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Khōjā

Negotiating the Racial Boundaries of Khōjā Caste Membership in Late Nineteenth-Century Colonial Zanzibar (1878–1899)

This article explores late nineteenth-century identity formation and caste boundaries among the Khōjā of colonial Zanzibar. The central concern regarding children born to a non-Khōjā parent was what status, particularly regarding rights of inheritance, the multiracial children born of these relationships had within the caste structure. The case of Nasur Jesa v. Hurbayee suggests that the attitude toward these children was inconsistent; sometimes they were embraced,and at other times they were shunned by the Khōjā community.

Negotiating the Racial Boundaries of Khōjā Caste Membership in Late Nineteenth-Century Colonial Zanzibar (1878–1899)

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2014
Date Published  2014
Authors  Akhtar, Iqbal
Original Publication  Journal of Africana Religions, Vol. 2, No. 3 (2014), pp. 297-316
Publisher  Penn State University Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/jafrireli.2.3.0297 .
Source  

Florida International University

Key Words  chotara; jotawa; Khōjā; Zanzibar; Ismaili; Ithnā ʿAsharī; Aga Khan; firman; jamat

The Narrative Prayers ( kaha ) of the Indo-African Khōjā

The Khōjā are an Indic Muslim caste whose origins lie in twelfth- and thirteenth-century Punjab and Kashmir. Over the following centuries a section of the community began a migration down the Indus valley and eastward into Kutch and Kathiawar, located in present-day Gujarat. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century the community began to migrate as traders throughout the western Indian Ocean littoral, establishing trading networks from Zanzibar to China (Nānjiāṇī 1–40, 256).

The Narrative Prayers ( kaha ) of the Indo-African Khōjā

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2014
Date Published  2014
Authors  Akhtar, Iqbal
Original Publication  Narrative Culture, Vol. 1, No. 2 (October 2014), pp. 217-238
Publisher  Wayne State University Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Narrative Culture.
Key Words  Khōjā; Indic Muslim; Indus valley; Kutch; Kathiawar


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