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English and the transnational Ismaili Muslim community: Identity, the Aga Khan, and infrastructure

The adoption of English as the official language of the transnational Ismaili Muslim community has its roots in the British Raj, which provides the backdrop for recent Ismaili history. Yet it is the Aga Khan IV, spiritual leader of the community since 1957, who has most avidly pushed English as part of a ‘language policy’.

English and the transnational Ismaili Muslim community: Identity, the Aga Khan, and infrastructure

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2016
Date Published  2016
Authors  Bolander, Brook
Original Publication  Language in Society 45(4), 583-604
Pagination  583-604
Source  

Room 735, 7/F, Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China

Key Words  Ismaili Muslim; English language; Aga Khan; and infrastructure

Antoine Isaac Silvestre de Sacy and the Myth of the Hachichins: Orientalizing hashish in nineteenth-century France

Building on recent historical scholarship on drugs and European empires, this study shows how early French conceptions

Antoine Isaac Silvestre de Sacy and the Myth of the Hachichins: Orientalizing hashish in nineteenth-century France

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2016
Date Published  2019
Authors  Guba, David A
Original Publication  Social History of Alcohol and Drugs, Volume 30 (2016)
Volume  Vol 30
Issue  SHAD (2016
Publisher  Social History of Alcohol and Drugs, Volume 30 (2016)
Source  

David A Guba is world history faculty member at Bard Early College in Baltimore, Maryland and a doctoral candidate in history at Temple University, Philadelphia.

Key Words  Hachichins; :Orientalizing hashish

An Assessment Batiniyya In History Of Seljuk

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2018
Date Published  2018
Authors  Bekman, Busranur
Alternate Title  Prof. Dr. Tufan Buzpınar at Istanbul Şehir University
Source  

Prof. Dr. Tufan Buzpınar

Key Words  Batinids; Seljuks; Hasan Sabbâh; Nazari Ismail; Batinids

Al-Shaykh al-Ṭūsī: His Writings on Theology and their Reception*

While the theological thought of Twelver Shiʿism during the 3rd/9th and 4th/10th centuries has been studied relatively well (as much as is possible on the basis of the few, mostly secondary sources that are preserved),1 little is known about its doctrinal
developments from the early 5th/11th century onwards.

Al-Shaykh al-Ṭūsī: His Writings on Theology and their Reception

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2020
Authors  Ansari, Hassan; Schmidtke, Sabine
Alternate Title  Al-Shaykh al-Ṭūsī
Source  

European Research Council’s FP 7 project ‘Rediscovering Theological Rationalism in the Medieval World of Islam’.

Key Words  Al-Shaykh al-Ṭūsī; Theology

Alamūt, Ismailism and Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Drawing extensively on the testimony of the Persian historians of the seventh-eighth hijri centuries (corresponding to the thirteen-fourteenth centuries of the Christian era), this article sketches a detailed picture of several personalities involved in founding the nascent Ismaili state centred at Alamūt in the fifth/eleventh century. This background sets the stage for analyzing a new manuscript source documenting Ismaili history and thought of this period, Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Alamūt, Ismailism and Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Drawing extensively on the testimony of the Persian historians of the seventh-eighth hijri centuries (corresponding to the thirteen-fourteenth centuries of the Christian era), this article sketches a detailed picture of several personalities involved in founding the nascent Ismaili state centred at Alamūt in the fifth/eleventh century. This background sets the stage for analyzing a new manuscript source documenting Ismaili history and thought of this period, Khwāja Qāsim Tushtarī’s Recognizing God

Addenda to Secondary Sources in Ismāʿīlī Studies: The Case of the Omissions

To date, there have been two major bibliographies of secondary sources in Ismāʿīlī studies, namely Nagib Tajdin’s A Bibliography of Ismailism1 and Farhad Daftary’s Ismāʿīlī Literature: A Bibliography of Sources and Studies (hereafter referred to as Ismāʿīlī Literature).2 The present bibliography is an attempt to identify sources omitted by these two works within the limits specified below. The purpose of the bibliography, then, is to provide students, scholars, and specialists with organized access to the omissions, thereby supporting research, teaching, and learning

