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Univ. of Ottawa Doctorate news 13 january 2012

 
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2012 7:16 pm    Post subject: Univ. of Ottawa Doctorate news 13 january 2012 Reply with quote

10 Photos and 1 video on:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Wanted+make+unstable+democracies+work+Khan+says/5993493/story.html
-------------------------------------------


Photograph by: Jean Levac, Ottawa Citizen

Extract only here. For ull article refer to the link

Wanted: A way to make unstable democracies work, Aga Khan says

Imam of the world’s Shia Ismaili Muslims picks up honorary doctorate from University of Ottawa

By Don Butler, The Ottawa Citizen January 13, 2012 10:07 PM

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Wanted+make+unstable+democracies+work+Khan+says/5993493/story.html#ixzz1jPGgpVOv

OTTAWA — The list of honours the Aga Khan has received during his illustrious lifetime consumes three pages in Wikipedia. In this country alone, he’s been named an honorary Companion of the Order of Canada and granted honorary Canadian citizenship — just the fifth person, and first Muslim, ever so honoured.

He also has 19 honorary degrees from universities around the world, including five from Canadian institutions. The latest came Friday from the University of Ottawa, which awarded him an honorary doctorate for his service to humanity.

The 75-year-old hereditary Imam of the world’s Shia Ismaili Muslims, who assumed the position in 1957, has earned the recognition.

An unstinting advocate of the virtues of pluralism, he’s the founder and chairman of the Aga Khan Development Network, now one of the world’s largest private development networks.

“His work has bettered the lives of people in communities around the world,” said Huguette Labelle, who awarded the honourary degree Friday as her last official function as chancellor of the University of Ottawa.

Allan Rock, the university’s president, said the Aga Khan — who is properly addressed as His Highness — speaks directly to the goodness in all people. By his words and actions, Rock said, he has demonstrated that “there are no divisions among us if our desire truly is to create a better world.”

In a reference to Friday’s snowstorm, Rock also confided that the Aga Khan had told him he was a great fan of skiing, “but not necessarily on the sidewalks.”

When he rose to speak Friday after receiving his degree, the Aga Khan focused on a single topic: the difficulty of establishing workable constitutional systems in developing countries with limited experience with democracy.

He said the Arab Spring had brought special attention to this challenge, illustrating that “it is easier to rally people to opposition to a particular government than to forge agreement about new governing processes.”

Many developed nations, he observed, have developed “two-pronged political structures,” where one party forms a government while the other constitutes the opposition. “This arrangement can foster greater accountability and even a certain stability.”

But he said he was “increasingly skeptical about the emergence of such constructs in many developing countries.” Rather, he expects coalition government to become the norm in many African, Asian and Middle Eastern countries.

“The difficulty is, however, that multi-party coalitions can be intrinsically undisciplined, with their differing agendas, and often unstable,” he said. Accountability is often blurred and transparency is discouraged.

“The high level of political instability and failure around the world illustrates the need for creative new thinking about this particularly demanding form of democracy,” he said. “The alternative is a world characterized by significant numbers of unstable states. It is a scenario to be avoided.”

The University of Ottawa can “make a special contribution” to this discussion, he said, particularly since it’s global effectiveness is reinforced by the high regard in which Canada is held internationally.

“A country’s standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognized by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others,” he said. “In this context, Canada has truly become a great world power.”

dbutler@ottawacitizen.com
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Wanted+make+unstable+democracies+work+Khan+says/5993493/story.html#ixzz1jPGyZkw6


Last edited by Admin on Fri Jan 13, 2012 7:34 pm, edited 2 times in total
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2012 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://blogs.theprovince.com/2012/01/13/the-aga-khan-emerging-democracies-will-require-the-intellectual-support-of-nations-like-canada/

The Province>Blogs >Opinion
The Aga Khan: Emerging democracies will require the intellectual support of nations like Canada

January 13, 2012. 3:52 pm • Section: Opinion

His Highness, The Aga Khan, was given an honourary doctorate Friday by the University of Ottawa. This is the speech he delivered at the ceremony.

