This investment has helped to produce large-scale rural development, education, finance and technology services including Roshan, the largest telecommunications service in the country. The Aga Khan has also been an important counterweight to extremism in the region, debunking the myth that moderate Muslims need to do more.

In Syria, the Aga Khan has been extremely active in an attempt to help broker peace during a time of civil unrest. This has included meeting with important stakeholders, including Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, and former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, who conveyed that he was "deeply appreciative for our friendship and for your efforts for peace around the world." Former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson best described the influence of the Aga Khan when suggesting that he is "perhaps the only person in the world to whom everyone listens."

As a physician with a background in public health, I have

He has spent his entire life in the service of humanity, and particularly, for those most in need.
a keen interest in medical development efforts around the world. Along with institutions including the World Health Organization and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS) — an agency of the AKDN — is arguably one of the world's most impactful medical organizations. The numbers speak for themselves.

The AKHS provides medical care for 1.8 million patients annually across 200 health centres — including 14 hospitals — in East Africa, Central and South Asia. It established the first comprehensive heart and cancer centre in sub-Saharan Africa while running the only hospital in the region to be accredited by the Joint Commission International. The network is also responsible for the creation of the first university nursing program in Pakistan that has trained more than 6,000 nurses. As a third-year medical student, I spent a month at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi. While impressed by the incredibly modern medical campus, it was the institution's culture of ambition, commitment to best practices and its focus on excellence that really stood out.

Critically, all of this has been possible because of the Aga Khan's vision for a better world. He has spent his entire life in the service of humanity, and particularly, for those most in need. His promotion of the values of inclusion, peace, civil society and human dignity were recognized when the Harper government made the Aga Khan an honorary Canadian citizen. As the former prime minister described, "His Highness's lifelong advocacy for humanitarianism, pluralism and tolerance has gone far beyond words." Canada has been an incredible supporter of the Aga Khan's global work, including partnerships in the areas of early childhood education, health care and disaster relief. This is a humanitarian legacy that Canada has played a significant role in creating, and one that it should be immensely proud of.

On the auspicious occasion of the Aga Khan's Diamond Jubilee, what better way to commemorate this amazing milestone than by nominating him for the richly deserved Nobel Peace Prize. Valuing the importance of harmony, above all else, the Aga Khan remarked: "Any leader of any global community hopes and prays for one thing — peace."

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/adam-kassam/the-aga-khan-deserves-the-nobel-peace-prize_a_23269914/
Back to top
View users profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.ismaili.net Forum Index -> Imamat/ Noorani Family Activities All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group




Fatal error: Call to a member function Execute() on a non-object in /home/heritage/web/webdocs/html/includes/pnSession.php on line 400