Addenda to Secondary Sources in Ismāʿīlī Studies: The Case of the Omissions

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2013
Date Published  2013
Authors  JIWA, NAWAZALI A.
Original Publication  Journal of Middle Eastern Librarianship
Alternate Title  Mela Notes
Issue  Number 86
Pagination  20-100
Publisher  THE MIDDLE EAST LIBRARIANS ASSOCIATION
ISBN/ISSN Number  ISSN 0364-2410
Key Words  Ismaili bibliography

A Semiotics of Infinite Translucence: The Exoteric and Esoteric in Ismaili Muslim Hermeneutics

The complex juxtaposition of private practice and public visibility/invisibility of contemporary Ismaili Muslims has certain parallels with other religious communities, but it exhibits unique features. This community adheres to an esotericism that has shaped its hermeneutic and communication practices. In a seeming paradox, the group is also extensively engaged in the public sphere. However, its communal institutions are limiting the dissemination of texts pertaining to the religious addresses and biography of the group’s leader, Aga Khan IV.

A Semiotics of Infinite Translucence: The Exoteric and Esoteric in Ismaili Muslim Hermeneutics

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2015
Date Published  2015
Authors  Karim, Karim H.
Original Publication  Canadian Journal of Communication
Volume  Vol 40
Issue  (2015)
Pagination  11-28
Publisher  Canadian Journal of Communication
Key Words  Islam; Hermeneutics; Semiotics; Public sphere; Private sphere

A History of Syncretism of the Khoja Muslim Community

Medieval India seems to have been at the confluence of various grassroots religious/spiritual traditions. One of the important texts in this regard is Dasavatar credited to have been written Pir Sadr-ud-din, the founder of the Khoja Ismaili sect in the 15th century, in Sindh. The Dasavatar renames Kalki of Puranic literature as Nikalanak – the last messiah who is to come at the end of this era; acknowledges Vishnu, and also names Buddha as one of the avatars.

A History of Syncretism of the Khoja Muslim Community

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2017
Date Published  2017
Authors  Ranjan, Amit
Original Publication  The Apollonian
Volume  4: 1-2
Issue  March-June
Pagination  53-65
Publisher  The Apollonian
Key Words  Religious Polemic; Khoja Ismaili sect; Hindu Nizarpanthis; Indian Islamic scholarship; Ismaili Nizari’ism

A Comparison of the Refugee Resettlement of Ugandan Ismaili Muslims and Cambodian Theravada Buddhists in Canada

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This paper will compare the resettlement and ability to recreate religious identities of refugees from Uganda and Cambodia. The specific religious identities of focus are Ugandan South-Asian Ismaili Muslims and Cambodian Khmer Theravada Buddhists, and their resettlement in Ontario, Canada. This paper will argue that the three predominant factors that have made Ugandan Ismailis more successful in their integration into Canadian society than Cambodian Buddhists are; leadership, pre-migrational skills for adaptation and integration, and transnational connections.

A Comparison of the Refugee Resettlement of Ugandan Ismaili Muslims and Cambodian Theravada Buddhists in Canada

Publication Type  Article
Year of Publication  2010
Date Published  2010
Authors  Cummins, Alyshea
Original Publication  Wilfrid Laurier University
Publisher  Wilfrid Laurier University; International Migration Research Centre; The Canadian Immigration Historical Centre
Key Words  Ontario; Canada; Refugees; Settlement; Comparision; Ugandian; Ismaili; Muslims; Cambodian; Theravada; Buddhists

Pir Abul Hasan Shah

Our 48th Pir Abul Hasan Shah passed away at the age of only six months. He was the son of our 47th Pir Khalillulah (known also as Pir Shahbudin Shah). The year was 1885 and that year witnessed also the wafat of our 47th Imam Ali Shah Datar and the passing away of his sons Pir Shahbudin Shah and Nurshah.


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