There are many topics of mutual interest that I could talk about today. But I have picked just one. In my eyes it is important, and I understand that it is also high among your priorities. I refer to the field of governance and public policy, specifically to the difficulty of establishing workable constitutional systems, especially in countries with less experience in democratic governance.

As you know, my own interests in the last 50 years as Imam of the Ismaili community have been primarily focused on Africa, South Asia, Central Asia and the Middle-East and on improving the quality of life for the people who live there. The more I think about this matter, the more I am persuaded that one of the critical barriers to progress is the way in which governing processes occur.

The University of Ottawa has a long tradition of sharing internationally in the hard work of intellectual inquiry. Canada’s Governor-General recently referred to this process as “the Diplomacy of Knowledge.” And it seems to me that questions of constitutional governance in the developing world deserve a particularly high place on that agenda.

The so-called Arab Spring has brought special attention to this challenge, illustrating that it is easier to rally people in opposition to a particular government than to forge agreement about new governing processes. But while this pattern has recently been more dramatically evident, it has been a reality for a very, very long time.

In my life, the two moments that contributed most dramatically to this condition were the fall of the British and French colonial empires after the Second World War and the disintegration of the Soviet Union and its Eastern European empire two decades ago. The process continues today as developing nations re-examine — sometimes peacefully, sometimes violently — how they are governed.

In some cases, and I think here of Kenya’s very new constitution, power has been diffused in response, no doubt, to pressures from ethnic, economic, religious and other forces. One risk of decentralization is that it can place more decision-making power into the hands of communities that have had less access to education and governing experience, and less exposure to national and global issues. Perhaps this is why in some cases the trend has been to consolidate governing authority, such as in Afghanistan with the aim of overcoming inertia and inefficiency as well as fragmented and provincial outlooks.

The history of constitutions can be seen as an oscillation between the two poles of centralization and diffusion, with new concentrations of power often amplifying the temptation to abuse, while new dispersions of power are often associated with stagnation, paralysis and even more opportunities for corruption.

Arrangements that effectively balance power, through a federalist approach, for example, are elusive. What is critical is that constitutional arrangements should respect inherited traditions, ensure fairness to minority communities, respond to rural as well as urban concerns and underwrite equitable opportunity for a better life. Reconciling the global and the local, the urban and the rural, the regional and the national is a formidable challenge, one that calls for the best of our intellectual energies and consistent fine-tuning over time.

There is a second question related to the experience of fledgling and often failing democracies. In much of the developed world we have seen the emergence of two-pronged political structures, where one party forms a government and the other constitutes the opposition. This arrangement can foster greater accountability and even a certain stability. But I am increasingly skeptical about the emergence of such constructs. To the contrary, I suspect that a continuing multiplicity of widely differentiated parties will mean that some form of coalition government will become the norm. This will especially be the case in societies that are multi-cultural, multi-religious or struggling to accommodate secular and religious political forces.

The difficulty is that multi-party coalitions can be intrinsically undisciplined, with their differing agendas, and are often unstable. In such situations, the threat of defection can be highly destabilizing, while accountability is often blurred and transparency is discouraged. Yet, coalition governance is now becoming a familiar form of government in many countries of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The broader the array of parties, the greater the risk that they will be based on personalities or narrow parochial identities, rather than a broadly-recognized, predictable point of view.

There is certainly no straightforward, universal formula to apply in such situations. We must not naively assume that what has worked in some parts of the western world, for example, will also work in less developed contexts. Different places, different histories require quite different approaches.

The questions raised by coalition governance are not easy ones either in the developing world or the developed world. What should be the rules under which parties and other governing entities are put together? How can we best find the glue that will hold them together, such as joint commitments to issues of clear national interest and to a spirit of pluralism that values conciliation among diversified viewpoints?

Let me emphasize that I am not opposed to the concept of coalition government. Indeed it may be an inevitable response to the intrinsic pluralism of many of the countries in which I work. But the high level of political instability and failure around the world illustrates the need for creative new thinking about this particularly demanding form of democracy.

What constitutional options and best practices will give coalition government the greatest chance of stability and consistent, high quality performance? The alternative is a world widely characterized by significant numbers of unstable states — a scenario to be avoided.

Again, the discussion of comparative political systems is just one of many conversations in which the great universities of the world should be vital participants. Our own Aga Khan University is now planning a new Graduate School of Government, Public Policy and Civil Society to help address these issues. And surely this is a discussion in which the University of Ottawa can make a special contribution, given the commitment you have articulated to research the topic of “Canada and the World” — your focus on international intellectual engagement, including 140 bilateral university agreements, your emphasis on fostering democracy, and indeed the creation of a new premier Centre for Governance and Public Policy Research.

I know, too, that this University’s global effectiveness is reinforced by the high regard in which Canada is held as a valued international partner. In my experience, a country’s standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognized by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others.

In this context, Canada has truly become a great world power.

His Highness, The Aga Khan, is the 49th and current Imam of the Shia Imami Nizari Ismaili Muslims.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

His Highness the Aga Khan receives honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa


Please also see: Photographs, Speech by His Highness the Aga Khan
[Français]

OTTAWA, January 13, 2012 — His Highness the Aga Khan was today awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa for his service to humanity.

In his welcome remarks, Allan Rock, President of the University of Ottawa, addressed the Aga Khan, saying “we see Your Highness’ presence today as a call to action for all in our university community who seek to serve humanity.” He described the Aga Khan as an exceptional man who has used his own faith background to speak directly to the goodness in all people.

The degree was awarded at a special convocation, presided over by Huguette Labelle, in what was her last official event following an 18-year tenure as Chancellor of the University of Ottawa. Chancellor Labelle noted “One of the privileges of being Chancellor is the opportunity to recognize individuals who have shown outstanding leadership and an exemplary commitment to service to others.” Recognizing the Aga Khan’s global achievements, she said: “His work has bettered the lives of people and communities around the world".

Addressing the convocation, which was attended by members of the University Senate and Faculty, leaders from various levels of government, and members of the diplomatic corps, the Aga Khan spoke about governance and public policy, and, specifically, “the difficulty of establishing workable constitutional systems - especially in countries with less experience in democratic governance”. He noted that “constitutional arrangements should respect inherited traditions, ensure fairness to minority communities, respond to rural as well as urban concerns and underwrite equitable opportunity for a better life. Reconciling the global and the local, the urban and the rural, the regional and the national, is a formidable challenge - one that calls for the best of our intellectual energies and consistent fine-tuning over time.”

Commending the work of the University of Ottawa, and Canada, the Aga Khan said: “… this University’s global effectiveness is reinforced by the high regard in which Canada is held as a valued international partner.” He went on to explain: “In my experience, a country’s standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognised by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others. In this context, Canada has truly become a great, world power.”

His Highness the Aga Khan is the forty-ninth hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. He assumed the office of the Imamat in July 1957, and since then has worked to improve living conditions and foster social, cultural, and economic opportunities for men and women in the developing world. The agencies of the AKDN, which he has established over the past 45 years, encompass foundations, universities and programs in 30 countries, including Aga Khan Foundation Canada.

New programmes established in Canada include the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto (due to open in 2013), which exhibits art relating to the intellectual, cultural, artistic and religious heritage of Islamic communities, and the Global Centre for Pluralism, a collaboration with the Government of Canada that is founded on the premise that tolerance, openness and understanding towards the cultures, social structures, values and faiths of other peoples are essential to the very survival of an interdependent world.

For further information, please contact:

Jennifer Pepall
Director of Public Affairs, Aga Khan Foundation Canada
Telephone: +1 (613) 237 2532 ext 120
E-mail: jpepall@akfc.ca

http://www.akdn.org/Content/1109/His-Highness-the-Aga-Khan-receives-honorary-doctorate-from-the-University-of-Ottawa
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.akdn.org/content/1110

Speech by His Highness the Aga Khan at the Ceremony Conferring the Honorary Doctorate at the University of Ottawa

13 January 2012


Please also see: Press Release, Photographs

Bismillah-ir-Rahman-ir-Rahim

Chancellor Labelle
President Rock
Excellencies
Distinguished Guests

Permettez-moi d'exprimer avant toute chose ma profonde reconnaissance pour l'insigne honneur que vous me faites.

Je suis également heureux de partager ce moment avec toutes les personnalités conviées aujourd'hui, car vous êtes tous des amis de longue date, ou de nouveaux amis. Je voudrais aussi dire toute ma gratitude pour l'excellence de la coopération dont le Réseau Aga Khan pour le Développement a bénéficié de la part des membres de votre Université, de votre ville et de votre pays. Un exemple tout à fait récent, bien sûr, est le nouveau Centre Mondial du Pluralisme, notre projet commun avec le Gouvernement du Canada, projet qui est aujourd'hui devenu une réalité ici à Ottawa.

Je me dois de souligner que votre Chancelière, Huguette Labelle, est Membre du Conseil de ce Centre, ce qui ne représente que l'une des nombreuses manières dont elle a contribué personnellement aux projets dans lesquels je me suis moi-même profondément impliqué, sans compter les innombrables services qu'elle a rendus au Canada et au monde. Je suis profondément heureux de lui adresser aujourd'hui une salutation toute particulière, au moment où ses hautes fonctions au sein de l'Université d'Ottawa - dix-huit années en qualité de Chancelière !- arrivent à leur terme.

L'esprit de coopération que j'ai évoqué, sur les plans personnel et institutionnel, est bien entendu le reflet des préoccupations que nous partageons à propos des défis auxquels notre monde est maintenant confronté. J'ai été heureux à cet égard de constater que l'Université d'Ottawa a focalisé son attention sur nombre de ces défis dans son nouveau plan stratégique Destination 2020. Votre engagement en faveur du bilinguisme, à titre d'exemple, est le miroir de notre propre volonté de faire progresser l'esprit de pluralisme, et de notre conviction que l'affirmation d'une identité culturelle n'est en rien contradictoire avec l'idée de promouvoir la coopération interculturelle. De fait, les deux mouvements s'épaulent mutuellement.

J'ai aussi à l'esprit la façon impressionnante dont vous avez porté votre intérêt sur un large éventail des sciences de la santé, des sciences moléculaires et des technologies de la communication, intérêt que notre Réseau partage.

There are many topics of mutual interest that I could talk about today. But I have picked just one. In my eyes it is important - and I understand that it is also high among your priorities. I refer to the field of governance and public policy, and, specifically, to the difficulty of establishing workable constitutional systems - especially in countries with less experience in democratic governance.

As you know, my own interests in the last 50 years as Imam of the Ismaili community, have been primarily focused on Africa, South Asia, Central Asia and the Middle-East - and on improving the quality of life for the people who live there. The more I think about this matter, the more I am persuaded that one of the critical barriers to progress is the way in which governing processes occur.

The University of Ottawa has a long tradition of sharing internationally in the hard work of intellectual inquiry. Canada’s Governor General recently referred to this process as “the Diplomacy of Knowledge.” And it seems to me that questions of constitutional governance in the developing world deserve a particularly high place on that agenda.

The so-called Arab Spring has brought special attention to this challenge - illustrating that it is easier to rally people in opposition to a particular government than to forge agreement about new governing processes. But, while this pattern has recently been more dramatically evident, it has been a reality for a very, very long time.

In my life, the two moments which contributed most dramatically to this condition were the fall of the British and French colonial empires after World War II - and then the disintegration of the Soviet Union and its Eastern European empire two decades ago. The process continues today, as developing nations re-examine - sometimes peacefully, sometimes violently - the structures under which they are governed.

In some cases and I think here of Kenya’s very new constitution - power has been diffused - in response no doubt to pressures from ethnic, economic, religious and other centrifugal forces. One risk of decentralization is that it can place more decision-making power into the hands of communities that have had less access to education and governing experience, and less exposure to national and global issues.

Perhaps this is why, in some cases, the trend has been to consolidate governing authority - such as in Afghanistan, with the aim of overcoming inertia and inefficiency - as well as - fragmented and provincial outlooks.

The history of constitutions can be seen, as an oscillation between the two poles of centralization and diffusion - with new concentrations of power often amplifying the temptation to abuse, while new dispersions of power are often associated with stagnation, paralysis and even more opportunities for corruption. Arrangements that effectively balance power - through a federalist approach, for example, are elusive. What is critical is that constitutional arrangements should respect inherited traditions, ensure fairness to minority communities, respond to rural as well as urban concerns and underwrite equitable opportunity for a better life. Reconciling the global and the local, the urban and the rural, the regional and the national, is a formidable challenge - one that calls for the best of our intellectual energies and consistent fine-tuning over time.

There is a second question related to the experience of fledgling - and often failing – democracies. In much of the developed world, we have seen the emergence, over time, of two-pronged political structures - where one party forms a government and the other constitutes the opposition. This arrangement can foster greater accountability and even a certain stability. But I have to say, I am increasingly sceptical about the emergence of such constructs in many developing countries. To the contrary, I suspect that a continuing multiplicity of widely differentiated parties will mean that some form of coalition government will become the norm. This will especially be the case, of course, in societies that are - multi-cultural, multi-religious, or struggling to accommodate secular and religious political forces.

The difficulty is, however, that multi-party coalitions can be intrinsically undisciplined, with their differing agendas, and often unstable. In such situations, the threat of defection can be highly destabilizing, while accountability is often blurred and transparency is discouraged. Yet, coalition governance is now becoming a familiar form of government in many countries of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The broader the array of parties, the greater the risk that they will be based on personalities or narrow parochial identities, rather than a broadly-recognized, predictable point of view.

There is certainly no straightforward, universal formula to apply in such situations. We must not naively assume that what has worked in some parts of the western world, for example, will also work the same way in less developed contexts. Different places, different histories require quite different approaches.

The questions raised by coalition governance are not easy ones – either in the developing world or the developed world. What should be the rules under which parties and other governing entities are put together? How can we best find the glue that will hold them together - such as joint commitments to issues of clear national interest – and to a spirit of pluralism which values conciliation among diversified viewpoints?

Let me emphasize that I am not opposed to the concept of coalition government. Indeed it may be an inevitable response to the intrinsic pluralism of many of the countries in which I work. But the high level of political instability and failure around the world illustrates the need for creative new thinking about this particularly demanding form of democracy.

What constitutional options and best practices will give coalition government the greatest chance of stability and consistent, high quality performance?

The alternative is a world widely characterized by significant numbers of unstable states. It is a scenario to be avoided.

Again, the discussion of comparative political systems is just one of many conversations in which the great universities of the world should be vital participants. Our own Aga Khan University is now planning a new Graduate School of Government, Public Policy and Civil Society to help address these issues. And surely this is a discussion in which the University of Ottawa can make a special contribution - given the commitment you have articulated to research, the topic of “Canada and the World” - your focus on international intellectual engagement - including 140 bilateral university agreements - your emphasis on fostering democracy, and, indeed, the creation of a new premier Centre for Governance and Public Policy Research.

I know, too, that this University’s global effectiveness is reinforced by the high regard in which Canada is held as a valued international partner. In my experience, a country’s standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognised by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others. In this context, Canada has truly become a great, world power.

Thank you
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2012 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Globe and Mail photo:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=1Wp2ji5K7I_Q_KCs-IMjBSnEhVrenHE89WNlvJrvlBfna_BKUr4AUu87w2_Pk&hl=en_US&pli=1
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aga Khan awarded honorary doctorate in Ottawa
Tuesday January 17 2012

Staff Report

http://www.southasianfocus.ca/community/article/103489

His Highness the Aga Khan was last week awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa for his service to humanity.

The degree was conferred at a special convocation presided over by Chancellor Huguette Labelle and University President Allan Rock.

Accepting the honour, the Aga Khan spoke about governance and public policy and, specifically, “the difficulty of establishing workable constitutional systems — especially in countries with less experience in democratic governance”.

He said, “Constitutional arrangements should respect inherited traditions, ensure fairness to minority communities, respond to rural as well as urban concerns and underwrite equitable opportunity for a better life. Reconciling the global and the local, the urban and the rural, the regional and the national, is a formidable challenge — one that calls for the best of our intellectual energies and consistent fine-tuning over time.”

Commending the work of the University of Ottawa, and Canada, the Aga Khan said: “… this University’s global effectiveness is reinforced by the high regard in which Canada is held as a valued international partner.” He went on to explain: “In my experience, a country’s standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognized by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others. In this context, Canada has truly become a great, world power.”

Addressing the Aga Khan, President Rock said, “We see Your Highness’ presence today as a call to action for all in our university community who seek to serve humanity.” He described the Aga Khan as an exceptional man who has used his own faith background to speak directly to the goodness in all people.

Chancellor Labelle noted, “One of the privileges of being Chancellor is the opportunity to recognize individuals who have shown outstanding leadership and an exemplary commitment to service to others.”

Recognizing the Aga Khan’s global achievements, Labelle added: “His work has bettered the lives of people and communities around the world.”

The convocation was attended by members of the university senate and faculty, leaders from various levels of government, and members of the diplomatic corps.

His Highness the Aga Khan is the forty-ninth hereditary Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. He assumed the office of the Imamat in July 1957, and since then has worked to improve living conditions and foster social, cultural, and economic opportunities for men and women in the developing world.

The agencies of the AKDN, which he has established over the past 45 years, encompass foundations, universities and programs in 30 countries, including Aga Khan Foundation Canada.

New programmes established in Canada include the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto (due to open in 2013), which exhibits art relating to the intellectual, cultural, artistic and religious heritage of Islamic communities, and the Global Centre for Pluralism, a collaboration with the Government of Canada that is founded on the premise that tolerance, openness and understanding towards the cultures, social structures, values and faiths of other peoples are essential to the very survival of an interdependent world.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Video:

http://www.akdn.org/videos_detail.asp?VideoId=140
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Statements & Hansard^ All StatementsHis Royal Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan—Congratulations on Honorary Degree

Hon. Mobina S. B. Jaffer:
Honourable senators, on Friday, January 13, His Royal Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan, spiritual leader of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, received an honorary doctorate from the University of Ottawa for his service to humanity.

For over 50 years, His Royal Highness the Aga Khan has worked tirelessly to improve the quality of life of people living in the poorest and most disadvantaged areas of the world, particularly Africa, Central and South Asia and the Middle East. Allan Rock, President of the University of Ottawa, said the following about the Aga Khan's accomplishments:

His Highness speaks directly to the goodness in all people. By his words and actions, he has demonstrated that there are no divisions among us if our desire truly is to create a better world.

Honourable senators, when speaking to the people assembled at the graduation ceremony, His Highness shared several important messages, some of which pertain directly to the work that we do in this institution. In his speech, which focused mainly on governance and public policy, His Highness talked about the challenges facing many developing countries that are seeking to establish sustainable democracies and constitutional systems. He also emphasized how important it is to remember that solutions that may work in more affluent societies may not work in developing countries. This must be taken into account when we provide assistance to developing countries in the area of governance. We must adapt our solutions to individual countries, taking into account their history and the realities that define them.

Honourable senators, His Highness the Aga Khan recently selected Canada to direct a number of high-profile projects, namely an Ismaili centre, a museum and a park in Toronto, as well as the Global Centre for Pluralism located here in Ottawa.

We must remember why His Highness chose Canada to implement these very important projects. To end his speech, His Highness made this very profound statement:

In my experience, a country's standing in our contemporary world is no longer recognized by what it can achieve for itself, but by what it can do for others. In this context, Canada has truly become a great world power.

Honourable senators, His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan has put his trust in our country because he believes that Canada is a fair and tolerant nation that takes pride in equality. Let us continue to work hard and strengthen these values.

http://www.liberalsenateforum.ca/In-The-Senate/Statement/15331_His-Royal-Highness-Prince-Karim-Aga-KhanCongratulations-on-Honorary-Degree
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